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Holiday 2018 Sale—Get 25% Off All Books!

The holidays are a special time at McFarland—in addition to publishing scholarship, many of us also participate in the tree harvest, as Ashe County produces more Christmas trees than any other county in the United States. If you live in the Southeast, you may have a little bit of McFarland in your living room right now! This season, please consider putting some McFarland under the tree for the readers in your life. To make your holiday shopping easier, we’re offering 25% off of ALL books through the end of the year! On our website, use coupon code HOLIDAY18, or call us at 800-253-2187. For inspiration, browse our new catalog of of gift ideas for readers. Happy holidays from your friends at McFarland!

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Newly Published: After Valkyrie

New on our bookshelf today:

After Valkyrie: Military and Civilian Consequences of the Attempt to Assassinate Hitler
Don Allen Gregory

After Operation Valkyrie—the failed July 20, 1944, plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler and seize control of the German government—both the Third Reich and Hitler came to a violent end. Hitler promised a classless fatherland before he became chancellor and had covertly been liquidating Germany’s elite officer corps long before Stalingrad. Today it is possible to reconstruct and connect important events and biographies of the principle characters to chronicle the disappearance of Germany’s officer class, its nobility and, for a time, its civilian leadership.

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Newly Published: A Life Both Public and Private

New on our bookshelf today:

A Life Both Public and Private: Expressions of Individuality in Old English Poetry
Brent R. LaPadula

The concept of the individual or the self, central in so many modern-day contexts, has not been investigated in depth in the Anglo-Saxon period. Focusing on Old English poetry, the author argues that a singular, Anglo-Saxon sense of self may be found by analyzing their surviving verse. The concept of the individual, with an identity outside of her community, is clearly evident during this period, and the widely accepted view that the individual as we understand it did not really exist until the Renaissance does not stand up to scrutiny.

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King Arthur Sales Starts Now

What is known of the legendary King Arthur is mostly derived from folklore and literature.  Though today, one is just as likely to have been introduced to King Arthur by a cartoon boy pulling a sword from a stone.  You’ll find books covering all disciplines in our new King Arthur catalog
For film studies, McFarland’s latest catalog includes such titles as Kevin J. Harty’s groundbreaking Cinema Arthuriana and The Reel Middle Ages.  For students (and professors) of Arthurian literature, William W. Kibler and R. Barton Palmer have brought us a very useful book for the classroom, Medieval Arthurian Epic and Romance.   It offers new translations from Latin, Middle English and Old French of texts that exemplify the most important traditions of Arthurian literature in the Middle Ages.  In addition to Arthuriana in folklore, literature and film, this new catalog also includes our line of popular works debating the evidence about historic sites and figures, including Hengest, Gwrtheyrn and the Chronology of Post-Roman BritainWhen you order direct from our website using the coupon code Arthur25, print editions of all Arthuriana books are 25% off September 15 through September 30.
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Newly Published: Postmodern Artistry in Medievalist Fiction

New on our bookshelf today:

Postmodern Artistry in Medievalist Fiction: An International Study
Earl R. Anderson

Focusing on modern-day fiction set in the Middle Ages or that incorporates medieval elements, this study examines storytelling components and rhetorical tropes in more than 60 works in five languages by more than 40 authors.

Medievalist fiction got its “postmodern” start with such authors as Calvino, Fuentes, Carpentier and Eco. Its momentum increased since the 1990s with writers whose work has received less critical attention, like Laura Esquivel, Tariq Ali, Matthew Pearl, Matilde Asensi, Ildefonso Falcones, Andrew Davison, Bernard Cornwell, Donnal Woolfolk Cross, Ariana Franklin, Nicole Griffith, Levi Grossman, Conn Iggulden, Edward Rutherfurd, Javier Sierra, Alan Moore and Brenda Vantrease.

The author explores a wide range of “medievalizing” tropes, discusses the negative responses of postmodernism and posits four “hard problems” in medievalist fiction.

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Newly Published: Saint James the Greater in History, Art and Culture

New on our bookshelf today:

Saint James the Greater in History, Art and Culture
William Farina

Among the 12 disciples of Jesus, perhaps none has inspired more magnificent art—as well as political upheaval—than Saint James the Greater. Portrayed in the New Testament as part of Jesus’ inner circle, he was the first apostle to be martyred. Eight centuries later, Saint James, or Santiago, become the de facto patron saint of Spain, believed to be a supernatural warrior who led the victorious Christian armies during the Iberian Reconquista. After 1492, the Santiago cult found its way to the New World, where it continued to exert influence.

Today, he remains the patron saint of pilgrims to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela. His legacy has bequeathed a magnificent tradition of Western art over nearly two millennia.

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Newly Published: Magic in Britain

New on our bookshelf today:

Magic in Britain: A History of Medieval and Earlier Practices
Robin Melrose

Magic, both benevolent (white) and malign (black), has been practiced in the British Isles since at least the Iron Age (800 BCE–CE 43). “Curse tablets”—metal plates inscribed with curses intended to harm specific people—date from the Roman Empire. The Anglo-Saxons who settled in England in the fifth and sixth centuries used ritual curses in documents, and wrote spells and charms.

