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Newly Published: Christopher Nolan

New on our bookshelf today:

Christopher Nolan: A Critical Study of the Films
Darren Mooney

Christopher Nolan is one of the defining directors of the 21st century. Few of his contemporaries can compete in terms of critical and commercial success, let alone cultural impact. His films have a rare ability to transcend audience expectations, appealing to both casual moviegoers and dyed-in-the-wool cineastes.

Nolan’s work ranges from gritty crime thrillers (Memento, Insomnia) to spectacular blockbusters (the Dark Knight trilogy, Inception). They have taken audiences from the depths of space (Interstellar) to the harsh realities of war (Dunkirk). They have pushed the boundaries of possibility in modern movie making. This critical history covers his complete filmography, tracing his career from film student to indie darling to Oscar-nominated auteur.

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Newly Published: Religious Traditions of North Carolina

New on our bookshelf today:

Religious Traditions of North Carolina: Histories, Tenets and Leaders
Edited by W. Glenn Jonas, Jr. for the North Caroliniana Society

This book presents most of the religious traditions North Carolinians and their ancestors have embraced since 1650. Baptists, Presbyterians, Catholics, Methodists, Episcopalians, Jews, Brethren, Quakers, Lutherans, Mennonites, Moravians, and Pentecostals, along with African American worshippers and non–Christians, are covered in fourteen essays by men and women who have experienced the religions they describe in detail.

The North Caroliniana Society is a nonprofit, nonsectarian, membership organization dedicated to the promotion of increased knowledge and appreciation of North Carolina’s heritage through the encouragement of scholarly research and writing and the teaching of state and local history, literature and culture.

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Newly Published: My Own Four Walls

New on our bookshelf today:

My Own Four Walls: A Philadelphia Newspaper Columnist as Homesteader Between the Wars
Don Rose

Don Rose came to the U.S. from England in 1908, when he was 18, entering through Ellis Island like countless other immigrants. By 1941 he was one of Philadelphia’s best-known newspaper columnists. That year he published his gentle, funny memoir My Own Four Walls, the story of the ramshackle farmhouse he and Marjorie, his wife, bought in 1918 for themselves and their 12 children.

One of his grandsons, Neil Genzlinger, himself a journalist at the New York Times, here brings that book back to life, with the original illustrations, a century after his grandfather had signed the deed. Part diary, part DIY manual, Rose’s unsung classic is a tale of smoky fireplaces, leaky ceilings and unruly gardens, at a time when refrigerators were newfangled and suburban homes were furnished at country auctions. Most of all it is a story of how one man, with persistence, slowly put down roots in his adopted country.

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Newly Published: Under Fire with ARVN Infantry

New on our bookshelf today:

Under Fire with ARVN Infantry: Memoir of a Combat Advisor in Vietnam, 1966–1967
Bob Worthington

From 1945 to 1973, more than 100,000 members of the U.S. military were advisors in Vietnam. Of these, 66,399 were combat advisors. Eleven were awarded the Medal of Honor, 378 were killed and 1393 were wounded. Combat advisors lived and fought with South Vietnamese combat units, advising on tactics and weapons and liaising with local U.S. military support.

Bob Worthington’s first tour (1966–1967) began with training at the Army Special Warfare School in unconventional warfare, Vietnamese culture and customs, advisor responsibilities and Vietnamese language. Once in-country, he acted as senior advisor to infantry defense forces and then an infantry mobile rapid reaction force.

Worthington worked alongside ARVN forces, staging operations against Vietcong and North Vietnamese Army units and coordinated actions with the U.S. Marines. He describes a night helicopter assault by 320-man ARVN battalion against a 1,200-man NVA regiment. On another night, the Vietcong ceased fire while Worthington arranged a Marine helicopter to medevac a wounded baby.

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Newly Published: The Hopefuls

New on our bookshelf today:

The Hopefuls: Chasing a Rock ’n’ Roll Dream in the Minnesota Music Scene
Paul V. Allen

Songwriters, performers and producers Erik Appelwick, Eric Fawcett, John Hermanson and Darren Jackson were important players in an early 2000s musical collective. This collective included genres such as folk, power pop, R & B, electro-funk and indie rock. Well-known bands Storyhill, Spymob, Alva Star, Kid Dakota, Vicious Vicious, Tapes ’n Tapes, Olympic Hopefuls and others were part of this movement.

These four men worked for their rock n’ roll dreams, producing well-crafted albums and exciting live performances along the way. Their shared biography draws from dozens of new interviews and hundreds of articles to document their intersecting musical journeys—from playing air guitar to KISS records to rocking gyms in high school cover bands to touring the world with some of pop music’s biggest names. Equal parts celebration and cautionary tale, this book discusses both the rewards and difficulties of life as an independent musician.

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Newly Published: Jean Gabin

New on our bookshelf today:

Jean Gabin: The Actor Who Was France
Joseph Harriss

Jean Gabin was more than just a star of iconic movies still screened in film festivals around the world. To many, he was France itself. During his 45-year career, he acted in 95 French films, including Le Quai des BrumesLa Grande IllusionTouchez Pas au Grisbi and French Cancan.

From his start as a reluctant song and dance man at the Moulin Rouge and Folies Bergère, Gabin became a first-magnitude actor under such directors as Julien Duvivier, Marcel Carné and Jean Renoir. This revealing biography traces his involvement in the réalisme poétique and film noir movements of the 1930s and 1940s, his unhappy Hollywood years, his role in the World War II liberation of France, his tumultuous affairs with Michèle Morgan and Marlene Dietrich and his real-life role as a Normandy gentleman farmer.

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Newly Published: Artistic Collaboration Today

New on our bookshelf today:

Artistic Collaboration Today: Profiles of Creative Teams in Diverse Media
Victor M. Cassidy

Most artists work alone, but some find a creative partner and team up for their entire careers. Artistic collaborators testify that their work done jointly is better than what each person could create on his or her own. They say this collaboration is like marriage in the way that both partners benefit from a commitment to shared goals, excellent communication and trust.
Based on studio visits and in-depth interviews, this book reports on more than forty collaborating sculptors, painters, printmakers, photographers and other artists who have worked in tandem with architects and performers.

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Newly Published: Fantasy Literature and Christianity

New on our bookshelf today:

Fantasy Literature and Christianity: A Study of the Mistborn, Coldfire, Fionavar Tapestry and Chronicles of Thomas Covenant Series
Weronika Łaszkiewicz

The debate surrounding the Christian aspects of C.S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia, J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials and J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter has revealed not only the prominence of religious themes in fantasy fiction, but also readers’ concerns over portrayals of religion in fantasy. Yet while analyses of these works fill many volumes, other fantasy series have received much less attention. This critical study explores the fantastic religions and religious themes in the works of American and Canadian writers Stephen R. Donaldson (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant), Guy Gavriel Kay (Fionavar Tapestry), Celia S. Friedman (Coldfire Trilogy), and Brandon Sanderson (Mistborn) series. References to biblical tradition and Christian teachings reveal these writers’ overall approach to Christianity and the relationship between Christianity and the fantasy genre.

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Newly Published: Edmond O’Brien

New on our bookshelf today:

Edmond O’Brien: Everyman of Film Noir
Derek Sculthorpe

One of the most versatile actors of his generation, Edmond O’Brien made an impact in a series of iconic noir films. From a man reporting his own murder in D.O.A. (1949) to the conflicted title character in The Bigamist (1953), he portrayed the confusion of the Everyman in the postwar world.

His memorable roles spanned genres from Shakespeare to westerns and comedies—he also turned his hand to directing. He won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor as the harassed press agent Oscar Muldoon in Joseph Mankiewicz’s bitter Cinderella fable The Barefoot Contessa (1954). This first in-depth study of O’Brien charts his life and career from the Broadway stage to Hollywood in its heyday and the rise of television, revealing a devoted family man dedicated to his craft.

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Newly Published: Baseball Hall of Fame Autographs

New on our bookshelf today:

Baseball Hall of Fame Autographs: A Reference Guide, 2d ed.
Ron Keurajian

Richly illustrated with nearly 1,000 examples of both autographs and forgeries, this new and expanded edition includes signature studies of all Hall of Famers from the 19th century to the present. Collectors can compare signatures to the examples to determine the genuineness of autographs.
Shoeless Joe and the rest of the Black Sox are explored in depth, along with Roger Maris, Gil Hodges and the top 50 non–Hall of Fame autographs.
A new price guide examines values of various signed mediums. A market population grid lists rare and seldom seen signatures.

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Newly Published: Post-Apocalyptic Patriarchy

New on our bookshelf today:

Post-Apocalyptic Patriarchy: American Television and Gendered Visions of Survival
Carlen Lavigne

Twenty-first century American television series such as RevolutionFalling SkiesThe Last Ship and The Walking Dead have depicted a variety of doomsday scenarios—nuclear cataclysm, rogue artificial intelligence, pandemic, alien invasion or zombie uprising. These scenarios speak to longstanding societal anxieties and contemporary calamities like 9/11 or the avian flu epidemic. Questions about post-apocalyptic television abound: whose voices are represented? What tomorrows are they most afraid of? What does this tell us about the world we live in today? The author analyzes these speculative futures in terms of gender, race and sexuality, revealing the fears and ambitions of a patriarchy in flux, as exemplified by the “return” to a mythical American frontier where the white male hero fights for survival, protects his family and crafts a new world order based on the old.

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Newly Published: Encyclopedia of Unaired Television Pilots, 1945–2018

New on our bookshelf today:

Encyclopedia of Unaired Television Pilots, 1945–2018
Vincent Terrace

Covering the years 1945–2018, this alphabetical listing provides details about 2,923 unaired television series pilots, including those that never went into production, and those that became series but with a different cast, such as The Green HornetThe Middle and Superman.

Rarities include proposed shows starring Bela Lugosi, Doris Day, Humphrey Bogart, Barbara Stanwyck, Orson Welles, Claudette Colbert and Mae West, along with such casting curiosities as Mona Freeman, not Gale Storm, as Margie in My Little Margie, and John Larkin as Perry Mason long before Raymond Burr played the role.

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Newly Published: The Relevant Library

New on our bookshelf today:

The Relevant Library: Essays on Adapting to Changing Needs
Edited by Vera Gubnitskaia and Carol Smallwood

At a time when libraries are no longer the leading proprietors of information, many library professionals find themselves rethinking their purpose. In this collection of new essays, contributors share their experiences and ideas for keeping libraries integral to changing communities.
Innovative approaches and best practices are discussed for strategic planning, packaging, branding and marketing, funding issues, physical spaces, collection needs and trends, partnerships, programming and services, professional education, and staffing.

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Newly Published: A Surgeon with Stilwell

New on our bookshelf today:

A Surgeon with Stilwell: Dr. John H. Grindlay and Combat Medicine in the China-Burma-India Theater of World War II
Alan K. Lathrop

United States Army surgeon John H. Grindlay served in the China-Burma-India Theater of World War II in 1941–1944. Drawing on his unpublished war diary and letters, this book sheds new light on the conduct of battlefield medicine in the tropics and provides a new perspective on such personalities as General Joseph W. Stilwell, the famed “Burma Surgeon” Dr. Gordon S. Seagrave, and Chiang Kai-shek. Stilwell’s famous 1942 “walkout” retreat from Burma to India is covered, along with the 1943 Allied return to Burma to push the Japanese from the Ledo Road connecting northeast India to southwestern China.

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Newly Published: The Music of Charlie Chaplin

New on our bookshelf today:

The Music of Charlie Chaplin
Jim Lochner

Charlie Chaplin the actor is universally synonymous with his beloved Tramp character. Chaplin the director is considered one of the great auteurs and innovators of cinema history. Less well known is Chaplin the composer, whose instrumental theme for Modern Times (1936) later became the popular standard “Smile,” a Billboard hit for Nat “King” Cole in 1954.

Chaplin was prolific yet could not read or write music. It took a rotating cast of talented musicians to translate his unorthodox humming, off-key singing, and amateur piano and violin playing into the singular orchestral vision he heard in his head.

Drawing on numerous transcriptions from 60 years of original scores, this comprehensive study reveals the untold story of Chaplin the composer and the string of famous (and not-so-famous) musicians he employed, giving fresh insight into his films and shedding new light on the man behind the icon.

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Newly Published: Chauncey Yellow Robe

New on our bookshelf today:

Chauncey Yellow Robe: A Biography of the American Indian Educator, ca. 1870–1930
David W. Messer

In 1883, 12-year old Canowicakte boarded a train on the Rosebud Indian Reservation, beginning a journey his friends said would end at the edge of the world. Raised as a traditional Lakota, he found Carlisle Indian School, with its well-documented horrors, was the end of the world as he knew it.

Renamed Chauncey Yellow Robe, he flourished at Carlisle, developed a lifelong friendship with founder Richard Pratt, and went on to work at Indian boarding schools for most of his professional life.

Despite his acceptance of Indian assimilation, he was adamant that Indians should maintain their identity and was an outspoken critic of their demeaning portrayal in popular Wild West shows. He was the star and technical director of The Silent Enemy (1930), one of the first accurate depictions of Indians on film. His life embodied a cultural conflict that still persists in American society.

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Newly Published: The Gothic Romance Wave

New on our bookshelf today:

The Gothic Romance Wave: A Critical History of the Mass Market Novels, 1960-1993
Lori A. Paige

The late 1960s and early 1970s saw the birth of modern feminism, the sexual revolution, and strong growth in the mass-market publishing industry. Women made up a large part of the book market, and Gothic fiction became a higher popular staple. Victoria Holt, Mary Stewart and Phyllis Whitney emerged as prominent authors, while the standardized paperback Gothic sold in the millions. Pitched at middle-class women of all ages, Gothics paved the way for contemporary fiction categories such as urban fantasy, paranormal romance and vampire erotica.

Though not as popular today as they once were, Gothic paperbacks retain a cult following—and the books themselves have become collectors’ items. They were also the first popular novels to present strong heroines as agents of liberation and transformation.

This work offers the missing chapters of the Gothic story, from the imaginative creations of Ann Radcliffe and the Brontë sisters to the bestseller 50 Shades of Grey.

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Newly Published: The Early Eastern Orthodox Church

New on our bookshelf today:

The Early Eastern Orthodox Church: A History, AD 60-1453
Stephen Morris

“It seemed good to the Holy Spirit and to us,” the apostles declared at the conclusion of their council described in Acts 15. This apostolic council was the first of many councils to come as Christians sought to discern the will of God in the midst of historic challenges.

The faithful continued to struggle to express their new apostolic faith in new words, new languages, new places and new times. Many issues—the interaction of science and faith, divinity and humanity, Church and State—continue to be pertinent today.

This book tells the story of these struggles from the days of the New Testament to the fall of the city of Constantinople in AD 1453. It focuses on the Christian community in the eastern Mediterranean which became known as the Byzantine Empire. Each chapter examines the personalities and theologies entwined at the heart of conflicts that shaped the medieval world as well as the modern cultures of Greece, the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

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Newly Published: The Bite, the Breast and the Blood

New on our bookshelf today:

The Bite, the Breast and the Blood: Why Modern Vampire Stories Suck Us In
Amy Williams Wilson

Central to every vampire story is the undead’s need for human blood, but equally compelling is the human ingestion of vampire blood, which often creates a bond. This blood connection suggests two primal, natural desires: breastfeeding and communion with God through a blood covenant.

This analysis of vampire stories explores the benefits of the bonding experiences of breastfeeding and Christian and vampire narratives, arguing that modern readers and viewers are drawn to this genre because of our innate fascination with the relationship between human and maker.

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Newly Published: Shapers of American Childhood

New on our bookshelf today:

Shapers of American Childhood: Essays on Visionaries from L. Frank Baum to Dr. Spock to J.K. Rowling
Edited by Kathy Merlock Jackson and Mark I. West

The experience of growing up in the U.S. is shaped by many forces. Relationships with parents and teachers are deeply personal and definitive. Social and economic contexts are broader and harder to quantify.

