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Newly Published: Alternate Worlds

New on our bookshelf today:

Alternate Worlds: The Illustrated History of Science Fiction, 3d ed.
James Gunn

Alternate Worlds was first published in 1975 and became an instant classic, winning a Hugo award. This third edition brings the history of science fiction up to date, covering developments over the past forty years—a period that has seen the advent of technologies only imagined in the genre’s Golden Age.

As a literature of change, science fiction has become ever more meaningful, presaging dangers to humanity and, as Alvin Toffler wrote, guarding against “the premature arrival of the future.” The world has begun to recognize science fiction in many different ways, incorporating its elements in products, visual media and huge conventions.

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Newly Published: The Muslim World in Post–9/11 American Cinema

New on our bookshelf today:

The Muslim World in Post–9/11 American Cinema: A Critical Study, 2001–2011
Kerem Bayraktaroğlu

Focusing on the decade following 9/11, this critical analysis examines the various portrayals of Muslims in American cinema. Comparison of pre– and post–9/11 films indicates a stereotype shift, influenced by factors other than just politics. The evolving definitions of male, female and child characters and of setting and landscape are described. The rise of the formidable American female character who dominates the weak Muslim male emerges as a common theme.

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Newly Published: The Hero and the Grave

New on our bookshelf today:

The Hero and the Grave: The Theme of Death in the Films of John Ford, Akira Kurosawa and Sergio Leone
Alireza Vahdani

The theme of death is an essential component of film narrative, particularly in how it affects the hero. Filmmakers from different cultures and backgrounds have developed distinct yet archetypal perspectives on death and the protagonist’s response. Focusing on Western and Japanese period genre films, the author examines the work of John Ford (1894–1973), Akira Kurosawa (1910–1998) and Sergio Leone (1929–1989) and finds similarities regarding death’s impact on the hero’s sense of morality.

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Newly Published: Carolina Beach Music Encyclopedia

New on our bookshelf today:

Carolina Beach Music Encyclopedia
Rick Simmons

While rock groups such as the Beach Boys and Jan and Dean defined the beach music of Southern California during the 1960s, a different, R&B influenced sound could be heard along South Carolina’s Grand Strand. Drawing on extensive research and exclusive interviews, this richly illustrated reference work covers the music, songwriters and performers who contributed to the genre of classic Carolina beach music from 1940 to 1980. Detailed entries tell the stories behind nearly 500 classic recordings, with release dates, label information, chart performance and biographical background on more than 200 artists.

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ERRATA: Reuben Fine: A Comprehensive Record of an American Chess Career, 1929–1951 by Aidan Woodger

NOTES CONCERNING THE 2018 PAPERBACK EDITION

I have continued to collect data (previously unknown games, notes and biographical information) for inclusion in a possible future revised edition of this work, Reuben Fine: A Comprehensive Record of an American Chess Career, 1929–1951. There are still considerable gaps in the record, particularly from the early years of Fine’s career and after the notebooks come to an end. I am happy to receive and acknowledge contributions which fill these lacunae. I remain contactable through the publisher, McFarland.

Aidan Woodger, August 2018

 