When they became Christians in the seventh century, the new “magicians” were saints, who performed miracles. When William of Normandy became king in 1066, there was a resurgence of belief in magic. The Church was able to quell the fear of magicians, but the Reformation saw its revival, with numerous witchcraft trials in the late 16th and 17th centuries.

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Newly Published: Chivalry in Westeros

New on our bookshelf today:

Chivalry in Westeros: The Knightly Code of A Song of Ice and Fire
Carol Parrish Jamison

George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire has sparked a renewed interest in things medieval. The pseudo-historical world of Westeros delights casual fans while offering a rich new perspective for medievalists and scholars.
This study explores how Martin crafts a chivalric code that intersects with and illuminates well known medieval texts, including both romance and heroic epics.

Through characters such as Brienne of Tarth, Sandor Clegane and Jaime Lannister, Martin variously challenges, upholds and deconstructs chivalry as depicted in the literature of the Middle Ages.

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Newly Published: The New Peplum

New on our bookshelf today:

The New Peplum: Essays on Sword and Sandal Films and Television Programs Since the 1990s
Edited by Nicholas Diak
Foreword by David R. Coon; Afterword by Steven L. Sears

Peplum or “sword-and-sandal” films—an Italian genre of the late 1950s through the 1960s—featured ancient Greek, Roman and Biblical stories with gladiators, mythological monsters and legendary quests. The new wave of historic epics, known as neo-pepla, is distinctly different, embracing new technologies and storytelling techniques to create an immersive experience unattainable in the earlier films.

This collection of new essays explores the neo-peplum phenomenon through a range of topics, including comic book adaptations like Hercules, the expansion of genre boundaries in Jupiter Ascending and John Carter, depictions of Romans and slaves in Spartacus, and The Eagle and Centurion as metaphors for America’s involvement in the Iraq War.

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New Catalog and Huge Holiday Sale

It’s our biggest sale of the year! Through the holiday season, get 30% off your order of two or more books with the coupon code HOLIDAY17! Need inspiration? Check out our brand new holiday catalog!

HOLIDAY17 is valid through January 2, 2018, and applies to any book on McFarland’s website. Browse our entire online catalog here

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Weekly Deal: The Inklings

This week, get 20% off all books about the Inklings when you use the coupon code OXFORD!

Tolkien’s Intellectual Landscape

Chivalric Stories as Children’s Literature: Edwardian Retellings in Words and Pictures

The Fantastic Made Visible: Essays on the Adaptation of Science Fiction and Fantasy from Page to Screen

J.R.R. Tolkien, Robert E. Howard and the Birth of Modern Fantasy

Politics in Fantasy Media: Essays on Ideology and Gender in Fiction, Film, Television and Games

Nature and the Numinous in Mythopoeic Fantasy Literature

The Hobbit and Tolkien’s Mythology: Essays on Revisions and Influences

Tolkien and the Modernists: Literary Responses to the Dark New Days of the 20th Century

A Quest of Her Own: Essays on the Female Hero in Modern Fantasy

The Body in Tolkien’s Legendarium: Essays on Middle-earth Corporeality

Tolkien in the New Century: Essays in Honor of Tom Shippey

The Formulas of Popular Fiction: Elements of Fantasy, Science Fiction, Romance, Religious and Mystery Novels

Tolkien and the Study of His Sources: Critical Essays

Ancient Symbology in Fantasy Literature: A Psychological Study

The Evolution of Fantasy Role-Playing Games

Middle-earth Minstrel: Essays on Music in Tolkien

Picturing Tolkien: Essays on Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings Film Trilogy

Lilith in a New Light: Essays on the George MacDonald Fantasy Novel

The Evolution of Tolkien’s Mythology: A Study of the History of Middle-earth

Fantasy Fiction into Film: Essays

Milton, Spenser and The Chronicles of Narnia: Literary Sources for the C.S. Lewis Novels

Tolkien and Shakespeare: Essays on Shared Themes and Language

The Scientifiction Novels of C.S. Lewis: Space and Time in the Ransom Stories

The Medieval Hero on Screen: Representations from Beowulf to Buffy

The Detective Fiction Reviews of Charles Williams, 1930–1935

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Newly Published: Goddess and Grail

New on our bookshelf today:

Goddess and Grail: The Battle for King Arthur’s Promised Land
Jeffrey John Dixon 

The early chroniclers of Britain presented the island as the promised land of the Roman goddess Diana. Later, when the story of Arthur was transformed by Christian mythology, a new literary concept of the island was promoted: the promised land of the Holy Grail. As the feminine enchantment of the Goddess gave way to the masculine crusade of the Grail Quest, the otherworld realms of the fays or fairy women were denigrated in favor of the heavenly afterlife.

The dualism of the medieval authors was challenged by modern writers such as Blake and Tolkien, as well as by the scholars of the Eranos conferences. This book explores the conflict between Goddess and Grail—a rift less about paganism versus Christianity than about religious literalism versus spiritual imagination—which is resolved in the figure of Sophia (Divine Wisdom).

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Newly Published: Game of Thrones and the Medieval Art of War

New on our bookshelf today:

Game of Thrones and the Medieval Art of War
Ken Mondschein

George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire novels and HBO’s Game of Thrones series depict a medieval world at war. But how accurate are they? The author, an historian and medieval martial arts expert, examines in detail how authentically Martin’s fictional world reflects the arms and armor, fighting techniques and siege warfare of the Middle Ages. Along the way, he explores the concept of “medievalism”—modern pop culture’s idea of the Middle Ages.