Key individuals in public life have also had a marked impact on American childhood. These 18 new essays examine the influence of pivotal figures in the culture of 20th and 21st century childhood and child-rearing, from Benjamin Spock and Walt Disney to Ruth Handler, Barbie’s inventor, and Ernest Thompson Seton, founder of the Boy Scouts of America.

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Four New Titles Reviewed in October Issue of Choice

Freedom Narratives of African American Women: A Study of 19th Century Writings
“Compelling…crucially contributing to feminist recovery work and scholarship in African American studies, Freedom Narratives of African American Women is required reading for those interested in 19th-century America…essential.”

The Postmodern Joy of Role-Playing Games: Agency, Ritual and Meaning in the Medium
“Groundbreaking study…this volume is required reading for RPG and gaming scholars…essential.”

The American Soldier, 1866–1916: The Enlisted Man and the Transformation of the United States Army
“This is a rewarding study of enlisted men in the post–Civil War era…recommended.”

Organized Crime in the United States, 1865–1941
“Challenges widely accepted views…an interesting historical analysis…recommended.”

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Newly Published: New York and the Lincoln Specials

New on our bookshelf today:

New York and the Lincoln Specials: The President’s Pre-Inaugural and Funeral Trains Cross the Empire State
Joseph D. Collea, Jr.

Abraham Lincoln’s presidency was bookended by a pair of dramatic railroad trips through the state of New York. His first term began with a pre-inaugural railway tour—his second ended with a funeral train. Each was a five-day crossing of the Empire State.

These two journeys allowed thousands of ordinary Americans first to celebrate, and later to mourn, the great president, and became indelibly etched in the memories of those who had the opportunity to stand along parade route.

Drawing on newspaper accounts, memoirs and diaries, this book brings to life the two epic and unique moments in both New York’s and the nation’s history.

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Newly Published: An American Town and the Vietnam War

New on our bookshelf today:

An American Town and the Vietnam War: Stories of Service from Stamford, Connecticut
Tony Pavia and Matt Pavia

Hundreds of young Americans from the town of Stamford, Connecticut, fought in the Vietnam War. These men and women came from all corners of the town. They were white and black, poor and wealthy. Some had not finished high school; others had graduate degrees. They served as grunts and helicopter pilots, battlefield surgeons and nurses, combat engineers and mine sweepers. Greeted with indifference and sometimes hostility upon their return home, Stamford’s veterans learned to suppress their memories in a nation fraught with political, economic and racial tensions. Now in their late 60s and 70s, these veterans have begun to tell their stories.

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Newly Published: Stardust International Raceway

New on our bookshelf today:

Stardust International Raceway: Motorsports Meets the Mob in Vegas, 1965–1971
Randall Cannon and Michael Gerry

Professional motorsports came to Las Vegas in the mid–1950s at a bankrupt horse track swarmed by gamblers—and soon became enmeshed with the government and organized crime. By 1965, the Vegas racing game moved from makeshift facilities to Stardust International Raceway, constructed with real grandstands, sanitary facilities and air-conditioned timing towers. Stardust would host the biggest racing names of the era—Mario Andretti, Parnelli Jones, John Surtees, Mark Donohue, Bobby Unser, Dan Gurney and Don Garlits among them.

Established by a notorious racketeer, the track stood at the confluence of shadowy elements—wiretaps, casino skimming, Howard Hughes, and the beginnings of Watergate. The author traces the Stardust’s colorful history through the auto racing monthlies, national newspapers, extensive interviews and the files of the FBI.

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Newly Published: The Fabulous Journeys of Alice and Pinocchio

New on our bookshelf today:

The Fabulous Journeys of Alice and Pinocchio: Exploring Their Parallel Worlds
Laura Tosi with Peter Hunt

Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass (1871) and Carlo Collodi’s Le Avventure di Pinocchio (1883) are among the most influential classics of children’s literature. Firmly rooted in their respective British and Italian national cultures, the Alice and Pinocchio stories connected to a worldwide audience almost like folktales and fairy tales and have become fixtures of postmodernism.

Although they come from radically different political and social backgrounds, the texts share surprising similarities. This comparative reading explores their imagery and history, and discusses them in the broader context of British and Italian children’s stories.

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Newly Published: Electric Airplanes and Drones

New on our bookshelf today:

Electric Airplanes and Drones: A History
Kevin Desmond

Attempts at electric powered flight date to well before the 19th century. Battery weight and low energy output made it impractical until the 1990s, when the advent of lightweight materials, more efficient solar power, improved engines and the Li-Po (lithium polymer) battery opened the skies to a wide variety of electric aircraft.

The author describes the diverse designs of modern electric flying machines—from tiny insect-styled drones to stratospheric airships—and explores developing trends, including flying cars and passenger airliners.

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Newly Published: Writing for College

New on our bookshelf today:

Writing for College: A No-B.S. Guide
Robert Alden Rubin

This book guides first-year students through the dos and don’ts of composition, from such basic questions as “Can I use ‘I’ in a college essay?” to more advanced points about structure and style. Emphasizing the importance of writing in all majors, the author encourages students to find their own voice and to express themselves without jargon or “academese.” Tips are provided on concision, use of supporting claims, marshaling arguments, researching topics, documenting sources, and revision.

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Newly Published: The International Medical Relief Corps in Wartime China, 1937–1945

New on our bookshelf today:

The International Medical Relief Corps in Wartime China, 1937–1945
Robert Mamlok, M.D.

Both before and during World War II, the Nazis restricted the rights of Jewish and communist doctors. Some fought back, first by fighting against Fascism in the Spanish Civil War and then by helping the Chinese in their struggle against Japan. There were, however, two rival factions in China. One favored Chiang Kai-shek (the nationalists) and the other, the communists—and 27 foreign medical personnel were caught between them. Amidst poverty, war and corruption, living conditions were poor and traveling was hazardous.

This book follows members of the Chinese Red Cross Medical Relief Corps through the war as they became enemy aliens and pursued their work despite the perils. These doctors had a keen sense of public health needs and contributed to the recognition and management of infectious diseases and nutritional disorders, all the while denouncing corruption, inhumanity and inequality.

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Newly Published: The Films of Budd Boetticher

New on our bookshelf today:

The Films of Budd Boetticher
Robert Nott

Budd Boetticher (1916–2001) was a bullfighter, a pleasant madman and a talented journeyman filmmaker who could—with the right material and drive—create a minor Western film classic as easily as he could kill a bull. Yet pain and passion naturally mixed in both endeavors. Drawing on studio archives and featuring insightful interviews with Boetticher and those who worked with him, this retrospective looks at each of his 33 films in detail, covering his cinematic career from his days as an assistant’s assistant on the set of Hal Roach comedies to his last documentary some 45 years later.

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Newly Published: The Echo of Odin

New on our bookshelf today:

The Echo of Odin: Norse Mythology and Human Consciousness
Edward W.L. Smith

The pagan mythology of the Vikings offers a rich metaphor for consciousness. This book presents the cosmography of Norse mythology as a landscape of human inner life. Each of the nine worlds of this cosmography is viewed as a symbol of a distinct type of consciousness that is emblematic of a particular perspective or way of relating to others.

Individual gods and goddesses are considered nuanced personifications of their worlds. The philosophy of pagan mythology is explored by comparing and contrasting the Sayings of Odin from the Norse Edda with the Christian Ten Commandments.

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Newly Published: Bystanders to the Vietnam War

New on our bookshelf today:

Bystanders to the Vietnam War: The Role of the United States Senate, 1950–1965
Ronald Allen Goldberg

Who was most responsible for the Vietnam War? Did President Lyndon Johnson simply continue the policies of his predecessors, Eisenhower and Kennedy, or was he the principal architect? What responsibility did Congress share? Was the Senate a coequal partner in creating the Vietnam policy or a secondary player?

Focusing on the U.S. Senate’s role in the war, this history records the various senators’ views in their own words. The author demonstrates that during the 20-year conflict—as throughout American history—the president was the principal formulator of policy on war and peace, including during the more recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Newly Published: Video Gaming in Science Fiction

New on our bookshelf today:

Video Gaming in Science Fiction: A Critical Study
Jason Barr

As video gaming and gaming culture became more mainstream in the 1970s, science fiction authors began to incorporate aspects of each into their work. This study examines how media-fueled paranoia about video gaming—first emerging almost fifty years ago—still resonates in modern science fiction. The author reveals how negative stereotypes of gamers and gaming have endured in depictions of modern gamers in the media and how honest portrayals are still wanting, even in the “forward thinking” world of science fiction.

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Newly Published: Pirates in History and Popular Culture

New on our bookshelf today:

Pirates in History and Popular Culture
Edited by Antonio Sanna

This collection of new essays covers the myriad portrayals of the figure of the pirate in historical records, literary narratives, films, television series, opera, anime and games. Contributors explore the nuances of both real and fictional pirates, giving attention to renowned works such as Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan, the Pirates of the Caribbean saga, and the anime One Piece, as well as less well known works such as pirate romances, William Clarke Russell’s The Frozen Pirate, Lionel Lindsay’s artworks, Steven Speilberg’s The Adventures of Tintin, and Pastafarian texts.

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New in Softcover: The Complete Kay Francis Career Record

Now available in softcover:

The Complete Kay Francis Career Record: All Film, Stage, Radio and Television Appearances
Lynn Kear and John Rossman

This book is the definitive guide to the film, stage, radio and television career of Kay Francis, one of the most glamorous stars from the golden age of Hollywood. For each film, the authors provide a thorough synopsis plus cast and crew information (including biographies), opening dates, production notes, behind-the-scenes details, and reviews. In addition, information is provided on her stage, radio, and television appearances, and a section is devoted to collecting Kay Francis memorabilia, including such items as cigarette cards, sheet music and soundtracks. Also covered is the stage and vaudeville career of Kay Francis’ mother, Katherine Clinton. A brief biography of Kay Francis is provided, along with an insightful foreword by film scholar James Robert Parish. Truly a treasure trove for Kay Francis fans and anyone interested in classic filmmaking in the 1930s and 1940s, the book includes more than 130 illustrations, many of them rare.

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Newly Published: Harold Gibbons

New on our bookshelf today:

Harold Gibbons: St. Louis Teamsters Leader and Warrior Against Jim Crow
Gordon Burnside

Harold Gibbons (1910–1982), leader of St. Louis Teamsters Local 688, fought and defeated Communists and mobsters and was instrumental in ending racial discrimination in the union. His many friends included Frank Sinatra and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. For a few years, he was Jimmy Hoffa’s right-hand man—the two fell out after the Kennedy assassination, which Hoffa celebrated and Gibbons mourned. Exploring his day-to-day work, the author reveals the full story of Gibbons’ secret effort with Kissinger and Hoffa to bring an end to the Vietnam War.

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Newly Published: Memory and Identity in Canadian Fiction

New on our bookshelf today:

Memory and Identity in Canadian Fiction: Self-Inventive Storytelling in the Works of Five Authors
Sharon Selby

Covering the works of Canadian authors Alistair Macleod, Michael Ondaatje, Jane Urquhart, Margaret Atwood and Drew Hayden Taylor, the author explores how the themes of memory, storytelling and identity develop in their fiction. For the narrative voices in these works, the past is embedded in the present and a wider cultural history is written over with personal significance. The act of storytelling shapes the characters’ lives, letting them rewrite the past and be haunted by it. Storytelling becomes an existential act of everyday connection among ordinary people and daily (often unrecognized) acts of heroism.

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Newly Published: The Body Burning Detail

New on our bookshelf today:

The Body Burning Detail: Memoir of a Marine Artilleryman in Vietnam
Bill Jones

A poignant memoir that recounts the author’s hair-raising—and occasionally hilarious—experiences as a young, not especially gung-ho Marine artilleryman in Vietnam. Gritty and disturbing, Bill Jones’ unvarnished narrative probes the lasting physical and emotional wounds of war and offers a combat veteran’s wry insight into the influence and relevance of America’s long and indecisive misadventure.

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Weekly Kindle Spotlight: September 17

Killer KaneOur weekly Kindle spotlight is back! Through September 30th, get these popular titles on Amazon Kindle for 3.99.

Killer Kane: A Marine Long-Range Recon Team Leader in Vientam, 1967-1968

Jack the Ripper and Black Magic: Victorian Conspiracy Theories, Secret Societies and the Supernatural Mystique of the Whitechapel Murders

Murder Files from Scotland Yard and the Black Museum

Kubrick’s Monolith: The Art and Mystery of 2001: A Space Odyssey

Organized Crime in the United States, 1865-1941

Richard Grenville and the Lost Colony of Roanoke

The Page Fence Giants: A History of Black Baseball’s Pioneering Champions

Jay-Z: Essays on Hip-Hop’s Philosopher King

Marvel Comics into Film: Essays on Adaptations Since the 1940s

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Newly Published: Original Jethro Tull

New on our bookshelf today:

Original Jethro Tull: The Glory Years, 1968–1980
Gary Parker

Jethro Tull was one of the truly innovative rock bands to emerge from the late 1960s. At their peak the idiosyncratic group, fronted by multi-instrumentalist Ian Anderson, resembled a troupe of roving English minstrels.

Crafting a signature progressive rock sound that resisted easy categorization, they were often derided by critics as too British, too eccentric, too theatrical. Over the span of a decade, Tull released a string of sublime albums featuring intricate compositions in a wide range of musical styles, with little regard for the showbiz maxim “give the public what it wants.”

Focusing on the years 1968–1980, this history includes insider accounts based on exclusive interviews with key members and rare photographs from Ian Anderson’s personal collection.

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Newly Published: George Orwell on Screen

New on our bookshelf today:

George Orwell on Screen: Adaptations, Documentaries and Docudramas on Film and Television
David Ryan

British author and essayist George Orwell shot to fame with two iconic novels: the anti–Stalinist satire Animal Farm and the dystopian masterpiece Nineteen Eighty-Four.

A few years after his death in 1950, the CIA bankrolled screen adaptations of both novels as Cold War propaganda. Orwell’s depiction of a totalitarian police state captivated the media in the 1980s. Today, mounting anxieties about digital surveillance and globalization have made him a hot property in Hollywood.

Drawing on interviews with actors, writers, directors and producers, this book presents the first comprehensive study of Orwell on film and television. Beginning with CBS’s 1953 live production of Nineteen Eighty-Four that mirrored the McCarthy witch hunts, the author covers 20 wide-ranging adaptations, documentaries and biopics, including two lost BBC dramatizations from 1965.

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Newly Published: Shakespeare’s Apprenticeship

New on our bookshelf today:

Shakespeare’s Apprenticeship: Identifying the Real Playwright’s Earliest Works
Ramon Jiménez

The contents of the Shakespeare canon have come into question in recent years as scholars add plays or declare others only partially his work. Now, new literary and historical evidence demonstrates that five heretofore anonymous plays published or performed during his lifetime are actually his first versions of later canonical works.

Three histories, The Famous Victories of Henry the FifthThe True Tragedy of Richard the Third, and The Troublesome Reign of John; a comedy, The Taming of a Shrew; and a romance, King Leir, are products of Shakespeare’s juvenile years. Later in his career, he transformed them into the plays that bear nearly identical titles. Each is strikingly similar to its canonical counterpart in terms of structure, plot and cast, though the texts were entirely rewritten.

Virtually all scholars, critics and editors of Shakespeare have overlooked or disputed the idea that he had anything to do with them. This addition of five plays to the Shakespeare canon introduces a new facet to the authorship debate, and supplies further evidence that the real Shakespeare was Edward de Vere, seventeenth Earl of Oxford.

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New in Softcover: Encyclopedia of Abortion in the United States, 2d ed.