MINOR CORRECTIONS
iv for 1. Fine, Reuben, 1914- read 1. Fine, Reuben, 1914-1993
3 for Moby Dick read Moby-Dick
7 for candidates tournament read candidates’ tournament
13 for Rice Club Junior Masters read Rice Club Junior Masters (?)
32 for Marshall Clubs read Marshall Club
41 game 116 undo italicization of Aug.
42 game 120 add (Aug.) after 1933
43 game 121 result should read 0-1
43 for New York Sun, August 1933 read New York Sun, 1933
48 for 11.1933 read 1933 (Nov.)
52 for Fine 1 1 ½ ½ 0 ? ? ? 0 4 read Fine 1 1 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 4
52 for Denker 0 0½ ½ 1 ? ? ? 1 5 read Denker 0 0½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 5
61 game 183 for Marshall CC vs. Mercantile Library CC, Marshall Club, New York read Marshall CC vs. Mercantile Library CC, Franklin Hotel, Philadelphia
62 games 184 and 185 for (Nov.) read (Nov. ?) and undo italicization
69 for Hilbert & Lahde, 54-5. ½ read ½ Hilbert & Lahde, 54-5.
70 for 15…Nxf3 read 16…Nxf3
74 for 0-1 White resigned. read White resigned 0-1
80 for 35 Nxa4 Rxc7 36 Nxb6 read 35 Kxa4 Rxc7 36 Kb5
84 for 18. Rfd8 read 18. Rcd8
85 for 21. Bf1 Rf8 read 21. Bf1 Rc8; for 23. Qa4 Rfd8 read 23. Qa4 Rcd8
92 for in the previous diagram read after move 49
97 for 13 Bd5 Nd4 14 Qg4 read 13 Bd5 Nd4 14 Qh5
100 for 13…Nxd5 13 Nxd5 exd5 read 12…Nxd5 13 Nxd5 exd5
102 for 9…Bc5 10 Nd4 read 9…Bb4 10 Nd4
109 for B. h2 h6 read B. 42 h2 h6
121 for 20.Qa4?! read 20.Ba4
128 for 12 Bxc4 Qc7 wins a pawn (13 Qb3 Ne5) read 11 Bxc4 Qc7 wins a pawn (12 Qb3 Ne5)
144 for the Ukraine read Ukraine
149 for 18 Rxf4 Qxg4 read 18 Rf4 Qxg4
154 for 11 Qxe5 Re8 Qb2 read 11 Qxe5 Re8 12 Qb2
186 for Threatening 23…Bb6 read Threatening 23…Bb3
187 for 30…Rc1 31 Nxb3 was also very good. HK 31 Nxf5 read 30…Rc1 31 Nxf5 31 Nxb3 was also very good. HK
189 his opponent’s centre
193 for 25 Bxg7 Bxf1 Be5 read 25 Bxg7 Bxf1 26 Be5
197 for 23 Bxc6 bxc6 Na7 read 23 Bxc6 bxc6 24 Na7
200 for Black resigned. Fine in The Chess Review 1938, 139-40. 1-0 read Black resigned. 1-0 Fine in The Chess Review 1938, 139-40.
205 place 17 Qxb5 …AW in parentheses () and replace 17 Qxb5 with 17…Qxb5
205 for 8…Nge7 9 Nd6+ Kf8 10 Qf4 Nf5 11 Nxf6!? Read 8…Nge7 9 Nd6+ Kf8 10 Qf4 Nf5 11 Nxf7!?
206 for Capablanca – Ståhlberg read Ståhlberg – Capablanca
207 for 45 Bxb7 Kxa2 46 Bxc6 Kxb3 47 c1 a4 read 45 Bxb7 Kxa2 46 Bxc6 Kxb3 47 Kf1 a4
209 for Tartakower give read Tartakower gave
222 for 25.07.1939 read 1939 (25 July)
222 for 17 Qb1 read 17 Qc1
224 entries in table should read:
2  Hanauer       0 * ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 13
8  Green                       1 0 1 0 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 9
9= Bernstein     0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 8½
9= Donovan     0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ * 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 8½
12 Sanatasiere  0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 * ½ 1 ½ 0 1 7
226 for Now White must not read Now Black must not
228 for Safonov – Bohatirchuk read Savonov – Bogatirev
233 for (In view of unavoidable mate, Black resigned.) Based on notes by Reinfeld in Chess Review, May-June 1940 (Hilbert 2002a, 126-7). 1–0 read (In view of unavoidable mate, Black resigned.) 1–0 Based on notes by Reinfeld in Chess Review, May-June 1940 (Hilbert 2002a, 126-7).
233 for strategem read stratagem
238 for U.S. F read U.S.C.F.
240 for 24.08.1940 read 1940
250 for Queen’s Gambit Declined read Catalan Opening
251 for Williams, M read Williams, Mrs. R
266 for Reshevky read Reshevsky
271 for Black resigned read White resigned.
273 for to strong read too strong
275 for may 1944 read May 1944
278 for Team Match Washington, (1944) read 13th McCoy-Hatfield Match, Divan CC, Washington, 1944 (7 June)
278 for Exhibition Game Washington read Exhibition Game, Washington
280 for 5.Qxc4Be6 read 5.Qxc4 Be6
280 for 17.Nb3 18.Bg3 read 17.Nb3 Ne6 18.Bg3; for 129.Qf2 read 29.Qf2; for 50.Kd3 51.f4+ read 50.Kd3 Nc7 51.f4+
282 for Broderman :50)1-0 read Broderman :50) 1-0
284 for Fine 1:58)0-1 read Fine 1:58) 0-1
291 for 20.Qc2 d5 21.Rab1 read 20.Qe2 d5 21.Rac1
300 for 41 Ne5 g5 read 41 Ne5 g4
301 for 45.Nd6 Ke5 44.Nc4+ Kd5 read 45.Nd6 Ke6 44.Nc4 Kd5
301 for Match New York (4) read Match New Jersey (4); and for Match New York (7) read Match New Jersey (7)
305 for If 10 h6 read If 10…h6
311 for On 26…Rxd8 27 Be2 read On 26…Rd8 27 Be2
325 for Los Angeles Times, 15 September, 1940. ½-½ read ½-½ Los Angeles Times, 15 September, 1940.
348 for Issak read Isaak
351 for ben-factor read benefactor
352 for Montgomery read Montgomerie (same pages 379 and 388)
354 for Oympiads read Olympiads; for indivdual read individual
357 for Metropolitan League, April 1933 read Metropolitan League, April 1934
363 for contibuted read contributed; for Wasy read Way
365 for a number of position read a number of positions; for [email protected] read [email protected].uk
367 for visuaslize read visualize
370 for Artur read Arthur
371 for against Against read against
372 for reseachers read researchers
380 for Reshevsky, S 60, 61, 128, 168 read Reshevsky, S 60, 61, 128, 169
383 for Fedration read Federation
389 for Kers read Keres
391 for the Ukraine read Ukraine
Znosko-Borovsky for Znovsko-Borovsky