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Newly Published: King Arthur and Robin Hood on the Radio

New on our bookshelf today:

King Arthur and Robin Hood on the Radio: Adaptations for American Listeners
Katherine Barnes Echols 

Before stories of King Arthur and Robin Hood were adapted and readapted for film, television and theater, radio scriptwriters looking for material turned to Thomas Malory’s Le Morte Darthur (1485) and Howard Pyle’s The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood (1883). From the 1930s throughout the mid–1950s, their legends inspired storylines for Abbott and Costello, Popeye, Let’s Pretend, Escape, Gunsmoke, The Adventures of Superman and others. Many of these adaptations reflect the moral and ethical questions of the day, as characters’ faced issues of gender relations, divorce, citizenship, fascism, crime and communism in a medieval setting.

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Newly Published: Celtic Astrology from the Druids to the Middle Ages

New on our bookshelf today:

Celtic Astrology from the Druids to the Middle Ages
M.G. Boutet 
Foreword by David Frawley

Our understanding of Celtic astrology is based mainly on the speculations of modern authors—mostly drawn from classical Greek and Roman writings—and suffers from many misconceptions. European astrology uses the Greek model, containing many Babylonian and Egyptian elements. But Celtic astrology (and other Indo-European astrologies) developed earlier, with relationships to Middle Eastern systems, as well as their own independent forms.

This well documented study takes a fresh look at the development of Celtic astrology and the Druids’ systems of cosmology, astronomy and astrology. The author analyzes commentaries found in manuscript sources from antiquity to the Middle Ages, comparing them with cosmological and astronomical lore found in Celtic cultures. Ancient constellations, calendars, deities and rituals reveal a rich worldview.

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Weekly Deal: Arthur, King of the Britons

This week, through May 14, 2017, get 20% off all books about King Arthur when you use the coupon code ARTHURIANA!

Warriors and Wilderness in Medieval Britain: From Arthur and Beowulf to Sir Gawain and Robin Hood

Religion in Britain from the Megaliths to Arthur: An Archaeological and Mythological Exploration

The Chivalric Romance and the Essence of Fiction

Chivalric Stories as Children’s Literature: Edwardian Retellings in Words and Pictures

The British Heroic Age: A History, 367–664

The Glory of Arthur: The Legendary King in Epic Poems of Layamon, Spenser and Blake

Perceval and Gawain in Dark Mirrors: Reflection and Reflexivity in Chrétien de Troyes’s Conte del Graal

Hengest, Gwrtheyrn and the Chronology of Post-Roman Britain

King Arthur’s European Realm: New Evidence from Monmouth’s Primary Sources

The Holy Grail on Film: Essays on the Cinematic Quest

Evidence of Arthur: Fixing the Legendary King in Factual Place and Time

Arthurian Animation: A Study of Cartoon Camelots on Film and Television

Origins of Arthurian Romances: Early Sources for the Legends of Tristan, the Grail and the Abduction of the Queen

Glastonbury and the Grail: Did Joseph of Arimathea Bring the Sacred Relic to Britain?

The Druids and King Arthur: A New View of Early Britain

Chrétien de Troyes and the Dawn of Arthurian Romance

Medieval Arthurian Epic and Romance: Eight New Translations

Cinema Arthuriana: Twenty Essays, rev. ed.

Historic Figures of the Arthurian Era: Authenticating the Enemies and Allies of Britain’s Post-Roman King

Arthurian Figures of History and Legend: A Biographical Dictionary

Arthurian Legends on Film and Television

Movie Medievalism: The Imaginary Middle Ages

The Historic King Arthur: Authenticating the Celtic Hero of Post-Roman Britain

Sir Gawain and the Classical Tradition: Essays on the Ancient Antecedents

The Grail Procession: The Legend, the Artifacts, and the Possible Sources of the Story

King Arthur in Popular Culture

The King Arthur Myth in Modern American Literature

The Holy Grail: The Legend, the History, the Evidence

 

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Women's Studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Playing for Equality: Oral Histories of Women Leaders in the Early Years of Title IX
Diane LeBlanc and Allys Swanson

Mammography and Early Breast Cancer Detection: How Screening Saves Lives
Alan B. Hollingsworth, M.D.

The Beyoncé Effect: Essays on Sexuality, Race and Feminism
Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek

Click here to browse McFarland’s complete line of women’s studies titles. 

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Newly Published: The British Heroic Age

New on our bookshelf today:

The British Heroic Age: A History, 367–664
Flint F. Johnson

Drawing on historical documents, legends, archeology and literature, this history describes the disintegration of Roman Britain that reached a climax in the decades after the Britons overthrew Constantine’s government and were refused Roman rule. Beginning with the weakening of Roman Britain, the author chronicles the breakdown of the empire’s social, political and economic order and the re-emergence of British political, economic and social structure as well as a parallel development among the Germanic invaders. The roles of religion, disease, the military, the Irish and the Picts during the 4th through 7th centuries are examined. This study synthesizes advances in post–Roman studies since Leslie Alcock’s 1971 classic Arthur’s Britain.

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Weekly Deal: Poetry

This week, through August 7, 2016, get 20% off all books of poetry when you enter the coupon code POET!