Now available in softcover:

Encyclopedia of Abortion in the United States, 2d ed.
Louis J. Palmer, Jr. and Xueyan Z. Palmer

This now revised and updated encyclopedia comprehensively covers abortion from the founding of the nation through 2007. Since the publication of the first edition, the Supreme Court has issued a number of important opinions on abortion, such as the approval of a federal ban on partial-birth abortion in Gonzales v. Carhart. Along with new entries on these events and other topics, the second edition is also enhanced by more than 40 photographs and more than 300 charts and graphs. The roles of the Supreme Court and other judicial and legislative bodies are covered in great detail. Entries focus on the “voting” position taken by every Supreme Court justice who has ever participated in an abortion decision; provide the actual abortion laws of each state; and summarize individual statutes to help nonspecialist readers understand the laws. Many entries focus on the social, religious, or moral arguments surrounding abortion and identify and describe the leading pro-life and pro-choice abortion organizations. There are entries summarizing the major lawful or unlawful activities that have occurred in support or protest of abortion. Medical issues related to abortion are fully covered: modern contraceptive devices, different methods of abortion, the gestational development of the human fetus, embryonic cloning, assisted reproductive technology, surrogacy, and embryonic/fetal stem cell research.

 

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King Arthur Sales Starts Now

What is known of the legendary King Arthur is mostly derived from folklore and literature.  Though today, one is just as likely to have been introduced to King Arthur by a cartoon boy pulling a sword from a stone.  You’ll find books covering all disciplines in our new King Arthur catalog
For film studies, McFarland’s latest catalog includes such titles as Kevin J. Harty’s groundbreaking Cinema Arthuriana and The Reel Middle Ages.  For students (and professors) of Arthurian literature, William W. Kibler and R. Barton Palmer have brought us a very useful book for the classroom, Medieval Arthurian Epic and Romance.   It offers new translations from Latin, Middle English and Old French of texts that exemplify the most important traditions of Arthurian literature in the Middle Ages.  In addition to Arthuriana in folklore, literature and film, this new catalog also includes our line of popular works debating the evidence about historic sites and figures, including Hengest, Gwrtheyrn and the Chronology of Post-Roman BritainWhen you order direct from our website using the coupon code Arthur25, print editions of all Arthuriana books are 25% off September 15 through September 30.
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Newly Published: The Thirteenth Century

New on our bookshelf today:

The Thirteenth Century: A World History
Richard Bressler

The 13th Century was a fascinating era in world history. Genghis Khan established the largest contiguous land empire in history. The Magna Carta was drafted. Marco Polo travelled through Asia and trade expanded across the Indian Ocean and Baltic Sea, setting the stage for greater expansion in the 15th century. The Native Americans of Cahokia, Mesoamerica and the Chimor State flourished while Mali, Ethiopia and Great Zimbabwe throve in Sub-Saharan Africa.

This world history chronicles the important events in this pivotal century, while exploring many of the relevant figures of the era, including King John of England, St. Francis of Assisi, Balban of India and many others.

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Newly Published: Single Season Sitcoms of the 1990s

New on our bookshelf today:

Single Season Sitcoms of the 1990s: A Complete Guide
Bob Leszczak

During the “Must See TV” 1990s, Americans enjoyed such immensely popular sitcoms as FriendsSeinfeldHome Improvement and The Drew Carey Show. Shows that did not make the ratings cut numbered in the hundreds—the emergence of new networks and cable channels airing original programming resulted in a vast increase in short-lived sitcoms over the previous decade. Some of these “flops” were actually quite good and deserved a better fate.

The author revisits them—along with the “dramedies” of the day—with detailed entries providing production and broadcast information, along with critical analyses, and recollections by cast and crew members. A subsection highlights sitcoms that returned for an abbreviated second season. Dozens of cast and crew photographs are included.

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Newly Published: Adapted from the Original

New on our bookshelf today:

Adapted from the Original: Essays on the Value and Values of Works Remade for a New Medium
Edited by Laurence Raw

Critics and audiences often judge films, books and other media as “great” —but what does that really mean? This collection of new essays examines the various criteria by which degrees of greatness (or not-so) are constructed—whether by personal, political or social standards—through topics in cinema, literature and adaptation. The contributors recognize how issues of value vary across different cultures, and explore what those differences say about attitudes and beliefs.

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Newly Published: Terrifying Texts

New on our bookshelf today:

Terrifying Texts: Essays on Books of Good and Evil in Horror Cinema
Edited by Cynthia J. Miller and A. Bowdoin Van Riper

From Faust (1926) to The Babadook (2014), books have been featured in horror films as warnings, gateways, prisons and manifestations of the monstrous. Ancient grimoires such as the Necronomicon serve as timeless vessels of knowledge beyond human comprehension, while runes, summoning diaries, and spell books offer their readers access to the powers of the supernatural—but at what cost?
 This collection of new essays examines nearly a century of genre horror in which on-screen texts drive and shape their narratives, sometimes unnoticed. The contributors explore American films like The Evil Dead (1981), The Prophecy (1995) and It Follows (2014), as well as such international films as Eric Valette’s Malefique (2002), Paco Cabeza’s The Appeared (2007) and Lucio Fulci’s The Beyond (1981).

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Newly Published: Doing My Bit Over There

New on our bookshelf today:

Doing My Bit Over There: A U.S. Marine’s Memoir of the Western Front in World War I
Everard J. Bullis

Motivated by patriotism, 21-year old Everard Bullis of St. Paul, Minnesota—the only boy of five siblings from a middle-class family—enlisted in the U.S. Marines in 1917 and went to the Western Front. His clear-eyed memoir describes in detail the Fifth Marine Regiment’s desperate stand against repeated German assaults at Belleau Wood, along with actions at Soissons, St. Mihiel and Blanc Mont Ridge. Historical figures appear, including Captain Frank Whitehead, George W. Hamilton (“America’s Greatest World War I Hero”) and General John J. Pershing.

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Newly Published: Storytelling in the Modern Board Game

New on our bookshelf today:

Storytelling in the Modern Board Game: Narrative Trends from the Late 1960s to Today
Marco Arnaudo

Over the years, board games have evolved to include relatable characters, vivid settings and compelling, intricate plotlines. In turn, players have become more emotionally involved—taking on, in essence, the role of coauthors in an interactive narrative.

Through the lens of game studies and narratology—traditional storytelling concepts applied to the gaming world—this book explores the synergy of board games, designers and players in story-oriented designs. The author provides development guidance for game designers and recommends games to explore for hobby players.

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Newly Published: The Elusive African Renaissance

New on our bookshelf today:

The Elusive African Renaissance: Essays on Today’s Critical Development Issues
Edited by George Klay Kieh, Jr.

Africa faces several major development challenges that have adversely affected the political and material well being of the majority of the people living there.

This collection of new essays rigorously analyzes those frontier development issues—including democracy, leadership, the economy, poverty alleviation through microfinance schemes, food security, education, health and political instability—and offers prescriptions that differ from the dominant neoliberal solutions.

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Newly Published: Teens and the New Religious Landscape

New on our bookshelf today:

Teens and the New Religious Landscape: Essays on Contemporary Young Adult Fiction
Edited by Jacob Stratman

How are teenagers’ religious experiences shown in today’s young adult literature? How do authors use religious texts and beliefs to add depth to characters, settings and plots? How does YA fiction place itself in the larger conversation regarding religion?

Modern YA fiction does not shy away from the dilemmas and anxieties teenagers face today. While many stories end with the protagonist in a state of flux if not despair, some authors choose redemption or reconciliation.

This collection of new essays explores these issues and more, with a focus on stories in which characters respond to a new (often shifting) religious landscape, in both realistic and fantastic worlds.

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Newly Published: Redes literarias

New on our bookshelf today:

Redes literarias: Antología del texto hispánico en su contexto histórico-cultural
Compilado y comentado por Mindy E. Badía y Bonnie L. Gasior

Esta nueva antología literaria—dirigida a estudiantes del tercer o cuarto año de un programa de español universitario—abarca poesía, prosa narrativa, drama y ensayo de autores españoles, latinoamericanos, y latinos. Las lecturas están organizadas cronológicamente y cada selección está acompañada por una introducción a su contexto histórico y sus conexiones con otras obras. Redes proporciona un conocimiento básico de la historia literaria del mundo hispano además de una introducción a los aspectos formales del análisis  literario.

This literary anthology—aimed at students in the third or fourth years of a university-level Spanish program—includes poetry, prose narrative, drama and essays by Spanish, Latin American and Latino authors. The readings are organized chronologically, and each selection is accompanied by an introduction to its historical context and its connections to other works. Redes provides a background of the literary history of the Hispanic world as well as an introduction to the formal aspects of literary analysis.

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Newly Published: Ho Chi Minh’s Blueprint for Revolution

New on our bookshelf today:

Ho Chi Minh’s Blueprint for Revolution: In the Words of Vietnamese Strategists and Operatives
Virginia Morris with Clive A. Hills

When Saigon fell to North Vietnamese forces on April 30, 1975, the communist victory sent shockwaves around the world. Using ingenious strategy and tactics, Hồ Chí Minh had shown it was possible for a tiny nation to defeat a mighty Western power. The same tactics have been studied and replicated by revolutionary forces and terrorist organizations across the globe.

Drawing on recently declassified documents and rare interviews with Hồ Chí Minh’s strategists and operatives, this book offers fresh perspective on his blueprint and the reasons behind both the French (1945–1954) and the American (1959–1975) failures in Vietnam, concluding with an analysis of the threat this model poses today.

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Newly Published: The Olympic Club of New Orleans

New on our bookshelf today:

The Olympic Club of New Orleans: Epicenter of Professional Boxing, 1883–1897
S. Derby Gisclair

Established in 1883, the Olympic Club catered to a variety of pursuits from target shooting to billiards to boxing—the most popular sport in New Orleans, despite legal prohibitions.

A revised city ordinance and a vague state statute permitting boxing sponsored by chartered athletic clubs were frequently tested at the Olympic, the epicenter of boxing in America. Between 1890 and 1894, the club’s 10,000–seat arena hosted six world championship and seven national or regional title bouts. The 1892 Fistic Carnival featured three world title fights on three consecutive days, culminating in the World Heavyweight Championship between John L. Sullivan and James J. Corbett.

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Newly Published: Czechoslovakia Behind the Curtain

New on our bookshelf today:

Czechoslovakia Behind the Curtain: Life, Work and Culture in the Communist Era
Thomas K. Murphy

During the Cold War, the West—especially in the popular media—tended to view communism as a monolithic phenomenon, with little variation throughout the Eastern Bloc. Yet culture and geography contributed to social diversity among and within communist systems.

Drawing on interviews with approximately 100 Czechs and Slovaks, the author provides new perspectives on day-to-day life in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic. Their recollections paint a more complex picture of the life on the other side of the Iron Curtain, from the Sputnik era reforms of the early 1960s, through the tumult of the 1968 Prague Spring and the subsequent Soviet invasion, to the Velvet Revolution, the collapse of the communist regime and the formation of democratic Czechoslovakia in 1989.

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Newly Published: The Loyalist Conscience

New on our bookshelf today:

The Loyalist Conscience: Principled Opposition to the American Revolution
Chaim M. Rosenberg

Freedom of speech was restricted during the Revolutionary War. In the great struggle for independence, those who remained loyal to the British crown were persecuted with loss of employment, eviction from their homes, heavy taxation, confiscation of property and imprisonment. Loyalist Americans from all walks of life were branded as traitors and enemies of the people. By the end of the war, 80,000 had fled their homeland to face a dismal exile from which few would return, outcasts of a new republic based on democratic values of liberty, equality and justice.

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Newly Published: Six Plays of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

New on our bookshelf today:

Six Plays of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Edited by Jamil Khoury, Michael Malek Najjar and Corey Pond

A bold and singular collection of six plays by Arab and Jewish playwrights explores the human toll of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: The Admission by Motti Lerner, Scenes From 70* Years by Hannah Khalil, Tennis in Nablus by Ismail Khalidi, Urge for Going by Mona Mansour, The Victims by Ken Kaissar, and The Zionists by Zohar Tirosh-Polk.

Rather than striving to achieve balance and moral equivalency between “competing” narratives, the plays investigate themes of identity, justice, occupation, exile, history and homeland with honesty and integrity. The plays do not “take sides” or adhere to ideological orthodoxies but challenge tribalism and narrow definitions of nationalism, while varying widely in thematic content, dramatic structure, and time and place.

Where politicians and diplomats fail, artists and storytellers may yet succeed—not in ratifying a peace treaty between Israel and Palestine, but in building the sort of social and political connectivity that enables resolution.

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Newly Published: The Politics of Race, Gender and Sexuality in The Walking Dead

New on our bookshelf today:

The Politics of Race, Gender and Sexuality in The Walking Dead: Essays on the Television Series and Comics
Edited by Elizabeth Erwin and Dawn Keetley

From the beginning, both Robert Kirkman’s comics and AMC’s series of The Walking Dead have brought controversy in their presentations of race, gender and sexuality. Critics and fans have contended that the show’s identity politics have veered toward the decidedly conservative, offering up traditional understandings of masculinity, femininity, heterosexuality, racial hierarchy and white supremacy.

This collection of new essays explores the complicated nature of relationships among the story’s survivors. In the end, characters demonstrate often-surprising shifts that consistently comment on identity politics. Whether agreeing or disagreeing with critics, these essays offer a rich view of how gender, race, class and sexuality intersect in complex new ways in the TV series and comics.

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Newly Published: Bombs, Bullets and Bread

New on our bookshelf today:

Bombs, Bullets and Bread: The Politics of Anarchist Terrorism Worldwide, 1866–1926
Michael Kemp

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a wave of political violence swept across the globe, causing widespread alarm. Described by the media of the day as “propaganda of the deed,” assassinations, bombings and assaults carried out by anarchists—both individuals and conspirators—were intended to incite revolution and established the precedents of modern terrorism. Much has been written about these actions and the responses to them yet little attention has been given to the actors themselves. Drawing on wide range of sources, the author profiles numerous insurgents, their deeds and their motives.

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Four Titles Reviewed in September Issue of Choice

Four new titles are reviewed in the September issue of Choice!

We Rise to Resist: Voices from a New Era in Women’s Political Action
“The volume serves not only as a springboard for classroom discussions but also as a unique documentary source for future generations. We Rise to Resist contextualizes third-wave feminism by highlighting the diversity of women’s experiences while offering a space for reflection and a call for political action…highly recommended.”

The Los Angeles Dodgers Encyclopedia
“Comprehensive…excellent…this is a well-conceived and concise compendium of all things related to this iconic baseball team and an invaluable reference for all libraries…highly recommended.”

Repeating and Multi-Fire Weapons: A History from the Zhuge Crossbow Through the AK-47
“Well illustrated with photographs and diagrams and including a glossary and brief bibliography, this is a thorough treatment the topic and useful for those interested in military history…recommended.”

World Epidemics: A Cultural Chronology of Disease from Prehistory to the Era of Zika, 2d ed.
“Engagingly written…this accessible volume is well suited for popular collections and public libraries…recommended.”

 

 

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Newly Published: Hardcore Horror Cinema in the 21st Century

New on our bookshelf today:

Hardcore Horror Cinema in the 21st Century: Production, Marketing and Consumption
James Aston

The first of its kind, this study examines the exemplars of hardcore horror—Fred Vogel’s August Underground trilogy, Shane Ryan’s Amateur Porn Star Killer series and Lucifer Valentine’s “vomit gore” films.

The author begins with a definition and critical overview of this marginalized subgenre before exploring its key aesthetic convention, the pursuit of realist horror. Production practices, exhibition and marketing strategies are discussed in an in-depth interview with filmmaker Shane Ryan. Audience reception is covered with a focus on fan interaction via the Internet.

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Newly Published: A Lynching in Little Dixie

New on our bookshelf today:

A Lynching in Little Dixie: The Life and Death of James T. Scott, ca. 1885–1923
Patricia L. Roberts

James T. Scott’s 1923 lynching in the college town of Columbia, Missouri, was precipitated by a case of mistaken identity. Falsely accused of rape, the World War I veteran was dragged from jail by a mob and hanged from a bridge before 1000 onlookers.

Patricia L. Roberts lived most of her life unaware that her aunt was the girl who erroneously accused Scott, only learning of it from a 2003 account in the University of Missouri’s school newspaper. Drawing on archival research, she tells Scott’s full story for the first time in the context of the racism of the Jim Crow Midwest.