FURTHER READING (ADDENDA TO BIBLIOGRAPHY)

1932 Pasadena: Sherwood, Brandreth & Monson (2011) Pasadena 1932 International Chess Tournament Yorklyn, DE: Caissa Editions

1938 A.V.R.O: Sherwood and Brandreth (2010) AVRO 1938 International Chess Tournament Yorklyn, DE: Caissa Editions

G.G. Toradze (ed) (2006) AVRO-Turnir: Coctyazanie cil’neyshikh grossmeysterov mira Gollandia, 1938 god Moscow, Galeriya

1939 23rd Marshall Club championship Croxen (2006) “The Russian myth of Lasker’s last tournament” in Quarterly for Chess History 12 7-21

Apsenieks Salmins, G Fricis Apsenieks 1894-1941 (2006) Liepaja

Fine Ansel “Unknown games of Reuben Fine” Quarterly for Chess History 16 486-502; Kasparov, G with the participation of Plisetsky, D (2004) “The Fine enigma” in Garry Kasparov on Fischer: My Great Predecessors Part IV London: Everyman Chess

Kashdan Lahde, P (2009) Isaac Kashdan, American Chess Grandmaster: A career summary with 757 games Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company

Najdorf Lissowski, T Mikhalchisin, A & Najdorf, L with notes by Najdorf, M (2005) Najdorf: life and games London: Batsford