On Human Flourishing: A Poetry Anthology

Reflections on the New River: New Essays, Poems and Personal Stories

Piers Plowman: A Modern Verse Translation

The Experimental Poetry of José Juan Tablada: A Collection in Spanish and English

Miklós RadnótiL: The Complete Poetry in Hungarian and English

Center Field Grasses: Poems from Baseball

The New American Poetry of Engagement: A 21st Century Anthology

Elías Nandino: Selected Poems, in Spanish and English

Medieval Arthurian Epic and Romance: Eight New Translations

Southern Appalachian Poetry: An Anthology of Works by 37 Poets

Base-Ball Ballads

Versos Sencillos: A Dual-Language Edition

The Trial of Womankind: A Rhyming Translation of Book IV of the Fifteenth-Century Le Champion des Dames

Each of Us Is a Book: Poems for the Library Minded

Catcher in the Wry: Baseball Poems

Cardinal Points: Poems on St. Louis Cardinals Baseball

Waiting for Godot’s First Pitch: More Poems from Baseball

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Newly Published: Narrative Subversion in Medieval Literature

New on our bookshelf today:

Narrative Subversion in Medieval Literature
E.L. Risden

A story that follows a simple trajectory is seldom worth telling. But the unexpected overturning of narrative progress creates complexity and interest, directing the reader’s attention to the most powerful elements of a story.

Exile, for example, upsets a protagonist’s hopes for a happy earthly life, emphasizing spiritual perception instead. Waking life interrupts dreams, just as dreams may redirect how one lives.

Focusing on medieval literature, this study explores how narrative subversion works in such well known stories as Beowulf,Piers Plowman, Le Morte D’Arthur, The Canterbury Tales, Troylus and Criseyde, “Völuspá” and other Old Norse sagas, Grail quest romances, and many others.

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Newly Published: The Faerie Queene as Children’s Literature

New on our bookshelf today:

The Faerie Queene as Children’s Literature: Victorian and Edwardian Retellings in Words and Pictures
Velma Bourgeois Richmond

Edmund Spenser’s vast epic poem The Faerie Queene is the most challenging masterpiece in early modern literature and is praised as the work most representative of the Elizabethan age. In it he fused traditions of medieval romance and classical epic, his religious and political allegory creating a Protestant alternative to the Catholic romances rejected by humanists and Puritans. The poem was later made over as children’s literature, retold in lavish volumes and schoolbooks and appreciated in pedagogical studies and literary histories.

Distinguished writers for children simplified the stories and noted artists illustrated them. Children were less encouraged to consider the allegory than to be inspired to the moral virtues. This book studies The Faerie Queene’s many adaptations for a young audience in order to provide a richer understanding of both the original and adapted texts.

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Newly Published: Vikings and Goths

New on our bookshelf today:

Vikings and Goths: A History of Ancient and Medieval Sweden
Gary Dean Peterson

The Vikings descended upon Europe at the close of the 8th century, invading the continent’s western seas and river systems, trading, raiding and spreading terror. In the north, they settled Iceland and Greenland and reached North America. In the east, Swedish Varangians established a river road to the Orient. With the collapse of the Viking commercial empire, Sweden and the other Scandinavian countries struggled to survive, their hardships exacerbated by internal strife, foreign domination and the Black Death.

This book details the development of Scandinavia—Sweden in particular—from the end of the Ice Age, through a series of prehistoric cultures, the Bronze and Iron ages, to the Viking period and late Middle Ages. Recent research suggests a Swedish origin of the Goths, who helped dismember the Roman Empire, and evidence of Swedish participation in the western Viking expeditions. Special attention is given to Eastern Europe, where Sweden dominated commerce through the conquest of trade towns and the river systems of Russia.

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Newly Published: Encyclopedia of Giants and Humanoids in Myth, Legend and Folklore

New on our bookshelf today:

Encyclopedia of Giants and Humanoids in Myth, Legend and Folklore
Theresa Bane

Every culture has in its folklore and mythology beings of immense size and strength, as well as other preternatural humanoids great or small who walk among us, serving the divine or fulfilling their own agendas. This book catalogs the lore and legends of more than 1,000 different humanoid species and individual beings, including the Titans, Valkyries, Jotnar, yōkai, biblical giants, elves, ogres, trolls and many more.

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International Congress on Medieval Studies 2016

We’re in Kalamazoo for the 2016 International Congress on Medieval Studies! Visit our senior acquisitions editor, Gary Mitchem, in the exhibit hall to browse books and discuss your nonfiction manuscript!

Hosted by Western Michigan University’s Medieval Institute, the International Congress on Medieval Studies is an annual gathering of around 3,000 scholars interested in medieval studies. The congress features  550-575 sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables, workshops and performances. There are also some 100 business meetings and receptions sponsored by learned societies, associations and institutions. The exhibits hall boasts nearly 70 exhibitors, including publishers, used book dealers and purveyors of medieval sundries. The congress lasts three and a half days, extending from Thursday morning, with sessions beginning at 10 a.m., until Sunday at noon.