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Newly Published: Solemn Duty in the Old Guard

New on our bookshelf today:

Solemn Duty in the Old Guard: From Arlington National Cemetery to the Pentagon on 9/11 in America’s Oldest Regiment
Mark Joseph Mongilutz

This candid memoir recounts the author’s nearly four years in the 3rd United States Infantry Regiment—a.k.a. “The Old Guard” or “Escort to the President”—from 2000 to 2004. Beginning with his grueling summertime infantry basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia, he depicts the day-to-day challenges and triumphs of life in the U.S. Army’s oldest and most storied unit, from the 2001 Presidential Inauguration to the recovery efforts following the September 11 attacks.

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Newly Published: Crime Fiction from a Professional Eye

New on our bookshelf today:

Crime Fiction from a Professional Eye: Women Writers with Law Enforcement and Justice Experience
Lili Pâquet

There is a new category of authors blurring the line between fiction and nonfiction: women who work or have worked in criminal justice—lawyers, police officers and forensic investigators—who publish crime fiction with characters that resemble real-life counterparts. Drawing on their professional experience, these writers present compelling portrayals of inequality and dysfunction in criminal justice systems from a feminist viewpoint. This book presents the first examination of the true-crime-infused fiction of authors like Dorothy Uhnak, Kathy Reichs and Linda Fairstein.

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Newly Published: The Ohio Presidents

New on our bookshelf today:

The Ohio Presidents: Eight Men and a Binding Political Philosophy in the White House, 1841–1923
Quentin R. Skrabec, Jr.

Ohio sent eight presidents to the White House—one Whig and seven Republicans—from 1841 to 1923: William Harrison, U.S. Grant, Rutherford Hayes, James Garfield, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, William Taft and Warren Harding. Collectively their social policies and beliefs formed a unified philosophy and legacy.

Ohio republicanism—an alliance of Christianity, populism, nationalism, industrialism and conservative economics—dominated politics across America from 1860 to 1930. Initially several factions in search of a party, it morphed from the anti-slavery Whig Party of Abraham Lincoln and swallowed up a group of single-issue parties, including the Abolition and Free Soil parties, under a national banner. The ghost of Ohio republicanism can still be seen today.

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Newly Published: Worlds Gone Awry

New on our bookshelf today:

Worlds Gone Awry: Essays on Dystopian Fiction
Edited by John J. Han, C. Clark Triplett and Ashley G. Anthony

Dystopian fiction captivates us by depicting future worlds at once eerily similar and shockingly foreign to our own. This collection of new essays presents some of the most recent scholarship on a genre whose popularity has surged dramatically since the 1990s. Contributors explore such novels as The Lord of the FliesThe Heart Goes LastThe Giver and The Strain Trilogy as social critique, revealing how they appeal to the same impulse as utopian fiction: the desire for an idealized yet illusory society in which evil is purged and justice prevails.

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Newly Published: Foreign Language Films and the Oscar

New on our bookshelf today:

Foreign Language Films and the Oscar: The Nominees and Winners, 1948–2017
Michael S. Barrett

The Academy Awards—that yearly Hollywood bash that brings together the glamour and glitz of the international film industry—is highly revered yet has been minimally explored beyond the category of Best Picture. Over the last decade, more than 2,000 films have been submitted for the title of Best Foreign Language Film. Of those, 312—including Italy’s 8 ½, Sweden’s Through a Glass Darkly and Mexico’s Pan’s Labyrinth, as well as Denmark’s lesser-known Harry and the Butler, Yugoslavia’s I Even Met Happy Gypsies and Nicaragua’s Alsino and the Condor—have received nominations.

This guide lists each nominee—from the first-honored Shoeshine in 1948 through Iran’s second Oscar winner, The Salesman, in 2017—chronologically and includes synopses, basic facts about personnel and production qualities, and rankings among annual competitors that often differ from those of the Academy.

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Newly Published: Confederate Prisoners at Fort Delaware

New on our bookshelf today:

Confederate Prisoners at Fort Delaware: The Legend of Mistreatment Reexamined
Joel D. Citron

During the Civil War, each side accused the other of mistreating prisoners of war. Today, most historians believe that there was systemic and deliberate abuse of POWs by both sides yet many base their conclusions on anecdotal evidence, much of it from postwar writings.

Drawing on both contemporaneous prisoner diaries and Union Army documents (some newly discovered), the author presents a fresh and detailed study of supposed mistreatment of prisoners at Fort Delaware—one of the largest Union prison camps—and draws surprising conclusions, some of which have implications for the entire Union prison system.

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Newly Published: New York Yankees Openers

New on our bookshelf today:

New York Yankees Openers: An Opening Day History of Baseball’s Most Famous Team, 1903–2017, 2d ed.
Lyle Spatz

The New York Yankees are baseball’s most storied team. They first played at Hilltop Park, then moved to the Polo Grounds, then Yankee Stadium, Shea Stadium, back to the renovated Yankee Stadium, and now in the new Yankee Stadium.

They also frequently opened the season in Boston’s historic Fenway Park, fondly remembered Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Griffith Stadium in Washington, and all around the expanded leagues after 1961.

This book details every opening-day celebration and game from 1903 to 2017, while noting how each was affected by war, the economy, political and social protest and population shifts. We see presidents and politicians, entertainers, celebrities, and fans, owners, managers, and most of all, the players.

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Newly Published: Finding Monte Cristo

New on our bookshelf today:

Finding Monte Cristo: Alexandre Dumas and the French Atlantic World
Eric Martone

During his lifetime, Alexandre Dumas (1802–1870)—grandson of a Caribbean slave and author of The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo—faced racial prejudice in his homeland of France and constantly strove to find a sense of belonging. For him, “Monte Cristo” was a symbol of this elusive quest.

It proved equally elusive for those struggling to overcome slavery and its legacy in the former French colonies. Exiled to the margins of society, 19th and 20th century black intellectuals from the Caribbean and Africa drew on Dumas’ work and celebrity to renegotiate their full acceptance as French citizens. Their efforts were influenced by earlier struggles of African Americans in the decades after the Civil War, who celebrated Dumas as a black American hero.

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Newly Published: Chasing Dillinger

New on our bookshelf today:

Chasing Dillinger: Police Captain Matt Leach, J. Edgar Hoover and the Rivalry to Capture Public Enemy No. 1
Ellen Poulsen and Lori Hyde

Indiana State Police Captain Matt Leach led the hunt for John Dillinger during the violent early 1930s. Pushing a media campaign aimed at smoking out the fugitive, Leach elevated Dillinger to unprecedented notoriety. In return, Dillinger taunted him with phone calls and postcards, and vowed to kill him. Leach’s use of publicity backfired, making him a pariah among his fellow policemen, and the FBI ordered his firing in 1937 for challenging their authority. This is the first full-length biography of the man.

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Newly Published: The Sex Pistols Invade America

New on our bookshelf today:

The Sex Pistols Invade America: The Fateful U.S. Tour, January 1978
Mick O’Shea

In November 1977, Warner Bros. secured the rights to release the album Never Mind The Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols in America. The following January, the Sex Pistols—already the “scourge” of Britain—were discovered by unsuspecting American audiences in an infamous U.S. tour, accompanied by sensational media coverage and moral panic.

Malcolm McLaren, the band’s manager, eschewed the established rock ‘n’ roll markets of New York and Los Angeles in favor of off-the-radar venues in Memphis, San Antonio and Baton Rouge, sowing the seeds for countercultural clashes in the conservative South. Two weeks later the band split up but punk had invaded mainstream American culture.

Drawing on input from fans, the author chronicles the Pistols’ first and only U.S. tour and separates fact from fallacy in the mythology surrounding those 12 days of mayhem.

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Newly Published: Punching from the Shadows

New on our bookshelf today:

Punching from the Shadows: Memoir of a Minor League Professional Boxer
Glen Sharp

Glen Sharp’s boxing career was a rise-and-fall story without so much rise in it. A sparring partner for light-heavyweight Hall of Famer Yaqui López, he “retired” with a record of one victory and two defeats. A decade later, having come to understand how and why he failed as a younger fighter, he attempted a comeback.

Told with heart and wit, his memoir is a treatise on boxing as both profession and purpose. Sharp uses economic theory to describe the sweet science as a case study in resource management while recounting his own struggle to win fistic glory and his father’s admiration.

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Newly Published: The Union Cavalry and the Chickamauga Campaign

New on our bookshelf today:

The Union Cavalry and the Chickamauga Campaign
Dennis W. Belcher

During the Chickamauga Campaign, General Stanley’s two Union cavalry divisions battled Forrest’s and Wheeler’s cavalry corps in some of the most difficult terrain for mounted operations. The Federal troopers, commanded by Crook and McCook, guarded the flanks of the advance on Chattanooga, secured the crossing of the Tennessee River, then pushed into enemy territory.

The battle exploded on September 18 as Col. Minty and Col. Wilder held off a determined attack by Confederate infantry. The fighting along Chickamauga Creek included notable actions at Glass Mill and Cooper’s Gap. Union cavalry dogged Wheeler’s forces throughout Tennessee. The Union troopers fought under conditions so dusty they could hardly see, leading the infantry through the second costliest battle of the war.

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New in Softcover: Reuben Fine

Now available in softcover:

Reuben Fine: A Comprehensive Record of an American Chess Career, 1929–1951
Aidan Woodger

American Grandmaster Reuben Fine grew up in the East Bronx in an impoverished Russian-Jewish family, learning to play chess from an uncle at the age of eight. During his high school years, his stake winnings and coins earned from playing at a Coney Island concession helped support his family. After graduating from college, he decided to become a professional player. Though his active international career was brief, his accomplishment and talent are unmistakably significant. This comprehensive collection of 659 of Reuben Fine’s tournament and match games is presented chronologically, in context, and with annotations from contemporary sources. More than 180 other games and game fragments (rapid transit, correspondence, exhibition, blitz, and others) are also included. The work also includes a biography of Fine, and notes aspects of his career that merit further study: his contribution to endgame and middlegame theory, his methods and style of play, and his exhibition play. Fine’s career results, brief biographical data about his opponents, a comprehensive bibliography that includes his contributions to journals, and indexes of players and of openings complete the work.

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Newly Published: Young Adult Literature in the Composition Classroom

New on our bookshelf today:

Young Adult Literature in the Composition Classroom: Essays on Practical Application
Edited by Tamara Girardi and Abigail G. Scheg

Young adult literature holds an exceptional place in modern American popular culture. Accessible to readers of all levels, it captures a diverse audience and tends to adapt to the big screen in an exciting way. With its wide readership, YAL sparks interesting discussions inside and outside of the classroom. This collection of new essays examines how YAL has impacted college composition courses, primarily focusing on the first year. Contributors discuss popular YA stories, their educational potential, and possibilities for classroom discussion and exercise.

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Weekly Kindle Spotlight: August 20th

The Amazin’ Mets, 1962–1969Love ebooks? Get these popular titles for 3.99 on Amazon Kindle through August 31st.

The Amazin’ Mets, 1962-1969

Going to Pieces: The Rise and Fall of the Slasher Film, 1978-1986

Latin American Popular Culture

Governor’s Houses and State Houses of British Colonial American, 1607-1783

George Washington and the Final British Campaign for the Hudson River, 1779

The American Novel of War: A Critical Analysis and Classification System

The Allied Defense of the Malay Barrier 1941-1942

The Coltrane Church: Apostles of Sound, Agents of Social Justice

Encyclopedia of Ghosts and Spirits in World Mythology

The Corpse: A History

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Newly Published: Alternate Worlds

New on our bookshelf today:

Alternate Worlds: The Illustrated History of Science Fiction, 3d ed.
James Gunn

Alternate Worlds was first published in 1975 and became an instant classic, winning a Hugo award. This third edition brings the history of science fiction up to date, covering developments over the past forty years—a period that has seen the advent of technologies only imagined in the genre’s Golden Age.

As a literature of change, science fiction has become ever more meaningful, presaging dangers to humanity and, as Alvin Toffler wrote, guarding against “the premature arrival of the future.” The world has begun to recognize science fiction in many different ways, incorporating its elements in products, visual media and huge conventions.

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Newly Published: The Muslim World in Post–9/11 American Cinema

New on our bookshelf today:

The Muslim World in Post–9/11 American Cinema: A Critical Study, 2001–2011
Kerem Bayraktaroğlu

Focusing on the decade following 9/11, this critical analysis examines the various portrayals of Muslims in American cinema. Comparison of pre– and post–9/11 films indicates a stereotype shift, influenced by factors other than just politics. The evolving definitions of male, female and child characters and of setting and landscape are described. The rise of the formidable American female character who dominates the weak Muslim male emerges as a common theme.

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Newly Published: The Hero and the Grave

New on our bookshelf today:

The Hero and the Grave: The Theme of Death in the Films of John Ford, Akira Kurosawa and Sergio Leone
Alireza Vahdani

The theme of death is an essential component of film narrative, particularly in how it affects the hero. Filmmakers from different cultures and backgrounds have developed distinct yet archetypal perspectives on death and the protagonist’s response. Focusing on Western and Japanese period genre films, the author examines the work of John Ford (1894–1973), Akira Kurosawa (1910–1998) and Sergio Leone (1929–1989) and finds similarities regarding death’s impact on the hero’s sense of morality.

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Newly Published: Carolina Beach Music Encyclopedia

New on our bookshelf today:

Carolina Beach Music Encyclopedia
Rick Simmons

While rock groups such as the Beach Boys and Jan and Dean defined the beach music of Southern California during the 1960s, a different, R&B influenced sound could be heard along South Carolina’s Grand Strand. Drawing on extensive research and exclusive interviews, this richly illustrated reference work covers the music, songwriters and performers who contributed to the genre of classic Carolina beach music from 1940 to 1980. Detailed entries tell the stories behind nearly 500 classic recordings, with release dates, label information, chart performance and biographical background on more than 200 artists.

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ERRATA: Reuben Fine: A Comprehensive Record of an American Chess Career, 1929–1951 by Aidan Woodger

NOTES CONCERNING THE 2018 PAPERBACK EDITION

I have continued to collect data (previously unknown games, notes and biographical information) for inclusion in a possible future revised edition of this work, Reuben Fine: A Comprehensive Record of an American Chess Career, 1929–1951. There are still considerable gaps in the record, particularly from the early years of Fine’s career and after the notebooks come to an end. I am happy to receive and acknowledge contributions which fill these lacunae. I remain contactable through the publisher, McFarland.