Petrovs Fride, A (2004) Vladimirs Petrovs: a chessplayer’s story from greatness to the gulags Yorklyn, DE: Caissa Editions

Thomas, George Paige, R (2005) The Chess Games of Sir George Alan Thomas Liskeard: Diggory Press

Angos, Dr. A (2007) Castles with Knights and Bishops Impala Press

Euwe, M (English edition, 2013) The Hague-Moscow 1948: match/tournament for the World Chess Championship Russell Enterprises: Milford CT

Fine, R 1965 The Teenage Chess Book New York

Hearst, E & Knott, J (2009) Blindfold Chess: history, psychology, techniques, champions, world records and important games Jefferson, NC: McFarland

Lombardy, W (2012) Understanding Chess: my system, my games, my life New York: Lombardy/Russell Enterprises

Tkachenko, S (2017) Odesskie Taynuy Moscow: Andrei Elkov

Tkachenko, S (2018) Alekhine’s Odessa Secrets Great Britain (Amazon): Elk and Ruby

Suetin, A 2010 Soviet Chess Strategy Glasgow: Quality Chess

Ansel, A 2011’Unknown games of Reuben Fine’ in Quarterly for Chess History 16, 486-502

 

ADDITIONAL GAMES

() Denker, Arnold Sheldon – Fine

Denker-Fine Match, New York (5), 1934
Two Knights Defence [C56]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.0–0 Nxe4 6.Re1 d5 7.Bxd5 Qxd5 8.Nc3 Qd8 The usual move is 8…Qa5, which is considered even. LP 9.Rxe4+ Be7 10.Nxd4 f5! On a score sheet sent to this writer, GM Denker gave Black’s last move a “?”, but ECO (C/56) gives it an “!”. LP 11.Rxe7+ The known move here is Hartlaub’s 11 Bh6, when Perfiliev – Botvinnik (Leningrad, 1925) continued 11…fxe4 12 Bxg7 Nxd4 13 Qh5+ Kd7 14 Bxd4 Rf8, and Black consolidated to victory. However, according to Robert Wade, White could have gained a perpetual by 14 Rd1 Bf6 15 Qd5+. Mestel – Bronstein (London, 1976) followed the saner 11 Bh6 0–0 which proved even after 12 Nxc6 bxc6 13 Rd4 Qe8 14 Bf4 Bf6 15 Rd3 Qf7! – but not 15…Rf7? 16 Re3 Re7 17 Nd5! Rxe3 18 Nxf6+ gxf6 19 Bxe3, when White won easily in Schmid – Hooper (Hastings 1951). LP 11…Nxe7 12.Bg5 0–0 (According to Parr, Fritz recommended 12…c6, but this loses to 13 Qh5+ g6 14 Qh4. AW) 13.Ndb5 Qxd1+ 14.Rxd1 Ng6 15.Nxc7 Rb8 16.h4 h6 (Junior 9 recommends 16…f4! 17 N7d5 Be6 18 h5 Rf5 19 hxg6 Rxg5. AW) 17.h5 hxg5 18.hxg6 b6 19.N3d5 Rb7 20.f4 g4?? A horrendous blunder. Black had to play 20…Rxc7, when White has a better endgame. LP 21.Ne7+ Kh8 22.Kf2 1–0 Larry Parr ‘Grandmaster Arnold Denker (1914-2005) “The man whom chess loved”’, Chess Life March 2005, 14–15 (166-7).

() Fine – Denker, Arnold Sheldon

Denker-Fine Match, New York (6), 1934
Sicilian Defence, Paulsen Variation [B45]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Ndb5 Bb4 7.a3 Bxc3+ 8.Nxc3 d5 9.exd5 exd5 10.Bd3 0–0 11.0–0 d4 12.Ne2 Nd5 13.Be4!? Re8 14.Bxd5?! Qxd5 15.c3?! Bg4 16.f3 d3 17.Nf4 Qc5+ 18.Kh1 Bf5 19.Nxd3 Bxd3?! 20.Qxd3 Rad8 21.Qc2 Nd4 22.Qf2 Re2 23.Qh4 Ne6 24.Bf4 Qc4 25.Bg3 Qxh4 26.Bxh4 Rdd2 27.Rg1 Rxb2 Black won on move 43. 0–1 Larry Parr ‘Grandmaster Arnold Denker (1914-2005) “The man whom chess loved”’, Chess Life March 2005, 14–15 (166-7).