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Newly Published: Encyclopedia of Beasts and Monsters in Myth, Legend and Folklore

New on our bookshelf today:

Encyclopedia of Beasts and Monsters in Myth, Legend and Folklore
Theresa Bane

“Here there be dragons”—this notation was often made on ancient maps to indicate the edges of the known world and what lay beyond. Heroes who ventured there were only as great as the beasts they encountered. This encyclopedia contains more than 2,200 monsters of myth and folklore, who both made life difficult for humans and fought by their side. Entries describe the appearance, behavior, and cultural origin of mythic creatures well-known and obscure, collected from traditions around the world.

 

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Now in Softcover: Understanding the Castle Ruins of England and Wales

Now available in softcover:

Understanding the Castle Ruins of England and Wales: How to Interpret the History and Meaning of Masonry and Earthworks
Lise Hull

Medieval castles were not just showcases for the royal and powerful, they were also the centerpieces of many people’s daily lives. A travel guide as well as a historical text, this volume looks at castles not just as ruined buildings, but as part of the cultural and scenic landscape. The 88 photographs illustrate the different architectural concepts and castle features discussed in the text. The book includes glossaries of terminology, an appendix listing all the castles mentioned and their locations, notes, bibliography and index.

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Newly Published: Religion in Britain from the Megaliths to Arthur

New on our bookshelf today:

Religion in Britain from the Megaliths to Arthur: An Archaeological and Mythological Exploration
Robin Melrose

The Druids and the Arthurian legends are all most of us know about early Britain, from the Neolithic to the Iron Age (4500 BC–AD 43). Drawing on archaeological discoveries and medieval Welsh texts like the Mabinogion, this book explores the religious beliefs of the ancient Britons before the coming of Christianity, beginning with the megaliths—structures like Stonehenge—and the role they played in prehistoric astronomy.

Topics include the mysterious Beaker people of the Early Bronze Age, Iron Age evidence of the Druids, the Roman period and the Dark Ages. The author discusses the myths of King Arthur and what they tell us about paganism, as well as what early churches and monasteries reveal about the enigmatic Druids.

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Newly Published: Faroe-Islander Saga

New on our bookshelf today:

Faroe-Islander Saga: A New English Translation
Robert K. Painter

This new English translation of the Faroe-Islander Saga (Faereyinga saga)—a great medieval Icelandic saga—tells the story of the first settlers on these wind-swept islands at the edge of the Scandinavian world. Written by an anonymous 13th-century Icelander, the saga centers on the enduring animosity between Sigmundur Brestirsson and Thrandur of Göta, rival chieftains whose bitter disagreements on the introduction of Christianity to the Faroe Islands set the stage for much violence and a feud which then unfolds over generations of their descendants.

Making the saga accessible to a wider English readership, the translation is accompanied by a brief introduction, explanatory notes, genealogical and chronological tables, detailed maps and an excerpt from Jomsvikings’ Saga which informs missing passages from the Faroe-Islander Saga manuscripts.

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New Holiday Catalog—And Our Biggest Sale of the Year!

Holiday 2015Our brand-new holiday catalog is in the mail, but we’re giving you a sneak preview this morning—click here for great holiday gift ideas before the catalog hits your mailbox!

And, because it’s never too early to start your holiday shopping, we’re offering our biggest sale of the year! Get 30% off your purchase of two or more books when you enter the coupon code HOLIDAY2015 at checkout!

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North Carolina Library Association 2015 Conference

We’re exhibiting at the biennial North Carolina Library Association conference in Greensboro, North Carolina this week! Our own Dylan Lightfoot and Stephanie Nichols are exhibiting books, and several McFarland authors are among the NC librarians attending the convention.

NCLA Cole
Author J. Timothy Cole with his books, The Forest City Lynching of 1900 and Collett Leventhorpe, the English Confederate.
NCLA Shiflett
Author Orvin Lee Shiflett with his book, William Terry Couch and the Politics of Academic Publishing

 

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Medievalism in Popular Culture

medieval185This just in from our friends at the International Arthurian Society, North American Branch…the Medievalism in Popular Culture Area’s deadline submission  is October 1, 2015 (one month earlier than previous years).

PCA/ACA 2016 National Conference (March 21- 25, 2016, Seattle, Washington): The Medievalism in Popular Culture Area (now the combined areas of Arthurian and Other Medievalism) accepts papers on all topics that explore either popular culture during the Middle Ages or transcribe some aspect of the Middle Ages into the popular culture of later periods.  These representations can occur in any genre, including film, television, novels, graphic novels, gaming, advertising, art, etc.   Submissions encouraged about the following topics:

·          The Arthurian World
·          Children’s Books / Shows / Games
·          Medievalism and Science Fiction
·          Medievalism in Game of Thrones, including representations of masculinity, weapons, and vows
·          Robin Hood
·          Medievalism and Teaching
·          Board Games / Online Gaming / Cosplay
·          Medievalism in Novels /Short Stories/ Poem

All papers will be included in sessions with four presenters each, so plan to present on your topic for no more than 15 minutes, inclusive of any audio or visual materials. If your topic idea does not fit into any of these categories, please feel free to submit your proposal.  I would like to encourage as much participation as possible, and depending on submissions, I may rearrange the topic groupings. Panel submissions are also welcome on any topic of medievalism. If you would like to propose a panel, please submit your complete panel directly to Christina Francis (individual papers must be submitted to the PCA online system — see below).