Aidan Woodger, August 2018

 

MINOR CORRECTIONS
iv for 1. Fine, Reuben, 1914- read 1. Fine, Reuben, 1914-1993
3 for Moby Dick read Moby-Dick
7 for candidates tournament read candidates’ tournament
13 for Rice Club Junior Masters read Rice Club Junior Masters (?)
32 for Marshall Clubs read Marshall Club
41 game 116 undo italicization of Aug.
42 game 120 add (Aug.) after 1933
43 game 121 result should read 0-1
43 for New York Sun, August 1933 read New York Sun, 1933
48 for 11.1933 read 1933 (Nov.)
52 for Fine 1 1 ½ ½ 0 ? ? ? 0 4 read Fine 1 1 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 4
52 for Denker 0 0½ ½ 1 ? ? ? 1 5 read Denker 0 0½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 5
61 game 183 for Marshall CC vs. Mercantile Library CC, Marshall Club, New York read Marshall CC vs. Mercantile Library CC, Franklin Hotel, Philadelphia
62 games 184 and 185 for (Nov.) read (Nov. ?) and undo italicization
69 for Hilbert & Lahde, 54-5. ½ read ½ Hilbert & Lahde, 54-5.
70 for 15…Nxf3 read 16…Nxf3
74 for 0-1 White resigned. read White resigned 0-1
80 for 35 Nxa4 Rxc7 36 Nxb6 read 35 Kxa4 Rxc7 36 Kb5
84 for 18. Rfd8 read 18. Rcd8
85 for 21. Bf1 Rf8 read 21. Bf1 Rc8; for 23. Qa4 Rfd8 read 23. Qa4 Rcd8
92 for in the previous diagram read after move 49
97 for 13 Bd5 Nd4 14 Qg4 read 13 Bd5 Nd4 14 Qh5
100 for 13…Nxd5 13 Nxd5 exd5 read 12…Nxd5 13 Nxd5 exd5
102 for 9…Bc5 10 Nd4 read 9…Bb4 10 Nd4
109 for B. h2 h6 read B. 42 h2 h6
121 for 20.Qa4?! read 20.Ba4
128 for 12 Bxc4 Qc7 wins a pawn (13 Qb3 Ne5) read 11 Bxc4 Qc7 wins a pawn (12 Qb3 Ne5)
144 for the Ukraine read Ukraine
149 for 18 Rxf4 Qxg4 read 18 Rf4 Qxg4
154 for 11 Qxe5 Re8 Qb2 read 11 Qxe5 Re8 12 Qb2
186 for Threatening 23…Bb6 read Threatening 23…Bb3
187 for 30…Rc1 31 Nxb3 was also very good. HK 31 Nxf5 read 30…Rc1 31 Nxf5 31 Nxb3 was also very good. HK
189 his opponent’s centre
193 for 25 Bxg7 Bxf1 Be5 read 25 Bxg7 Bxf1 26 Be5
197 for 23 Bxc6 bxc6 Na7 read 23 Bxc6 bxc6 24 Na7
200 for Black resigned. Fine in The Chess Review 1938, 139-40. 1-0 read Black resigned. 1-0 Fine in The Chess Review 1938, 139-40.
205 place 17 Qxb5 …AW in parentheses () and replace 17 Qxb5 with 17…Qxb5
205 for 8…Nge7 9 Nd6+ Kf8 10 Qf4 Nf5 11 Nxf6!? Read 8…Nge7 9 Nd6+ Kf8 10 Qf4 Nf5 11 Nxf7!?
206 for Capablanca – Ståhlberg read Ståhlberg – Capablanca
207 for 45 Bxb7 Kxa2 46 Bxc6 Kxb3 47 c1 a4 read 45 Bxb7 Kxa2 46 Bxc6 Kxb3 47 Kf1 a4
209 for Tartakower give read Tartakower gave
222 for 25.07.1939 read 1939 (25 July)
222 for 17 Qb1 read 17 Qc1
224 entries in table should read:
2  Hanauer       0 * ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 13
8  Green                       1 0 1 0 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 9
9= Bernstein     0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 8½
9= Donovan     0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ * 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 8½
12 Sanatasiere  0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 * ½ 1 ½ 0 1 7
226 for Now White must not read Now Black must not
228 for Safonov – Bohatirchuk read Savonov – Bogatirev
233 for (In view of unavoidable mate, Black resigned.) Based on notes by Reinfeld in Chess Review, May-June 1940 (Hilbert 2002a, 126-7). 1–0 read (In view of unavoidable mate, Black resigned.) 1–0 Based on notes by Reinfeld in Chess Review, May-June 1940 (Hilbert 2002a, 126-7).
233 for strategem read stratagem
238 for U.S. F read U.S.C.F.
240 for 24.08.1940 read 1940
250 for Queen’s Gambit Declined read Catalan Opening
251 for Williams, M read Williams, Mrs. R
266 for Reshevky read Reshevsky
271 for Black resigned read White resigned.
273 for to strong read too strong
275 for may 1944 read May 1944
278 for Team Match Washington, (1944) read 13th McCoy-Hatfield Match, Divan CC, Washington, 1944 (7 June)
278 for Exhibition Game Washington read Exhibition Game, Washington
280 for 5.Qxc4Be6 read 5.Qxc4 Be6
280 for 17.Nb3 18.Bg3 read 17.Nb3 Ne6 18.Bg3; for 129.Qf2 read 29.Qf2; for 50.Kd3 51.f4+ read 50.Kd3 Nc7 51.f4+
282 for Broderman :50)1-0 read Broderman :50) 1-0
284 for Fine 1:58)0-1 read Fine 1:58) 0-1
291 for 20.Qc2 d5 21.Rab1 read 20.Qe2 d5 21.Rac1
300 for 41 Ne5 g5 read 41 Ne5 g4
301 for 45.Nd6 Ke5 44.Nc4+ Kd5 read 45.Nd6 Ke6 44.Nc4 Kd5
301 for Match New York (4) read Match New Jersey (4); and for Match New York (7) read Match New Jersey (7)
305 for If 10 h6 read If 10…h6
311 for On 26…Rxd8 27 Be2 read On 26…Rd8 27 Be2
325 for Los Angeles Times, 15 September, 1940. ½-½ read ½-½ Los Angeles Times, 15 September, 1940.
348 for Issak read Isaak
351 for ben-factor read benefactor
352 for Montgomery read Montgomerie (same pages 379 and 388)
354 for Oympiads read Olympiads; for indivdual read individual
357 for Metropolitan League, April 1933 read Metropolitan League, April 1934
363 for contibuted read contributed; for Wasy read Way
365 for a number of position read a number of positions; for [email protected] read [email protected].uk
367 for visuaslize read visualize
370 for Artur read Arthur
371 for against Against read against
372 for reseachers read researchers
380 for Reshevsky, S 60, 61, 128, 168 read Reshevsky, S 60, 61, 128, 169
383 for Fedration read Federation
389 for Kers read Keres
391 for the Ukraine read Ukraine
Znosko-Borovsky for Znovsko-Borovsky

FURTHER READING (ADDENDA TO BIBLIOGRAPHY)

1932 Pasadena: Sherwood, Brandreth & Monson (2011) Pasadena 1932 International Chess Tournament Yorklyn, DE: Caissa Editions

1938 A.V.R.O: Sherwood and Brandreth (2010) AVRO 1938 International Chess Tournament Yorklyn, DE: Caissa Editions

G.G. Toradze (ed) (2006) AVRO-Turnir: Coctyazanie cil’neyshikh grossmeysterov mira Gollandia, 1938 god Moscow, Galeriya

1939 23rd Marshall Club championship Croxen (2006) “The Russian myth of Lasker’s last tournament” in Quarterly for Chess History 12 7-21

Apsenieks Salmins, G Fricis Apsenieks 1894-1941 (2006) Liepaja

Fine Ansel “Unknown games of Reuben Fine” Quarterly for Chess History 16 486-502; Kasparov, G with the participation of Plisetsky, D (2004) “The Fine enigma” in Garry Kasparov on Fischer: My Great Predecessors Part IV London: Everyman Chess

Kashdan Lahde, P (2009) Isaac Kashdan, American Chess Grandmaster: A career summary with 757 games Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company

Najdorf Lissowski, T Mikhalchisin, A & Najdorf, L with notes by Najdorf, M (2005) Najdorf: life and games London: Batsford

Petrovs Fride, A (2004) Vladimirs Petrovs: a chessplayer’s story from greatness to the gulags Yorklyn, DE: Caissa Editions

Thomas, George Paige, R (2005) The Chess Games of Sir George Alan Thomas Liskeard: Diggory Press

Angos, Dr. A (2007) Castles with Knights and Bishops Impala Press

Euwe, M (English edition, 2013) The Hague-Moscow 1948: match/tournament for the World Chess Championship Russell Enterprises: Milford CT

Fine, R 1965 The Teenage Chess Book New York

Hearst, E & Knott, J (2009) Blindfold Chess: history, psychology, techniques, champions, world records and important games Jefferson, NC: McFarland

Lombardy, W (2012) Understanding Chess: my system, my games, my life New York: Lombardy/Russell Enterprises

Tkachenko, S (2017) Odesskie Taynuy Moscow: Andrei Elkov

Tkachenko, S (2018) Alekhine’s Odessa Secrets Great Britain (Amazon): Elk and Ruby

Suetin, A 2010 Soviet Chess Strategy Glasgow: Quality Chess

Ansel, A 2011’Unknown games of Reuben Fine’ in Quarterly for Chess History 16, 486-502

 

ADDITIONAL GAMES

() Denker, Arnold Sheldon – Fine

Denker-Fine Match, New York (5), 1934
Two Knights Defence [C56]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.0–0 Nxe4 6.Re1 d5 7.Bxd5 Qxd5 8.Nc3 Qd8 The usual move is 8…Qa5, which is considered even. LP 9.Rxe4+ Be7 10.Nxd4 f5! On a score sheet sent to this writer, GM Denker gave Black’s last move a “?”, but ECO (C/56) gives it an “!”. LP 11.Rxe7+ The known move here is Hartlaub’s 11 Bh6, when Perfiliev – Botvinnik (Leningrad, 1925) continued 11…fxe4 12 Bxg7 Nxd4 13 Qh5+ Kd7 14 Bxd4 Rf8, and Black consolidated to victory. However, according to Robert Wade, White could have gained a perpetual by 14 Rd1 Bf6 15 Qd5+. Mestel – Bronstein (London, 1976) followed the saner 11 Bh6 0–0 which proved even after 12 Nxc6 bxc6 13 Rd4 Qe8 14 Bf4 Bf6 15 Rd3 Qf7! – but not 15…Rf7? 16 Re3 Re7 17 Nd5! Rxe3 18 Nxf6+ gxf6 19 Bxe3, when White won easily in Schmid – Hooper (Hastings 1951). LP 11…Nxe7 12.Bg5 0–0 (According to Parr, Fritz recommended 12…c6, but this loses to 13 Qh5+ g6 14 Qh4. AW) 13.Ndb5 Qxd1+ 14.Rxd1 Ng6 15.Nxc7 Rb8 16.h4 h6 (Junior 9 recommends 16…f4! 17 N7d5 Be6 18 h5 Rf5 19 hxg6 Rxg5. AW) 17.h5 hxg5 18.hxg6 b6 19.N3d5 Rb7 20.f4 g4?? A horrendous blunder. Black had to play 20…Rxc7, when White has a better endgame. LP 21.Ne7+ Kh8 22.Kf2 1–0 Larry Parr ‘Grandmaster Arnold Denker (1914-2005) “The man whom chess loved”’, Chess Life March 2005, 14–15 (166-7).

() Fine – Denker, Arnold Sheldon

Denker-Fine Match, New York (6), 1934
Sicilian Defence, Paulsen Variation [B45]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Ndb5 Bb4 7.a3 Bxc3+ 8.Nxc3 d5 9.exd5 exd5 10.Bd3 0–0 11.0–0 d4 12.Ne2 Nd5 13.Be4!? Re8 14.Bxd5?! Qxd5 15.c3?! Bg4 16.f3 d3 17.Nf4 Qc5+ 18.Kh1 Bf5 19.Nxd3 Bxd3?! 20.Qxd3 Rad8 21.Qc2 Nd4 22.Qf2 Re2 23.Qh4 Ne6 24.Bf4 Qc4 25.Bg3 Qxh4 26.Bxh4 Rdd2 27.Rg1 Rxb2 Black won on move 43. 0–1 Larry Parr ‘Grandmaster Arnold Denker (1914-2005) “The man whom chess loved”’, Chess Life March 2005, 14–15 (166-7).

() Fine – Jonsson, Emil

Match vs Emil Jonsson, Stockholm (1), 1937
Reti Opening [A09]

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 e6 3.Bg2 c5 4.0–0 Nc6 5.c4 d4 6.d3 Nf6 7.e3 Be7 8.exd4 cxd4 9.Re1 0–0 10.Nbd2 Qb6 11.b3 Bd7 12.a3 a5 13.Bb2 Rfe8 14.Rc1 Bc5 15.Ng5 h6 16.Nge4 Nxe4 17.Nxe4 e5 18.Nxc5 Qxc5 19.Rb1 Rab8 20.b4 axb4 21.axb4 Qxb4 22.Bxd4 Qd6 23.Bc3 Bf5 24.Re3 f6 25.Rb5 Be6 26.Qb1 Re7 27.Rb6 Qa3 28.d4 exd4 29.Bxd4 Qd6 30.Bxc6 1–0 ChessBase

() Jonsson, Emil – Fine

Match vs Emil Jonsson, Stockholm (2), 1937
Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D27]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 a6 5.a4 e6 6.e3 c5 7.Bxc4 Nc6 8.0–0 Be7 9.Bd3 0–0 10.dxc5 Bxc5 11.e4 Qc7 12.Bg5 Ng4 13.Bh4 Nge5 14.Nxe5 Nxe5 15.Rc1 Qb6 16.Bb1 f6 17.Nd5 Qa5 18.Rxc5 Qxc5 19.b4 Qa7 20.Ne7+ Kh8 21.Kh1 b5 22.f4 Ng6 23.Nxg6+ hxg6 24.f5 exf5 25.exf5 Bxf5 26.Rxf5 gxf5 27.Qh5+ Kg8 28.Bxf5 g5 29.Be6+ Kg7 30.Bxg5 Rh8 31.Qg4 Rxh2+ 32.Kxh2 fxg5 33.Qxg5+ Kh8 34.Bf5 Qc7+ 35.g3 ½–½ ChessBase

() Fine – Fox, A

Clock exhibition Washington D.C., 10.11.1943
Queen’s Gambit Declined [D06]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 Bf5 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Qb3 Nc6 6.c5 Qd7 7.Bf4 Be7 8.e3 a6 9.Be2 0–0 10.0–0 Rab8 11.Qd1 Qc8 12.Rc1 Nh5 13.a3 Nxf4 14.exf4 Bf6 15.b4 Qd8 16.Qd2 Bg4 17.Ne5 Bxe2 18.Nxe2 Bxe5 19.fxe5 Ne7 20.f4 c6 21.g4 g6 22.Ng3 Kh8 23.Rc3 Rg8 24.Rcf3 Qf8 25.Kh1 Qh6 26.Qg2 Rbf8 27.Qf2 Qg7 28.f5 gxf5 29.gxf5 exf5 30.Nxf5 Nxf5 31.Rxf5 Qg6 32.Rg1 Qxg1+ 33.Qxg1 Rxg1+ 34.Kxg1 Kg7 35.Rf6 Re8 36.Rd6 Re7 37.Kf2 Kf8 38.Kf3 Re6 39.Rd8+ Re8 40.Rxe8+ Kxe8 41.Kg4 Kf8 42.Kg5 Kg7 43.h3 Kf8 44.Kf6 h6 45.h4 Ke8 46.Kg7 Ke7 47.Kxh6 f6 48.exf6+ Kxf6 49.h5 Kf7 50.Kg5 Kg7 51.h6+ Kh7 52.Kh5 Kg8 53.Kg6 Kh8 54.h7 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 500 from The Divan News December 1943.

() Fine – Korsstrom, L

Clock exhibition Washington D.C., 10.11.1943
Spanish Game [C86]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Qe2 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.a4 Bg4 9.c3 Rb8 10.Rd1 0–0 11.d4 Na5 12.Bc2 Nc4 13.b3 Nb6 14.dxe5 Nfd7 15.axb5 Nxe5 16.bxa6 Bf6 17.Nbd2 Nxf3+ 18.Nxf3 Bxc3 19.Rb1 Qe7 20.Be3 Nd7 21.h3 Bh5 22.g4 Bg6 23.Bd4 Bb4 24.Qc4 c5 25.Bb2 h5 26.Kg2 Nb6 27.Qe2 d5 28.Ne5 hxg4 29.hxg4 Rbe8 30.f4 Bxe4+ 31.Bxe4 dxe4 32.Rh1 Nd5 33.Qxe4 Nf6 34.Rh3 Nxe4 35.Rbh1 g6 36.Rh8+ Kg7 37.Nd7+ 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 500 from The Divan News December 1943.

() Fine – Klein, H

December rapids Washington D.C., 15.12.1943
Queen’s Gambit Declined [D50]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 c6 5.e4 dxe4 6.Nxe4 Bb4+ 7.Nc3 Qa5 8.Bd2 Nbd7 9.Nf3 Qc7 10.Bd3 h6 11.0–0 0–0 12.Re1 Re8 13.Qe2 Nf8 14.Ne5 Qd8 15.Rad1 Bd6 16.Qf3 Qe7 17.Qg3 Kh8 18.Nxf7+ Qxf7 19.Qxd6 Bd7 20.Ne4 Rad8 21.Qg3 Qh5 22.Nd6 Re7 23.f3 Bc8 24.h4 Red7 25.c5 b6 26.Re5 g5 27.hxg5 hxg5 28.Bxg5 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 500–501 from The Divan News January 1944.