() Fine – Jonsson, Emil

Match vs Emil Jonsson, Stockholm (1), 1937
Reti Opening [A09]

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 e6 3.Bg2 c5 4.0–0 Nc6 5.c4 d4 6.d3 Nf6 7.e3 Be7 8.exd4 cxd4 9.Re1 0–0 10.Nbd2 Qb6 11.b3 Bd7 12.a3 a5 13.Bb2 Rfe8 14.Rc1 Bc5 15.Ng5 h6 16.Nge4 Nxe4 17.Nxe4 e5 18.Nxc5 Qxc5 19.Rb1 Rab8 20.b4 axb4 21.axb4 Qxb4 22.Bxd4 Qd6 23.Bc3 Bf5 24.Re3 f6 25.Rb5 Be6 26.Qb1 Re7 27.Rb6 Qa3 28.d4 exd4 29.Bxd4 Qd6 30.Bxc6 1–0 ChessBase

() Jonsson, Emil – Fine

Match vs Emil Jonsson, Stockholm (2), 1937
Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D27]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 a6 5.a4 e6 6.e3 c5 7.Bxc4 Nc6 8.0–0 Be7 9.Bd3 0–0 10.dxc5 Bxc5 11.e4 Qc7 12.Bg5 Ng4 13.Bh4 Nge5 14.Nxe5 Nxe5 15.Rc1 Qb6 16.Bb1 f6 17.Nd5 Qa5 18.Rxc5 Qxc5 19.b4 Qa7 20.Ne7+ Kh8 21.Kh1 b5 22.f4 Ng6 23.Nxg6+ hxg6 24.f5 exf5 25.exf5 Bxf5 26.Rxf5 gxf5 27.Qh5+ Kg8 28.Bxf5 g5 29.Be6+ Kg7 30.Bxg5 Rh8 31.Qg4 Rxh2+ 32.Kxh2 fxg5 33.Qxg5+ Kh8 34.Bf5 Qc7+ 35.g3 ½–½ ChessBase

() Fine – Fox, A

Clock exhibition Washington D.C., 10.11.1943
Queen’s Gambit Declined [D06]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 Bf5 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Qb3 Nc6 6.c5 Qd7 7.Bf4 Be7 8.e3 a6 9.Be2 0–0 10.0–0 Rab8 11.Qd1 Qc8 12.Rc1 Nh5 13.a3 Nxf4 14.exf4 Bf6 15.b4 Qd8 16.Qd2 Bg4 17.Ne5 Bxe2 18.Nxe2 Bxe5 19.fxe5 Ne7 20.f4 c6 21.g4 g6 22.Ng3 Kh8 23.Rc3 Rg8 24.Rcf3 Qf8 25.Kh1 Qh6 26.Qg2 Rbf8 27.Qf2 Qg7 28.f5 gxf5 29.gxf5 exf5 30.Nxf5 Nxf5 31.Rxf5 Qg6 32.Rg1 Qxg1+ 33.Qxg1 Rxg1+ 34.Kxg1 Kg7 35.Rf6 Re8 36.Rd6 Re7 37.Kf2 Kf8 38.Kf3 Re6 39.Rd8+ Re8 40.Rxe8+ Kxe8 41.Kg4 Kf8 42.Kg5 Kg7 43.h3 Kf8 44.Kf6 h6 45.h4 Ke8 46.Kg7 Ke7 47.Kxh6 f6 48.exf6+ Kxf6 49.h5 Kf7 50.Kg5 Kg7 51.h6+ Kh7 52.Kh5 Kg8 53.Kg6 Kh8 54.h7 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 500 from The Divan News December 1943.