Submission requirements:
Please submit a title and a 250 word abstract to http://ncp.pcaaca.org.  All submissions must be directed to the online database.  Be sure to indicate whatever audio/visual needs you may have.  Traditionally, all rooms at the PCA/ACA conference provide a projection screen with sound capability.  Presenters are required to bring their own laptops and any special connectors.  Deadline for submission: October 1, 2015 (one month earlier than previous years). For questions, contact Christina Francis. 

Christina Francis
Associate Professor
Medieval Literature & Gender Studies
Department of English
Bloomsburg University
Email: [email protected]

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Ashe County: Where McFarland Resides

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Authors, customers, friends, and fans: if you’ve ever wondered what McF’s mountain town is like, have a look at this neat response about our area from a recent vacationer.  (A special nod, too, to our Boondocks friends who regularly support us in a number of ways.)  We love where we live!

 

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CONFERENCE: American Library Association 2015 Annual Meeting

cHICAGO)

There is much to celebrate today!  Our publishing duty, however, is to equip you with industry intel (some of which is less likely to be in your news feed today).  Therefore, as we witness historic decisions in our country, we’d be remiss not to mention the Annual American Library Association conference, which meets over the weekend in San Francisco.  Themed “TRANSFORMING our libraries, ourselves, McFarland looks forward to several days’ worth of terrific conversations about all things librarianship.

A happy coincidenceassistant sales manager Adam Phillips has THIS hotel view, providing opportunities to share the goings-on of an historic Pride Week in San Francisco.    

 

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May Day Festivals in America, 1830 to the Present

978-0-7864-7722-7How time flies!  It seems like only yesterday we were wassailing our apple trees.  Now, spring is upon us, and it is time to dance and crown a May Queen.

Not just an old European tradition, Allison Thompson’s book describes how, starting in the early 1830s, American girls and women began to hold Old English May Day festivals, complete with maypole dances, the crowning of a May Queen, and romantic plays and pageants. These festivals accelerated in popularity after 1900 at colleges and universities across the country. An important part of the traditional college experience for many women, the celebrations played a surprisingly influential role in the Progressive reform movement.

May Day Festivals in America, 1830 to the Present is a thorough history that examines the creation and development of the traditional American May Day festival. It also provides an overview of May Day celebrations at 80 specific college and universities, eight of which continue to celebrate the festival annually.   The Society of Folk and Dance Historians calls the book “a model of organization and scholarship, with each well-researched chapter building on the previous to paint a clear and logical portrait of May Day celebrations…fascinating insights…well-researched and well-written, packed with information and illustrations…you must read this book.”

For more about May Day Festivals in America, 1830 to the Present, or to purchase this book, go to the book’s page in McFarland’s online catalog.

For more about the Celtic roots of the day, take a look at Sharon Paice MacLeod’s Celtic Myth and Religion: A Study of Traditional Belief, with Newly Translated Prayers, Poems and Songs and The Divine Feminine in Ancient Europe: Goddesses, Sacred Women and the Origins of Western Culture.

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Releases for March 4: Macon College, Tolkien, City Grid Street, Fringe History

978-0-7864-7946-7

Randolph Macon College in the Early Years: Making Preachers, Teachers and Confederate Officers, 1830–1868 by John Caknipe, Jr.

Tolkien’s Intellectual Landscape by E.L. Risden

Remaking the City Street Grid: A Model for Urban and Suburban Development by Fanis Grammenos

Foundations of Atlantis, Ancient Astronauts and Other Alternative Pasts: 148 Documents Cited by Writers of Fringe History, Translated with Annotations by Jason Colavito

 

 

 

 

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WEEKLY DEAL: Tolkien Studies

978-0-7864-6482-1McFarland & Company, at your service!  (Thank you, Bilbo, for teaching us proper etiquette.)  While we’d like to offer you all ale, seed-cake, mince pies, buttered scones, apple tarts and cheese, we do have some fine scholarship about Tolkien to share (links listed below).  And in lieu of burgling a dragon’s hoard for you, we’re extending a 20% discount with the coupon code HOARD.  This “weekly” deal is good through New Year’s.  (New deal coming January 2, 2015.)

Tolkien and the Study of His Sources: Critical Essays

J.R.R. Tolkien, Robert E. Howard and the Birth of Modern Fantasy

The Evolution of Tolkien’s Mythology: A Study of the History of Middle-earth

The Hobbit and Tolkien’s Mythology: Essays on Revisions and Influences

Tolkien and the Modernists: Literary Responses to the Dark New Days of the 20th Century

Picturing Tolkien: Essays on Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings Film Trilogy

The Body in Tolkien’s Legendarium: Essays on Middle-earth Corporeality

Tolkien and Shakespeare: Essays on Shared Themes and Language

Tolkien in the New Century: Essays in Honor of Tom Shippey

Middle-earth Minstrel: Essays on Music in Tolkien

Tolkien’s Intellectual Landscape

BROWSE ALL BOOKS ABOUT INKLINGS

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Le Guin and Gaiman at National Book Awards

Photo by Eileen Gunn
Photo by Eileen Gunn

At the 2014 National Book Awards, Ursula Le Guin accepted the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.  Author Neil Gaiman presented the awards.  Le Guin said, “I rejoice in accepting [this prize] for, and sharing it with, all the writers who were excluded from literature for so long: my fellow authors of fantasy and science fiction.”  NPR covered the award here:  http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/11/20/365434149/book-news-ursula-k-le-guin-steals-the-show-at-the-national-book-awards