() Fine – Skraly, E

December rapids Washington D.C., 15.12.1943
Sicilian Defence [B81]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.g4 Be7 7.g5 Nfd7 8.Qh5 Ne5 9.f4 Nec6 10.Be3 g6 11.Qe2 f6 12.h4 Nxd4 13.Bxd4 Nc6 14.Be3 Rf8 15.0–0–0 Bd7 16.h5 fxg5 17.hxg6 hxg6 18.Qg4 Qa5 19.Bc4 gxf4 20.Bxf4 0–0–0 21.Bd2 Ne5 22.Qe2 Nxc4 23.Qxc4+ Kb8 24.Rh7 Bf6 25.Qb3 Bc8 26.Nd5 Qc5 27.Be3 Qc6 28.Nxf6 Rxf6 29.Bg5 Qxe4 30.Qc3 Rf3 31.Qc7+ Ka8 32.Qxd8 Qc4 33.Rc7 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 501 from The Divan News January 1944.

() Fine – Denker, Arnold

National Rapid Transit preliminaries New York, 25.06.1944
Queen’s Gambit Declined [D53]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.e3 Be7 6.Nf3 Ne4 7.Bxe7 Qxe7 8.cxd5 Nxc3 9.bxc3 exd5 10.Qb3 c6 11.Bd3 0–0 12.0–0 Kh8 13.Rae1 Nf6 14.Nd2 Qc7 15.f3 Be6 16.Qb2 Rad8 17.e4 c5 18.e5 Ng8 19.f4 f5 20.exf6 Rxf6 21.Nf3 Rdf8 22.g3 c4 23.Bxh7 Bh3 24.Bb1 Bxf1 25.Rxf1 Rh6 26.Ne5 Qb6 27.Qc2 Ne7 28.Nd7 Qd8 29.Nxf8 Qxf8 30.Qe2 Nf5 31.Qe5 Rf6 32.Re1 Nd6 33.Qxd5 b5 34.Re5 Rh6 35.Rh5 Nf7 36.Rxh6+ gxh6 37.Qf5 Qg7 38.Qxb5 Kg8 39.Qxc4 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 502 from The Divan News July 1 1944.

() Fine – Lasker, Edward

National Rapid Transit, New York, 1944 (25 June)
Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D26]

1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e6 4.Bxc4 c5 5.0–0 Nc6 6.d4 cxd4 7.exd4 Nf6 8.Nc3 a6 9.Be3 b5 10.Bd3 Nb4 11.Bb1 Bb7 12.Ne5 Nbd5 13.Qf3 Qc7 14.Qh3 Nxc3 15.bxc3 Bd6 16.Bd3 Bxe5 17.dxe5 Nd7 18.f4 Qxc3 19.Rad1 Nc5 20.Bb1 Ne4 21.Rd4 Nc5 22.Rc1 Qa3 23.Qg3 0–0 24.f5 Rac8 25.f6 g6 26.Qf4 Kh8 27.Qh6 Qxc1+ 28.Bxc1 1–0 Andy Ansel in Quarterly for Chess History 16, 502 from The Divan News, 1 July, 1944.

() Cheney, R – Fine

Special rapid Washington D.C., 30.09.1944
King’s Indian Defence [A48]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.Bf4 Bg7 4.c3 0–0 5.e3 d6 6.Be2 Nbd7 7.h3 b6 8.Nbd2 Bb7 9.0–0 Nd5 10.Bg3 e5 11.c4 Ne7 12.d5 h6 13.e4 f5 14.Bd3 Qe8 15.Qc2 f4 16.Bh2 g5 17.b4 Qg6 18.Kh1 h5 19.Rg1 g4 20.hxg4 hxg4 21.Nh4 Qh5 22.g3 f3 23.Nf1 Ng6 24.Ne3 Bf6 25.Nef5 Kf7 26.Qd2 Rh8 27.Rac1 Nxh4 28.gxh4 Bxh4 29.Rc3 Bg5 30.Qe1 Qxh2# 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 493 from The Divan News November 1944.

() Fine – Johnson, R

Special rapid Washington D.C., 30.09.1944
[A25]

1.e3 e5 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 Nc6 4.g3 Nf6 5.Bg2 Be7 6.f4 0–0 7.Nf3 exf4 8.gxf4 Bg4 9.0–0 d5 10.cxd5 Nxd5 11.Qe1 Nf6 12.Qg3 Qd3 13.Ne5 Qf5 14.e4 Qh5 15.Nxc6 bxc6 16.d4 Be2 17.Nxe2 Qxe2 18.Be3 Rab8 19.b3 Nh5 20.Qh3 g6 21.f5 Qd3 22.Rad1 Qa6 23.Bh6 Rfe8 24.fxg6 hxg6 25.Qf3 Bf6 26.e5 Kh7 27.Bc1 Bg7 28.Qxf7 Rf8 29.Qe6 Rfe8 30.Qg4 Qxa2 31.Be4 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 494 from The Divan News November 1944.

() Fine – Turover, I

Special rapid Washington D.C., 30.09.1944
Three Knights Opening [C46]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 d6 4.d4 Bg4 5.Bb5 Nf6 6.dxe5 dxe5 7.Qxd8+ Kxd8 8.Bxc6 Bxf3 9.Bxb7 Bxg2 10.Bxa8 Bxh1 11.Ke2 Bb4 12.Be3 Ke7 13.Bc6 Bxc3 14.Bc5+ Ke6 15.Rxh1 Bd4 16.Ba3 Rb8 17.c3 Bb6 18.Rd1 g6 19.Kf3 a5 20.Ba4 Ba7 21.Bb3+ Rxb3 22.axb3 Nh5 23.Rd8 c5 24.Ra8 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 494 from The Divan News November 1944.

() Fine – Berliner, Hans

Simul Washington D.C., 08.11.1944
English Opening [A32]

1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Bb4 6.e3 0–0 7.Bd3 d5 8.0–0 Nc6 9.cxd5 exd5 10.Nce2 Re8 11.Bd2 Bd6 12.h3 Ne5 13.Bc2 Ne4 14.Be1 Bd7 15.Nf4 Nf6 16.Bc3 b5 17.Nf5 Bxf5 18.Bxf5 Bc7 19.Rc1 g6 20.Bb1 Rc8 21.Qb3 g5 22.Ne2 Qd6 23.Ng3 a5 24.Rfd1 b4 25.Bd4 Nc4 26.Qd3 Ne4 27.Nxe4 dxe4 28.Qxc4 Qh2+ 29.Kf1 Qh1+ 30.Ke2 Qxg2 31.Rg1 Qf3+ 32.Ke1 Bg3 33.Rxg3 Rxc4 34.Rxc4 Qh1+ 35.Kd2 Qxb1 36.Rxg5+ Kf8 37.Bc5+ Re7 38.Rc2 Qf1 39.Bxe7+ Kxe7 40.Re5+ Kd6 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 495 from The Divan News, December 1944.

() Fine – Leithiser, H

Simul Washington D.C., 08.11.1944
Sicilian Dragon [B34]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.0–0 Nxe4 8.Nxc6 Nxc3 9.Nxd8 Nxd1 10.Nxf7 Nc3 11.Bc4 d5 12.Nxh8 dxc4 13.bxc3 Bxc3 14.Rb1 Bxh8 15.Ba3 a6 16.Rfe1 Bf6 17.Rb6 Kf7 18.Bc5 Rb8 19.Reb1 Be5 20.Bxe7 Bc7 21.Bd6 Bxd6 22.Rxd6 b5 23.Rd8 Ra8 24.Re1 Bb7 25.Rd7+ Kg8 26.Rxb7 Rd8 27.g3 Rd2 28.Re8# 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 494-5 from The Divan News, December 1944.

() Fine – Mugridge, Donald

Simul Washington D.C., 08.11.1944
English Opening [A20]

1.c4 e5 2.Nf3 e4 3.Nd4 Nc6 4.Nxc6 dxc6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.g3 Bc5 7.Bg2 0–0 8.0–0 Bf5 9.Kh1 Qd4 10.f3 exf3 11.Rxf3 Bg6 12.Rf4 Ng4 13.Qf1 Nf2+ 14.Rxf2 Qxf2 15.Qxf2 Bxf2 16.e3 Rad8 17.Bf3 Rfe8 18.Kg2 Be1 19.d4 c5 20.Bxb7 cxd4 21.exd4 Rxd4 22.Bc6 Re7 23.Bg5 f6 24.Bf4 Bxc3 25.bxc3 Be4+ 0–1 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 495 from The Divan News, December 1944.

() Fine – Turover, I

Blindfold clock simul Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
Scandinavian Defence [B01]

1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.Bb5+ Bd7 4.Bc4 Bg4 5.f3 Bf5 6.Nc3 Nbd7 7.d6 exd6 8.d4 Nb6 9.Bd3 Bxd3 10.Qxd3 d5 11.Nge2 c6 12.Ng3 Bd6 13.Nf5 0–0 14.0–0 Re8 15.Bg5 Bf8 16.f4 h6 17.Bh4 Nbd7 18.Rad1 Qb6 19.b3 g6 20.Ne3 Nc5 21.Qe2 Nce4 22.Nxe4 Nxe4 23.Qd3 Qb4 24.f5 Qc3 25.fxg6 fxg6 26.Ng4 Bg7 27.Bf6 Qxd3 28.Rxd3 Rf8 29.Bxg7 Rxf1+ 30.Kxf1 Kxg7 31.Ke1 Rf8 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 496 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Burdge, H

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
[D03]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bg5 Bf5 4.e3 e6 5.Bd3 Bg6 6.Nc3 Nbd7 7.Ne5 Be7 8.f4 0–0 9.0–0 Nxe5 10.fxe5 Nd7 11.Bf4 c5 12.Bxg6 hxg6 13.Qd3 a6 14.Rf3 b5 15.Raf1 Rc8 16.Ne2 Qc7 17.c3 b4 18.e4 dxe4 19.Qxe4 cxd4 20.Nxd4 bxc3 21.bxc3 Qc4 22.R1f2 Nb6 23.Bd2 Qd5 24.Qxd5 Nxd5 25.Kf1 Bc5 26.Be1 Bxd4 27.cxd4 Rc4 28.Ra3 Ra8 29.Rd2 a5 30.Rb3 Rac8 31.Rb7 a4 32.Ra7 Ne3+ 33.Kf2 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 496-7 from The Divan News February 1945

() Fine – Johnson, R

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
Bishop’s Opening [C23]

1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 b5 3.Bxb5 Bc5 4.Nf3 Qf6 5.0–0 Ne7 6.c3 Qb6 7.Bc4 Ng6 8.d4 exd4 9.cxd4 Be7 10.Nc3 c6 11.d5 0–0 12.e5 Ba6 13.Qe2 Re8 14.Be3 Qb7 15.dxc6 dxc6 16.Rfd1 Nf8 17.Rd2 Bxc4 18.Qxc4 Nbd7 19.Rad1 Nb6 20.Qg4 Qa6 21.b3 Qa5 22.Ne4 Nd5 23.Bd4 Ne6 24.h4 Bb4 25.Rc2 Rac8 26.h5 Qd8 27.Rcc1 a5 28.Bb2 Kh8 29.h6 Rg8 30.Nd6 Bxd6 31.exd6 Nf6 32.hxg7+ 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 496 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Kurtz, M

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
Catalan Opening [E01]

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Qa4+ Qd7 6.Qxc4 Qc6 7.Nbd2 Qxc4 8.Nxc4 c5 9.Bg2 Nc6 10.dxc5 Bxc5 11.a3 0–0 12.b4 Be7 13.b5 Nb8 14.a4 Nbd7 15.0–0 Nc5 16.Ba3 Re8 17.a5 Bd7 18.Nd4 Rad8 19.a6 b6 20.Ne5 Nd5 21.Ndc6 Bxc6 22.Nxc6 Rd7 23.Rac1 Bd6 24.Rfd1 Nb3 25.Rb1 Bxa3 26.Rxb3 Bc5 27.Rbd3 Rc7 28.Bxd5 exd5 29.e3 Kf8 30.Rxd5 f6 31.Rd7 Rcc8 32.Rxa7 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 497 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Shapiro, Oscar

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
English Opening [A22]

1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.d3 b6 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.e3 d6 6.Be2 Be7 7.d4 0–0 8.0–0 Bb7 9.b3 Qd7 10.Bb2 exd4 11.Nxd4 Nxd4 12.Qxd4 Qf5 13.Rad1 Rfd8 14.Nd5 Qd7 15.Bf3 Bxd5 16.cxd5 a5 17.Rc1 Rdb8 18.Rxc7?? Qxc7 0–1 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 497 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Stark, Martin

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
Queen’s Gambit, Slav Defence [D15]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 dxc4 5.e3 b5 6.a4 b4 7.Nb1 e6 8.Bxc4 Nbd7 9.0–0 Bb7 10.Qe2 c5 11.Rd1 Qc7 12.Nbd2 Be7 13.a5 0–0 14.Bd3 Rfd8 15.Nc4 Ng4 16.h3 Ngf6 17.Bd2 Be4 18.Rac1 Qb7 19.Bxe4 Nxe4 20.Be1 Qa6 21.Qc2 Ndf6 22.Nfe5 cxd4 23.exd4 Rdc8 24.Qa4 Nd5 25.Qb3 Nef6 26.Rc2 Rc7 27.Rdc1 Rac8 28.Qd3 h6 29.b3 Qb5 30.Nxf7 Nf4 31.Qf3 Nxh3+ 32.Qxh3 Kxf7 33.Ne5+ 1–0 Ansel QCH 16, 497 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Egan, R

Blindfold rapid exhibition Washington D.C., 25.04.1945
[A52]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 Ng4 4.Bf4 Bb4+ 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Nf3 Qe7 7.Qd5 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 Qa3 9.Qd2 Qe7 10.Qd5 Qa3 11.Rc1 f6 12.exf6 Nxf6 13.Qd2 d6 14.e3 0–0 15.Bd3 Bg4 16.Nd4 Nxd4 17.cxd4 Rae8 18.0–0 Nh5 19.Bg3 Nxg3 20.hxg3 Qa4 21.Qc2 Qxc2 22.Rxc2 Bc8 23.Be2 c6 24.Rd1 Re7 25.Bf3 Bf5 26.Rb2 g5 27.g4 Bc8 28.Re1 Be6 29.d5 cxd5 30.cxd5 Bf7 31.Rc1 Bg6 32.Rb4 Kg7 33.Rbc4 Rff7 34.Rc8 h6 35.Ra8 a6 36.Rcc8 Kf6 37.Rd8 Rd7 38.Rxd7 Rxd7 39.Rh8 Rh7 40.Rc8 Re7 41.Kf1 Rg7 42.Ke2 Re7 43.Kd2 Ke5 44.Kc3 Be4 45.Bxe4 Kxe4 46.Rh8 Kxd5 47.Rxh6 b5 48.Rg6 Re5 49.Kd3 a5 50.g3 a4 51.f4 gxf4 52.gxf4 Re8 53.Rg5+ Kc6 54.f5 b4 55.f6 b3 56.axb3 axb3 57.Rf5 b2 58.Kc2 Rxe3 59.f7 Re2+ 60.Kb1 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 488 from The Divan News, May 1945.