() Fine – Korsstrom, L

Clock exhibition Washington D.C., 10.11.1943
Spanish Game [C86]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Qe2 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.a4 Bg4 9.c3 Rb8 10.Rd1 0–0 11.d4 Na5 12.Bc2 Nc4 13.b3 Nb6 14.dxe5 Nfd7 15.axb5 Nxe5 16.bxa6 Bf6 17.Nbd2 Nxf3+ 18.Nxf3 Bxc3 19.Rb1 Qe7 20.Be3 Nd7 21.h3 Bh5 22.g4 Bg6 23.Bd4 Bb4 24.Qc4 c5 25.Bb2 h5 26.Kg2 Nb6 27.Qe2 d5 28.Ne5 hxg4 29.hxg4 Rbe8 30.f4 Bxe4+ 31.Bxe4 dxe4 32.Rh1 Nd5 33.Qxe4 Nf6 34.Rh3 Nxe4 35.Rbh1 g6 36.Rh8+ Kg7 37.Nd7+ 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 500 from The Divan News December 1943.

() Fine – Klein, H

December rapids Washington D.C., 15.12.1943
Queen’s Gambit Declined [D50]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 c6 5.e4 dxe4 6.Nxe4 Bb4+ 7.Nc3 Qa5 8.Bd2 Nbd7 9.Nf3 Qc7 10.Bd3 h6 11.0–0 0–0 12.Re1 Re8 13.Qe2 Nf8 14.Ne5 Qd8 15.Rad1 Bd6 16.Qf3 Qe7 17.Qg3 Kh8 18.Nxf7+ Qxf7 19.Qxd6 Bd7 20.Ne4 Rad8 21.Qg3 Qh5 22.Nd6 Re7 23.f3 Bc8 24.h4 Red7 25.c5 b6 26.Re5 g5 27.hxg5 hxg5 28.Bxg5 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 500–501 from The Divan News January 1944.

() Fine – Skraly, E

December rapids Washington D.C., 15.12.1943
Sicilian Defence [B81]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.g4 Be7 7.g5 Nfd7 8.Qh5 Ne5 9.f4 Nec6 10.Be3 g6 11.Qe2 f6 12.h4 Nxd4 13.Bxd4 Nc6 14.Be3 Rf8 15.0–0–0 Bd7 16.h5 fxg5 17.hxg6 hxg6 18.Qg4 Qa5 19.Bc4 gxf4 20.Bxf4 0–0–0 21.Bd2 Ne5 22.Qe2 Nxc4 23.Qxc4+ Kb8 24.Rh7 Bf6 25.Qb3 Bc8 26.Nd5 Qc5 27.Be3 Qc6 28.Nxf6 Rxf6 29.Bg5 Qxe4 30.Qc3 Rf3 31.Qc7+ Ka8 32.Qxd8 Qc4 33.Rc7 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 501 from The Divan News January 1944.

() Fine – Denker, Arnold

National Rapid Transit preliminaries New York, 25.06.1944
Queen’s Gambit Declined [D53]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.e3 Be7 6.Nf3 Ne4 7.Bxe7 Qxe7 8.cxd5 Nxc3 9.bxc3 exd5 10.Qb3 c6 11.Bd3 0–0 12.0–0 Kh8 13.Rae1 Nf6 14.Nd2 Qc7 15.f3 Be6 16.Qb2 Rad8 17.e4 c5 18.e5 Ng8 19.f4 f5 20.exf6 Rxf6 21.Nf3 Rdf8 22.g3 c4 23.Bxh7 Bh3 24.Bb1 Bxf1 25.Rxf1 Rh6 26.Ne5 Qb6 27.Qc2 Ne7 28.Nd7 Qd8 29.Nxf8 Qxf8 30.Qe2 Nf5 31.Qe5 Rf6 32.Re1 Nd6 33.Qxd5 b5 34.Re5 Rh6 35.Rh5 Nf7 36.Rxh6+ gxh6 37.Qf5 Qg7 38.Qxb5 Kg8 39.Qxc4 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 502 from The Divan News July 1 1944.