Le Guin-related books from McFarland:

One Earth, One People:
The Mythopoeic Fantasy Series of Ursula K. Le Guin, Lloyd Alexander, Madeleine L’Engle and Orson Scott Card

Ursula K. Le Guin’s Journey to Post-Feminism

Nature and the Numinous in Mythopoeic Fantasy Literature

The Past That Might Have Been, the Future That May Come:
Women Writing Fantastic Fiction, 1960s to the Present

Practicing Science Fiction:
Critical Essays on Writing, Reading and Teaching the Genre

Literary Eats:
Emily Dickinson’s Gingerbread, Ernest Hemingway’s Picadillo, Eudora Welty’s Onion Pie and 400+ Other Recipes from American Authors Past and Present

Gaiman-related books from McFarland:

Feminism in the Worlds of Neil Gaiman:
Essays on the Comics, Poetry and Prose

Neil Gaiman in the 21st Century:
Essays on the Novels, Children’s Stories, Online Writings, Comics and Other Works

The Gothic Fairy Tale in Young Adult Literature:
Essays on Stories from Grimm to Gaiman

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Weekly Deal: Numismatics

This week, save a little money on a good book about… well, money. Through November 23, 2014, get 20% off the following books when you enter the coupon code CASH!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panic Scrip of 1893, 1907 and 1914: An Illustrated Catalog of Emergency Monetary Issues

The Monetary Imagination of Edgar Allan Poe: Banking, Currency and Politics in the Writings

Astronomical Symbols on Ancient and Medieval Coins

Florida Paper Money: An Illustrated History, 1817–1934

The Greenback: Paper Money and American Culture

Alaska and Yukon Tokens: Private Coins of the Territories, 3d ed.

World Monetary Units: An Historical Dictionary, Country by Country

Coins and Currency: An Historical Encyclopedia

The Coins and Banknotes of Palestine Under the British Mandate, 1927–1947

Show Me the Money!: The Standard Catalog of Motion Picture, Television, Stage and Advertising Prop Money

Benjamin Franklin, Genius of Kites, Flights and Voting Rights

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CALL FOR REVIEWERS: Tales of Superhuman Powers

talesofsuperhumanpowersAre you a book review editor, reviewer, or folklorist interested in receiving a media copy of Tales of Superhuman Powers: 55 Traditional Stories from Around the World?  McFarland has a supply of review copies available upon request.  Contact us via our review copy request form, filling out the form completely, to receive your copy.

Csenge Virág Zalka, a Hungarian storyteller, has collected 55 foltktales from around the world about supernatural abilities like superhuman strength, invulnerability, flying, heightened senses, speed, invisibility, healing, agility, precognition, telepathy, fire manipulation, teleportation, water powers, and shifting.  These tales represent powers that people have dreamed of, conjured up and strived for through the ages.   Many of the powers are present in popular culture, making the superheroes who wield them the direct descendants of characters such as the princess who could see through walls or the invulnerable Isfandiyar.  Zalka excluded stories about magic or about gods with divine powers, and focused on less well-known stories.  She included information on similar heroes, the ability in the story, sources of the powers, the origin of the story, teachings in it, the recommended age group, sources, variants, and comments.

#folklore #superheoes #comics #popculture

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Weekly Deal: Scotland

Vote Yes for some good books about Scotland! Through September 28, 2014, use the coupon code SCOT and get 20% off the list price of the following books:

 

 

 

 

 

Scotland as We Know It: Representations of National Identity in Literature, Film and Popular Culture

British and Irish Poets: A Biographical Dictionary, 449–2006

When Scotland Was Jewish: DNA Evidence, Archeology, Analysis of Migrations, and Public and Family Records Show Twelfth Century Semitic Roots

Monarchs of the Renaissance: The Lives and Reigns of 42 European Kings and Queens

Culture Wars in British Literature: Multiculturalism and National Identity

British Fortifications Through the Reign of Richard III: An Illustrated History

Deborah Kerr: A Biography

Sherlock Holmes and Conan Doyle Locations: A Visitor’s Guide

Correspondence Chess in Britain and Ireland, 1824–1987

Caledonian Jews: A Study of Seven Small Communities in Scotland

Gothic Kings of Britain: The Lives of 31 Medieval Rulers, 1016–1399

The Scotch-Irish: From the North of Ireland to the Making of America

Lockerbie and Libya: A Study in International Relations

The Thistle and the Brier: Historical Links and Cultural Parallels Between Scotland and Appalachia

British Author House Museums and Other Memorials: A Guide to Sites in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales

The Other British Isles: A History of Shetland, Orkney, the Hebrides, Isle of Man, Anglesey, Scilly, Isle of Wight and the Channel Islands

The Infamous Burke and Hare: Serial Killers and Resurrectionists of Nineteenth Century Edinburgh

The Transgressive Iain Banks: Essays on a Writer Beyond Borders

Robin Hood: A Cinematic History of the English Outlaw and His Scottish Counterparts

John Buchan: A Companion to the Mystery Fiction

 

 

 

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THROWBACK THURSDAY: King Arthur for the Classroom