() Fine – Thomas, H

Blindfold rapid exhibition Washington D.C., 25.04.1945
Spanish Game, Open Variation [C83]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Be7 10.Nbd2 0–0 11.Bc2 Nxd2 12.Qxd2 Na5 13.Qf4 c5 14.Qg3 Re8 15.Ng5 g6 16.Nxe6 fxe6 17.Bxg6 hxg6 18.Qxg6+ Kh8 19.Qh6+ Kg8 20.Qg6+ Kh8 21.Qh6+ Kg8 22.Qxe6+ Kh8 23.Qh6+ Kg8 24.Qg6+ Kh8 25.Bh6 Bf8 26.Bg5 Be7 27.f4 Nc4 28.Rf3 Bxg5 29.fxg5 1–0 Ansel in Quarterly for Chess History 16, 486-7 from The Divan News, May 1945

() Leithiser, H – Fine

Blindfold rapid exhibition Washington DC, Divan CC, 25.04.1945
Sicilian Defence [B45]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Be2 Bb4 7.e5 Nxe5 8.Bd2 0–0 9.0–0 d5 10.f4 Nc6 11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.Bf3 Ba6 13.Re1 Rb8 14.a3 Bc5+ 15.Kh1 Bf2 16.Re5 Nd7 17.Rh5 Rxb2 18.Na4 Rb7 19.f5 g6 20.fxg6 fxg6 21.Rh3 Qf6 22.Bc3 Qf5 23.Qd2 Qxh3 24.gxh3 Rxf3 25.Qh6 d4 26.Bb4 Bc4 27.Nc5 Bd5 28.Kg2 Nxc5 29.Bxc5 Rf5+ 30.Kf1 Be3+ 0–1 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 486 from The Divan News, May 1945.

() Fine – Pinkus, Al

U.S. Lightning championship prelim A New York, 24.06.1945
Nimzowitsch Indian Defence [E33]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 d5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.Qxc3 0–0 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.Bg5 a5 9.e3 h6 10.Bh4 a4 11.Bd3 Na5 12.cxd5 exd5 13.0–0 c6 14.Bc2 b5 15.Ne5 Bd7 16.Bxf6 gxf6 17.Qd3 f5 18.Qe2 Be6 19.f4 Nc4 20.Qh5 Qf6 21.Rf3 Kh7 22.g4 Rg8 23.g5 Nxe5 24.dxe5 Qg6 25.Rh3 Qxh5 26.Rxh5 Rg6 27.Kf2 Rag8 28.Rg1 R8g7 29.Rg3 Kg8 30.gxh6 Rxg3 31.hxg3 Rg6 32.h7+ Kh8 33.Bxf5 Bxf5 34.Rxf5 Rg7 35.Rh5 Rxh7 36.Rxh7+ Kxh7 37.f5 c5 38.Ke2 Kg7 39.g4 Kf8 40.g5 Ke7 41.Kd3 Kf8 42.Kc3 Ke8 43.b3 Kf8 44.bxa4 bxa4 45.Kd3 Ke8 46.Ke2 Ke7 47.Kf3 Kf8 48.Ke2 Ke7 49.Kf3 Kf8 50.Ke2 Ke7 51.Kf3 Kf8 52.Ke2 Ke7 53.Kd3 Kf8 54.Kc3 Ke7 55.Kd2 Kf8 56.f6 Ke8 57.e6 fxe6 58.g6 e5 59.e4 d4 60.Kd3 Kf8 61.Kc4 Ke8 62.Kd5 d3 63.Ke6 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 498-9 from The Divan News July 1945.

() Mugridge, Donald – Fine

U.S. Lightning championship prelim A New York, 24.06.1945
English Opening, Symmetrical [A31]

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.Nc3 Bb4 7.Bg5 h6 8.Bxf6 Qxf6 9.e4 Bxc3+ 10.bxc3 0–0 11.Bd3 d6 12.0–0 Bg4 13.h3 Bxf3 14.Qxf3 Qxf3 15.gxf3 Na5 16.Rab1 Rfc8 17.Rfd1 Kf8 18.Rb5 b6 19.Bf1 Ke7 20.Rbd5 Rc6 21.Kg2 Rac8 22.Kg3 Nxc4 23.Bxc4 Rxc4 24.R1d3 R8c5 25.f4 Rxd5 26.Rxd5 f6 27.f3 Rc8 28.fxe5 fxe5 29.Rd3 Rc4 30.Kg4 g6 31.Kg3 Ra4 32.Rd2 Ke6 33.Kh4 a5 34.Re2 Rc4 35.Re3 b5 0–1 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 498 from The Divan News July 1945.

() Fine – Berliner, Hans

Blindfold rapid simul Washington D.C., 27.06.1945
Catalan Opening [A45]

1.d4 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 Bf5 4.Nf3 e6 5.0–0 Bd6 6.c4 c6 7.Nbd2 Nbd7 8.Nh4 Bg6 9.Qb3 Qc8 10.Re1 0–0 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.e4 dxe4 13.Nxe4 Nxe4 14.Rxe4 e5 15.dxe5 Nc5 16.Qc2 Nxe4 17.Bxe4 Bxe5 18.Be3 Qe6 19.Re1 Rfd8 20.b4 Bd4 21.b5 Rd6 22.bxc6 bxc6 23.h4 Rad8 24.h5 gxh5?? 25.Bxd4 Qg4 26.Bc3 Rd1 27.Kg2 Rxe1 28.Bxe1 h4 29.Bf5 Qd1 30.Qxd1 Rxd1 31.Bb4 hxg3 32.Kxg3 Rd4 33.Bc5 Rxc4 34.Bxa7 Ra4 35.Be3 Rxa2 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 490–91 from The Divan News August 1945.

() Fine – Rousseau, Henry

Blindfold rapid simul Washington D.C., 27.06.1945
Sicilian Defence [B20]

1.e4 c5 2.Ne2 Nf6 3.Nbc3 d5 4.exd5 Nxd5 5.g3 Nxc3 6.Nxc3 Nc6 7.Bg2 Bf5 8.0–0 e6 9.d3 Be7 10.Be3 Rc8 11.Ne4 b6 12.f4 h5 13.Qe2 Bf6 14.c3 g6 15.Rad1 Bg7 16.Ng5 0–0 17.Rd2 Qe7 18.Nf3 e5 19.fxe5 Nxe5 20.Nxe5 Qxe5 21.d4 cxd4 22.cxd4 Qe7 23.Qf2 Rfe8 24.Re1 Qd7 25.d5 Be4 26.d6 Bxg2 27.Qxg2 Re6 28.Qd5 Rce8 29.Rde2 Rxd6 30.Qc4 Rde6 31.b4 Qe7 32.Kf2 Qf6+ 33.Kg2 Qf5 34.Bf2 Rxe2 35.Rxe2 Rxe2 36.Qxe2 Qd5+ 37.Kg1 Bd4 38.b5 Bxf2+ 39.Kxf2 Qh1 40.Ke3 Qd5 41.Kf2 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 491 from The Divan News August 1945.

() Fine – Shapiro, Oscar

Blindfold rapid simul Washington D.C., 27.06.1945
English Opening, Classical Defence [A28]

1.c4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Bb4 6.e3 d5 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Nxc6 bxc6 9.Bd2 Bxc3 10.bxc3 0–0 11.Be2 Qf6 12.Qc1 Qg6 13.0–0 Bh3 14.Bf3 Rad8 15.c4 Nb6 16.Kh1 Bf5 17.c5 Nd5 18.Bc3 Nxc3 19.Qxc3 Be4 20.Bxe4 Qxe4 21.Rad1 Qa4 22.Rxd8 Rxd8 23.Qe5 Qxa2 24.Qxc7 Qd5 25.Qxa7 Re8 26.h3 h6 27.Kg1 Re5 28.Qb8+ Kh7 29.Qb1+ g6 30.Rc1 Rg5 31.e4 Qd4 32.Qc2 Re5 33.Qc4 Qd7 34.Re1 Qe7 35.Qd4 Qxc5 36.Qxc5 Rxc5 37.f4 Kg7 38.Kf2 Kf6 39.Rd1 Ke7 40.Kf3 Rc2 41.Ra1 Ke6 42.Ra8 h5 43.Re8+ Kd7 44.Rh8 Rc3+ 45.Kf2 Rc2+ 46.Kg3 Re2 47.e5 Re3+ 48.Kh4 Re2 49.g3 c5 50.Rf8 Ke7 51.Rc8 Rc2 52.g4 hxg4 53.hxg4 Rc3 54.Kg5 Rc4 55.f5 gxf5 56.gxf5 Rc1 57.Rc7+ Ke8 58.Kf6 c4 59.Rxf7 c3 60.Rc7 c2 61.Ke6 Kd8 62.Rc3 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 490 from The Divan News, August 1945.

() Fine – Korda, S

Blindfold rapid simultaneous Washington D.C., 27.06.1945
Catalan Opening [E01]

1.d4 Nf6 2.g3 e6 3.Bg2 d5 4.c4 Bb4+ 5.Bd2 Bxd2+ 6.Nxd2 0–0 7.Ngf3 Nc6 8.Qc2 Ne7 9.e4 dxe4 10.Nxe4 Nxe4 11.Qxe4 c6 12.h4 f5 13.Qe2 Ng6 14.0–0 Qf6 15.Rae1 Re8 16.h5 Nf8 17.Ne5 c5 18.dxc5 Rb8 19.Rd1 h6 20.f4 Qe7 21.Rd6 b6 22.Nc6 Qc7 23.Nxb8 Qxc5+ 24.Kh1 Qxd6 25.Nc6 Bb7 26.Ne5 Bxg2+ 27.Kxg2 Qc7 28.Rd1 Rd8 29.b4 Rxd1 30.Qxd1 Qb7+ 31.Qf3 Qe7 32.a3 Kh7 33.Qc6 Kg8 34.c5 bxc5 35.bxc5 Kh7 36.Qd6 Qb7+ 37.c6 Qc8 38.c7 Qb7+ 39.Kf2 Qb2+ 40.Kf3 Qb7+ 41.Ke3 Qe4+ 42.Kd2 Qg2+ 43.Kc1 Qg1+ 44.Kb2 Qf2+ 45.Kc3 Qxg3+ 46.Nd3 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 489 from The Divan News, August 1945.

() Fine – Pilnik, Herman

Rapid Washington D.C., 13.09.1945
Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D29]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Bxc4 a6 6.0–0 c5 7.Qe2 b5 8.Bb3 Bb7 9.a4 Nbd7 10.Rd1 Be7 11.Bc2 Qb6 12.e4 cxd4 13.Nxd4 0–0 14.Nc3 Bc5 15.Be3 Rad8 16.axb5 axb5 17.Ndxb5 Bxe3 18.Qxe3 Qxe3 19.fxe3 Nc5 20.Nd6 Bc6 21.b4 Nb7 22.b5 Nxd6 23.bxc6 Nc4 24.Rxd8 Rxd8 25.c7 Rc8 26.Nb5 Ne8 27.Rd1 Kf8 28.Rd8 Nb6 29.Nd6 Ke7 30.Nxc8+ Nxc8 31.Rxc8 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 498 from The Divan News October 1945

() Fine – Pilnik, Herman

Match New York, 08.1949
Queen’s Gambit Declined [D35]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Nbd7 5.Bg5 Be7 6.cxd5 exd5 7.e3 c6 8.Bd3 Nh5 9.h4 h6 10.Bxe7 Qxe7 11.Nd2 Nf4 12.Bf1 Nf6 13.Qc2 g6 14.0–0–0 Bf5 15.Qb3 Ne6 16.f3 h5 17.Na4 0–0–0 18.Be2? (Black has the better position but this oversight costs White a pawn.) 18…Nxd4 19.exd4 Qxe2 20.Qa3 Qd3 (This move is alright but …Qxg2 or …Rhe8 was stronger.) 21.Qxd3 Bxd3 22.Rde1 b6 23.Nf1 Rhe8 24.Ng3 Kd7 25.Kd2 Ba6 26.b3 Rxe1 27.Rxe1 Re8 28.Rc1 Kd6 29.a3 Nd7 30.b4 f5 31.Nc3 Bc4 32.Nge2 Bxe2 33.Nxe2 c5 34.bxc5+ bxc5 35.Nf4 cxd4 36.Kd3 (A mistake that White has to “take back.” 36 Nxg6 would have given White a better chance to draw.) 36…Nc5+ 37.Kc2 (Of course, if Kxd4 Nb3+ forks White’s king and rook.) 37…Re3 38.Rd1 Rc3+ 39.Kb2 Na4+ 40.Ka2 Rc4 (…Rxf3 was probably preferable.) 41.Rd2 Nc3+ 42.Kb2 Nb5 43.Nxg6 Ra4 44.Rd3 Kc5 45.Ne5 Nd6 46.Nd7+ (White misses his last drawing chance with Kb3.) 46…Kc6 47.Nf6 Nc4+ 48.Ka2 Ne5 49.Rd2 d3 (Not only advancing this dangerous pawn but also attacking White’s pawn on h4.) 50.g3 f4 51.Nxh5 fxg3 52.Nxg3 Rxh4 53.Nf5 Rf4 54.Ne7+ Kc5 55.Kb3 Rxf3 56.Ka4 Nc4 (After White’s rook moves along the second rank, …d2 is decisive, leading to a quick mate.) 0–1 From a scoresheet in the possession of Richard Cantwell. Hearst and Knott 2009, 345-6.

() Fine – Pilnik, Herman

Match New York, 08.1949
Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D28]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Bxc4 a6 6.0–0 c5 7.Qe2 Nc6 8.Rd1 b5 9.Bb3 c4 10.Bc2 Nb4 11.e4 Nxc2 12.Qxc2 Bb7 13.d5 exd5 14.Nc3 Be7 15.a4 (In his previous writings Fine himself had recommended 15 e5 here. We cannot be sure why he avoided that move when given the opportunity. EH & JK) 15…b4 16.Nxd5 Nxd5 17.exd5 Bxd5? (Unquestionably a losing move. 17…Qc7 or …Qd6 would leave Black with a fair game. EH&JK) 18.Qf5 Be6 19.Rxd8+ Rxd8 20.Qc2 Bf5 (Both players are grandmasters and if the game were not being played a 10–seconds-a-move and Fine were not blindfolded, Pilnik would have resigned here. EH&JK) 21.Qe2 Bd3 22.Qe1 0–0? 23.Bd2? (Fine did not “see” 23 Qxe7, after which Pilnik would almost be forced to resign. EH&JK) 23…c3 24.Qxe7 cxb2 25.Rd1 Bc2 26.Rf1 a5 27.Qe5 b1Q 28.Rxb1 Bxb1 29.h3 Rfe8 30.Qxa5 b3 31.Bc3 Bg6 32.Bb2 Rb8 33.Nd4 h6 34.h4 h5 35.Qc3 Rec8? (Another blunder. Black is lost anyway but 35…f6 would have held out longer. EH&JK) 36.Nc6 Rxc6 37.Qxg7# 1–0 From a scoresheet in the possession of Richard Cantwell. Hearst and Knott 2009, 345.

() Pilnik, Herman – Fine

Match New York, 08.1949
Dutch Defence [A90]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.c4 Ne4 4.Qc2 f5 5.g3 d5 6.Bg2 c6 7.0–0 Bd6 8.Nc3 0–0 9.Ne5 Bxe5 10.dxe5 Nd7 11.Nxe4 fxe4 12.Qc3 Qc7 13.Bf4 Qd8 14.h4 Qe7 15.Rad1 Nb6 16.b3 Bd7 17.Be3 Rf7 18.Qa5 Qd8 19.c5 d4 20.cxb6 dxe3 21.fxe3 Rxf1+ 22.Bxf1 Kf7 23.Bg2 Ke8 24.Bxe4 Qxb6 25.Qd2 Rd8 26.Bxh7 Bc8 27.Bg6+ Ke7 28.Qxd8+ Qxd8 29.Rxd8 Kxd8 30.Kf2 c5 31.Kf3 b5 32.Kf4 Bb7 33.g4 a5 34.Bd3 Bc6 35.Kg5 Ke7 36.h5 a4 37.h6 gxh6+ 38.Kxh6 axb3 39.axb3 Bd5 40.Bc2 b4 41.g5 c4 42.bxc4 Bxc4 43.g6 b3 44.Bxb3 Bxb3 45.g7 Kf7 46.Kh7 Bc2+ 47.Kh8 1–0 From a scoresheet in the possession of Richard Cantwell. Hearst and Knott 2009, 346.