It was fall semester 1991 that I acquired two prized possessions:  Pearl Jam’s Ten and the “gray King Arthur book.”  Ever since the one-of-a-kind Dr. Dennis J. McKevlin, Jr., taught his Arthurian Legends class at Western Carolina University, I’ve treasured the gray book.  We used Arthur, King of Britain: History, Chronicle, Romance & Criticism, with Texts in Modern English, from Gildas to Malory (edited by Richard L. Brengle, Prentice-Hall, 1964) as our sole textbook, though generously supplemented by notes and handouts from McKevlin.  For the majority of us, it was our first time encountering persons and works such as Bede, Nennius, Gildas, Wace, Layamon, The Mabignogion, and the Historia Regum Britanniae.  Now, William W. Kibler and R. Barton Palmer have brought us a very useful book for the classroom, Medieval Arthurian Epic and Romance: Eight New Translations.   The just published book offers new translations from Latin, Middle English and Old French of texts that exemplify the most important traditions of Arthurian literature in the Middle Ages.  On my bookshelf, this one is going to line up right beside the gray book!  — Karl-Heinz Roseman, Vice President, Sales and Marketing

For more about Medieval Arthurian Epic and Romance,  go to the book’s page in McFarland’s online catalog.  For teaching academics who would like to examine a copy for possible use in their classroom, use our exam copy request form.

#tbt #kingarthur #books #wcu

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New Releases for August 5: Merchant Sail, Baseball, Cockatoos, Medieval Arthurian, Composition

The Masting of American Merchant Sail in the 1850s: An Illustrated Study by William L. Crothers

Baseball Explained by Phillip Mahony

The Cockatoos: A Complete Guide to the 21 Species by Edward John Mulawka

Medieval Arthurian Epic and Romance: Eight New Translations by William W. Kibler

Practical Composition: Exercises for the English Classroom from Working Instructors by Russell Brickey

 

 

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New Releases for July 29: United States Military, Arthur, Hamlet, Monstrous Bodies, Boarding School

978-0-7864-9448-4

The United States Military in Latin America: A History of Interventions through 1934 by George B. Clark

The Glory of Arthur: The Legendary King in Epic Poems of Layamon, Spenser and Blake by Jeffrey John Dixon

The First Two Quartos of <I>Hamlet: A New View of the Origins and the Relationship of the Texts by Margrethe Jolly

Monstrous Bodies: Feminine Power in Young Adult Horror Fiction by June Pulliam

American Boarding School Fiction, 1928–1981: A Critical Study by Alexander H. Pitofsky

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFERENCE: American Library Association Annual

ALA Annual 2014June 27-30, the American Library Association is gathering in Las Vegas for Annual.  We’re still trying to get our book display set up in the exhibit hall, with some “help” from early browsers like Allan Greenburg of Diamond Comic Distributors (pictured). McFarland is in Booth #1423, and our friends at Diamond are in Booth #2015.

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McFarland Celebrates 35 Years

mainofficeOn April 1st, 1979, founder Robert McFarland Franklin departed Plainfield, New Jersey, heading south in a Volkswagen bug towing a U-Haul.  With wife Cheryl behind the wheel, Robert began company operations on a yellow pad in his lap.

Thirty-five years ago, libraries provided almost the sole market (but a robust one!) for the heavily-researched books that McFarland made its specialty.  Over the decades, the company won ever-growing numbers of devoted readers who appreciated the care McFarland and its authors lavished on our books.  Our authors, a throng of thousands now, teach us something new every day.

We’re having an open house Friday, June 20, from noon until 5:00.  Join us for tours, conversation, punch, finger food, art and books.


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New Releases for May 5: Peggy lee, Dreyfus, Marines, Chopin, Special Effects

978-0-7864-9568-9

Miss Peggy Lee: A Career Chronicle by Robert Strom

The Dreyfus Affair and the Rise of the French Public Intellectual by Tom Conner

United States Marine Corps Generals of World War II: A Biographical Dictionary by George B. Clark

Characters and Plots in the Fiction of Kate Chopin by Robert L. Gale

Special Effects Artists: A Worldwide Biographical Dictionary of the Pre-Digital Era with a Filmography by Rolf Giesen

 

 

 

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PCA 2014 Recap

Editor Tara Prescott and contributor Rachel R. Martin are all smiles about Feminism in the Worlds of Neil Gaiman
Editor Tara Prescott and contributor Rachel R. Martin are all smiles about Feminism in the Worlds of Neil Gaiman
Author Katheryn Krotzer Laborde dares to open her work.
Author Katheryn Krotzer Laborde dares to open her work.
We’re not sure, but editor Matthew Wysocki may be explaining why CTRL-ALT-PLAY is perhaps even more satisfying than CTRL-ALT-DELETE.
We’re not sure, but editor Matthew Wysocki may be explaining why CTRL-ALT-PLAY is perhaps even more satisfying than CTRL-ALT-DELETE.
Yuya Kiuchi and fan.
Yuya Kiuchi and fan.
Clues editorial board member Rachel Schaffer shows off the latest.
Clues editorial board member Rachel Schaffer shows off the latest.
Hundreds of books to set up for the good people.  Happily, very few were left by meeting’s end.
Hundreds of books to set up for the good people. Happily, very few were left by meeting’s end.