() Pilnik, Herman – Fine

Match New York, 08.1949
English Opening A34

1.c4 c5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.d4 cxd4 6.Qxd4 Nxc3 7.Qxc3 Nc6 8.e4 e6 9.a3 Be7 10.Bf4 0–0 11.Be2 Qb6 12.Be3 Qc7 13.0–0 Bd7 14.Rac1 Rac8 15.b4 Qb8 16.Qb2 Bf6 17.Qb3 e5 18.Rfd1 Be6 19.Bc4 Bg4 20.Bc5 Bxf3 21.Qxf3 Nd4 22.Qg4 Rfd8 23.Bd5 b6 24.Bxd4 (24… Bd6! would have been a neat move, leading to a winning position for White. But that kind of move is naturally very difficult hard to see and risk when one is playing chess at ten seconds per move.) 24…exd4 25.f4 Rxc1 (25… Rc3 was a good alternative.) 26.Rxc1 Qd6 27.Rc6 Qe7 28.Qf3 (White has a spatial advantage and is trying to win Black’s d-pawn.) 28…g6 29.e5 Bg7 30.Qe4 Qd7 31.Rd6 Qe7 32.Rxd8+ Qxd8 33.Qxd4 Qc7 34.g3 Kf8 35.Qd2 f6 (Black seeks counterplay by giving scope to his bishop, at the cost of allowing White a well-protected passed pawn.) 36.e6 f5 37.b5 Qc5+ 38.Kg2 Ke7 (38… Qxb5 or even 38… Qxa3 should draw easily (39… Qb2 could follow in some variations). But one has the feeling Black is still trying to win.) 39.a4 Bd4 40.Bf3 Kxe6 41.h4 h5 42.Qa2+ Kd6?! (Now Black will lose his pawns on the kingside but he hopes to win White’s pawns on the queenside and use his king to aid the advance of his own queenside pawns.) 43.Qf7 Qc2+ 44.Kh3 Qf2 45.Qxg6+ Kc5 46.Qxf5+ Kb4 47.Qxh5 Kxa4 48.Bg2 Bc5 49.Qe8 Qc2 50.Qe6 Kxb5 51.h5 a5 52.h6 a4 53.Be4 Qb2 54.h7 Bd4 55.Bd3+ Kb4 56.f5 a3 57.Qc4+ Ka5 58.Qa6+ Kb4 59.Qc4+ (59. f6! would lead to a clear win here. After the reply …Bxf6 there would follow 60 Qxb6+ Ka4 61 Qc6+ Kb4 62 Qc4+ Ka5 63 Qc5+ Ka4 64 Bc2+. But who can analyze all this in rapid chess? The whole game becomes a comedy of errors from now on. White has another chance to play this winning variation on his 60th move and overlooks it again.) 59…Ka5 60.Qd5+ b5 61.g4 a2 62.Bxb5?? (Either Qa8+ or Qd8+ would still draw. Now White is lost, but…) 62…a1Q 63.Bd3+ Ka4 (63…Kb6 would win easily.) 64.g5 Qe1? (here …Qf2 would win.) 65.Qc4+ (Instead, Qc6+ would lead to a draw by perpetual check. Now Black can win by playing 65… Qeb4. However, Fine forfeited the game at this point, presumably because he did not move immediately at the end of ten seconds. An amazing back and forth game, with an entirely unexpected finish.) 1–0 From a scoresheet in the possession of Richard Cantwell. Hearst and Knott 2009, 346.

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Newly Published: Longfellow in Love

New on our bookshelf today:

Longfellow in Love: Passion and Tragedy in the Life of the Poet
Edward M. Cifelli

After four years travelling through Europe and a yearlong romance with Giulia Persiani in Rome, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow came back home in 1829 and fell in love again, this time with Mary Storer Potter, whom he married in 1831. They travelled together to England and Scandinavia in 1834 but their happiness was cut short when she died in 1835.

In 1836, traveling in Switzerland, he met the woman who would become the grand passion of his life, 18-year old Fanny Appleton of Boston. But she, a wealthy textile heiress, was not interested in settling down with a Harvard professor. She rebuffed his advances for six years—then suddenly changed her mind and married him on July 13, 1843. For the next 18 years they were “America’s couple,” and Longfellow became America’s poet—and then tragedy struck once again.

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Newly Published: The Magnificent Max Baer

New on our bookshelf today:

The Magnificent Max Baer: The Life of the Heavyweight Champion and Film Star
Colleen Aycock with David W. Wallace

Boxing might not have survived the 1930s if not for Max Baer. A contender for every heavyweight championship 1932–1941, California’s “Glamour Boy” brought back the “million-dollar gate” not seen since the 1920s. His radio voice sold millions of Gillette razor blades; his leading-man appeal made him a heartthrob in The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933). The film was banned in Nazi Germany—Baer had worn a Star of David on his trunks when he TKOed German former champ Max Schmeling.

Baer defeated 275-pound Primo Carnera in 1934 for the championship, losing it to Jim Braddock the next year. Contrary to Cinderella Man, (2005), Baer—favored 10 to 1—was not a villain and the fight was more controversial than the film suggested. His battle with Joe Louis three months later drew the highest gate of the decade.

This first comprehensive biography covers Baer’s complete ring record, his early life, his career on radio, film, stage and television, and his World War II army service.

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Newly Published: The Image of Disability

New on our bookshelf today:

The Image of Disability: Essays on Media Representations
Edited by JL Schatz and Amber E. George

A mainstay of modern life, the global media gives out information about disabilities that is often inaccurate or negative and perpetuates oppressive stigmas and discrimination.

In response to representations that have been incomplete, misguided or unimaginative, this collection of new essays encourages scholars and allies to refashion media so as to disrupt the status quo and move toward more liberatory politics. Images in film, television and social media are assessed through the lenses of disabilities studies, media studies, cultural studies and intersectional studies involving critical race theory and gender.

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Weekly Kindle Spotlight: August 13th

African American Lives in St. Louis, 1763–1865Love e-books? Get these popular titles for 3.99 on Amazon Kindle through August 31st.

African American Lives in St. Louis, 1763-1865: Slavery, Freedom and the West

Ore Knob Mine Murders: The Crime, the Investigation and the Trials

Gold Star Mother Pilgrimages of the 1930s: Overseas Grave Visitations by Mothers and Widows of Fallen U.S. World War I Soldiers

Baseball Rowdies of the 19th Century: Brawlers, Drinkers, Pranksters and Cheats in the Early Days of the Major League

Perverse Titillation: The Exploitation Cinema of Italy, Spain and France, 1960-1980

Town and Gown Relations: A Handbook of Best Practices

The Northwest Ordinance: Constitutional Politics and the Theft of Native Land

Kenneth Strickfaden: Dr. Frankenstein’s Electrician

Vince Guaraldi at the Piano

 

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Newly Published: A Hurdler’s Hurdler

New on our bookshelf today:

A Hurdler’s Hurdler: The Life of Rodney Milburn, Olympic Champion
Steven McGill

In September 1972, Rodney Milburn of Opelousas, Louisiana, won the Olympic gold medal in the men’s 110-meter high hurdles. Raised amid segregation and poverty in the 1950s and 60s, Milburn honed his skills on a grass track over wooden hurdles. In a career that spanned more than a decade, he established himself as the greatest hurdler of his era and one of the greatest athletes in track history.

This biography chronicles Milburn’s rise from poverty to international athletic stardom. Loved ones, as well as track legends Renaldo Nehemiah, Dwight Stones, Tonie Campbell, Brian Oldfield and Bill Collins, relate Milburn’s remarkable achievements and humble nature.

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Newly Published: Humorists vs. Religion

New on our bookshelf today:

Humorists vs. Religion: Critical Voices from Mark Twain to Neil DeGrasse Tyson
Iain Ellis

Critical humorists and religion are steeped in a long-standing cultural antagonism. This book recounts the dramatic skirmishes between religion—its dogma and edicts, political manifestations, and the nature of faith—and the satire, parody, jokes and hyperbole of popular wits. The writings of Twain, Vonnegut, Mencken and Hitchens are included, along with the films of Monty Python, the cartoons of Charlie Hebdo, the animated television series The Simpsons and South Park, the comedy of George Carlin and Bill Maher, the music of Randy Newman and Pussy Riot, the performance monologue of Julia Sweeney and the magic of Penn Jillette.

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Newly Published: A Dune Companion

New on our bookshelf today:

A Dune Companion: Characters, Places and Terms in Frank Herbert’s Original Six Novels
Donald E. Palumbo

This companion to Frank Herbert’s six original Dune novels—DuneDune MessiahChildren of DuneGod Emperor of DuneHeretics of Dune and Chapterhouse: Dune—provides an encyclopedia of characters, locations, terms and other elements, and highlights the series’ underrated aesthetic integrity. An extensive introduction discusses the theme of ecology, chaos theory concepts and structures, and Joseph Campbell’s monomyth in Herbert’s narratives.

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Newly Published: Gary Paulsen

New on our bookshelf today:

Gary Paulsen: A Companion to the Young Adult Literature
Mary Ellen Snodgrass

McFarland Companions to Young Adult Literature American novelist Gary Paulsen is best known for his young adult fiction, including bestsellers NightjohnSoldier’s Heart, and Woods Runner. From his trenchant prose in The Rifle and The Foxman to the witty escapades of Harris and Me and Zero to Sixty, Paulsen crafts stories with impressive range. The tender scenes in The Quilt and A Christmas Sonataspeak to his empathy for children, with characters who endure the same hardships that marred his own early life.

This literary companion introduces readers to his life and work. A-to-Z entries explore themes such as alcoholism, coming of age, slavery, survival, and war. A glossary defines terms unique to his work. Appendices provide related historical references, writing, art, and research topics.

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Newly Published: The Automobile and American Life, 2d ed.

New on our bookshelf today:

The Automobile and American Life, 2d ed.
John Heitmann

Now revised and updated, this book tells the story of how the automobile transformed American life and how automotive design and technology have changed over time. It details cars’ inception as a mechanical curiosity and later a plaything for the wealthy; racing and the promotion of the industry; Henry Ford and the advent of mass production; market competition during the 1920s; the development of roads and accompanying highway culture; the effects of the Great Depression and World War II; the automotive Golden Age of the 1950s; oil crises and the turbulent 1970s; the decline and then resurgence of the Big Three; and how American car culture has been represented in film, music and literature. Updated notes and a select bibliography serve as valuable resources to those interested in automotive history.

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Newly Published: The Metaphysical Mysteries of G.K. Chesterton

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The Metaphysical Mysteries of G.K. Chesterton: A Critical Study of the Father Brown Stories and Other Detective Fiction
Laird R. Blackwell

G.K. Chesterton’s Father Brown stories are widely considered to be some of the finest detective short stories ever published, offering vivid writing, brilliant puzzles, biting social criticism, and metaphysical explorations of life’s great questions. This book presents the first in-depth analysis of his works both as classics of the detective genre and as meaningful philosophical inquiries. The Father Brown stories are examined along with Chesterton’s less well known fiction, including the short stories about Mr. Pond, Gabriel Gale, Basil and Rupert Grant, Horne Fisher, Dr. Adrian Hyde and Philip Swayne, and the novels The Man Who Was Thursday and Manalive.

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Four New Titles Reviewed in August Issue of Choice

Four new titles are reviewed in the August issue of Choice!

The Mistaken History of the Korean War: What We Got Wrong Then and Now
“Few can challenge [Edwards’] passion in defense of the men he represents. Anyone wanting to comprehend the meaning of the Korean War for Americans cannot go wrong with this book. Essential.”

Motor City Champs: Mickey Cochrane and the 1934–1935 Detroit Tigers
“This book serves as an excellent introduction to the business and financial aspects of professional baseball teams in the 1930s…an engaging and informative read…recommended.”

Protecting the Home Front: Women in Civil Defense in the Early Cold War
“Recommended.”

The Californios: A History, 1769–1890
“Recommended.”

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Newly Published: Teaching Huckleberry Finn

New on our bookshelf today:

Teaching Huckleberry Finn: Why and How to Present the Controversial Classic in the High School Classroom
John Nogowski

Nearly all of the Gadsden County’s student body is black and considered economically disadvantaged, the highest percentage of any school district in Florida. Fewer than 15 percent perform at grade level.

An idealistic new teacher at East Gadsden High, John Nogowski saw that the Department of Education’s techniques would not work in this environment. He wanted to make an impact in his students’ lives. In a room stacked with battered classics like A Raisin in the Sun and To Kill a Mockingbird, he found 30 pristine, “quarantined” copies of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Abused by an alcoholic father, neglected by his own community, consigned to a life of privation and danger. Wouldn’t Huck strike a chord with these kids? Were he alive today, wouldn’t he be one of them? Part lesson plan, part memoir, Nogowski’s surprising narrative details his experience teaching Twain’s politically charged satire of American racism and hypocrisy to poor black teens.

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Weekly Kindle Spotlight: August 6th

<I>Empire</I> and Black Images in Popular CultureLove e-books? Save on several popular titles this week with our Kindle Spotlight! Through August 31st, get these books on Kindle for just $3.99.

Empire and Black Images in Popular Culture

A Game of Moments: Baseball Greats Remember Highlights of Their Careers

The Up Stairs Lounge Arson: Thirty-Two Deaths in a New Orleans Gay Bar, June 24 1973

Celtic Myth and Religion: A Study of Traditional Belief, with Newly Translated Poems and Songs

The Annotated Marx Brothers: A Filmgoer’s Guide to In-Jokes, Obscure References and Sly Details

The Art of the English Trade Gun in North America

Icelanders in the Viking Age: The People of the Sagas

The Jewish Story Finder: A Guide to 668 Tales Listing Subjects and Sources

Th Kaiser’s Lost Kreuzer: A History of U-156 and Germany’s Long-range Submarine Campaign Against North America, 1918

Understanding the Pipe Organ: A Guide for Students, Teachers and Lovers of the Instrument

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Newly Published: The Ku Klux Klan’s Campaign Against Hispanics, 1921–1925

New on our bookshelf today:

The Ku Klux Klan’s Campaign Against Hispanics, 1921–1925: Rhetoric, Violence and Response in the American Southwest
Juan O. Sánchez

The Ku Klux Klan’s persecution of Hispanics during the early 1920s was just as brutal as their terrorizing of the black community—a fact sparsely documented in historical texts. The KKK viewed Mexicans as subhuman foreigners supporting a Catholic conspiracy to subvert U.S. institutions and install the pope as leader of the nation, and mounted a campaign of intimidation and violence against them. Drawing on numerous Spanish-language newspapers and Klan publications of the day, the author describes the KKK’s extensive anti–Hispanic activity in the southwest.

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Newly Published: The Lives of Justine Johnstone

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The Lives of Justine Johnstone: Follies Star, Research Scientist, Social Activist
Kathleen Vestuto

As a Ziegfeld Follies girl and film actress, Justine Johnstone (1895–1982) was celebrated as “the most beautiful woman in the world.” Her career took an unexpected turn when she abruptly retired from acting at 31. For the remainder of her life, she dedicated herself to medical research and social activism. As a cutting-edge pathologist, she contributed to the pre-penicillin treatment of syphilis at Columbia University, participated in the development of early cancer treatments at Caltech, and assisted Los Angeles physicians in oncology research. As a divorced woman in the 1940s, she adopted and raised two children on her own. She later helped find work for blacklisted Hollywood screenwriters and became a prominent participant in social and political causes.

The first full-length biography of Johnstone chronicles her extraordinary success in two male-dominated fields—show business and medical science—and follows her remarkable journey into a fascinating and fulfilling life.

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Newly Published: The Spectacle of Twins in American Literature and Popular Culture

New on our bookshelf today:

The Spectacle of Twins in American Literature and Popular Culture
Karen Dillon

The cultural fantasy of twins imagines them as physically and behaviorally identical. Media portrayals consistently offer the spectacle of twins who share an insular closeness and perform a supposed alikeness—standing side by side, speaking and acting in unison.

Treating twinship as a cultural phenomenon, this first comprehensive study of twins in American literature and popular culture examines the historical narrative—within the discourses of experimentation, aberrance and eugenics—and how it has shaped their representations in the 20th and 21st centuries.