() Fine – Lasker, Edward

National Rapid Transit, New York, 1944 (25 June)
Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D26]

1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e6 4.Bxc4 c5 5.0–0 Nc6 6.d4 cxd4 7.exd4 Nf6 8.Nc3 a6 9.Be3 b5 10.Bd3 Nb4 11.Bb1 Bb7 12.Ne5 Nbd5 13.Qf3 Qc7 14.Qh3 Nxc3 15.bxc3 Bd6 16.Bd3 Bxe5 17.dxe5 Nd7 18.f4 Qxc3 19.Rad1 Nc5 20.Bb1 Ne4 21.Rd4 Nc5 22.Rc1 Qa3 23.Qg3 0–0 24.f5 Rac8 25.f6 g6 26.Qf4 Kh8 27.Qh6 Qxc1+ 28.Bxc1 1–0 Andy Ansel in Quarterly for Chess History 16, 502 from The Divan News, 1 July, 1944.

() Cheney, R – Fine

Special rapid Washington D.C., 30.09.1944
King’s Indian Defence [A48]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.Bf4 Bg7 4.c3 0–0 5.e3 d6 6.Be2 Nbd7 7.h3 b6 8.Nbd2 Bb7 9.0–0 Nd5 10.Bg3 e5 11.c4 Ne7 12.d5 h6 13.e4 f5 14.Bd3 Qe8 15.Qc2 f4 16.Bh2 g5 17.b4 Qg6 18.Kh1 h5 19.Rg1 g4 20.hxg4 hxg4 21.Nh4 Qh5 22.g3 f3 23.Nf1 Ng6 24.Ne3 Bf6 25.Nef5 Kf7 26.Qd2 Rh8 27.Rac1 Nxh4 28.gxh4 Bxh4 29.Rc3 Bg5 30.Qe1 Qxh2# 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 493 from The Divan News November 1944.

() Fine – Johnson, R

Special rapid Washington D.C., 30.09.1944
[A25]

1.e3 e5 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 Nc6 4.g3 Nf6 5.Bg2 Be7 6.f4 0–0 7.Nf3 exf4 8.gxf4 Bg4 9.0–0 d5 10.cxd5 Nxd5 11.Qe1 Nf6 12.Qg3 Qd3 13.Ne5 Qf5 14.e4 Qh5 15.Nxc6 bxc6 16.d4 Be2 17.Nxe2 Qxe2 18.Be3 Rab8 19.b3 Nh5 20.Qh3 g6 21.f5 Qd3 22.Rad1 Qa6 23.Bh6 Rfe8 24.fxg6 hxg6 25.Qf3 Bf6 26.e5 Kh7 27.Bc1 Bg7 28.Qxf7 Rf8 29.Qe6 Rfe8 30.Qg4 Qxa2 31.Be4 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 494 from The Divan News November 1944.

() Fine – Turover, I

Special rapid Washington D.C., 30.09.1944
Three Knights Opening [C46]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 d6 4.d4 Bg4 5.Bb5 Nf6 6.dxe5 dxe5 7.Qxd8+ Kxd8 8.Bxc6 Bxf3 9.Bxb7 Bxg2 10.Bxa8 Bxh1 11.Ke2 Bb4 12.Be3 Ke7 13.Bc6 Bxc3 14.Bc5+ Ke6 15.Rxh1 Bd4 16.Ba3 Rb8 17.c3 Bb6 18.Rd1 g6 19.Kf3 a5 20.Ba4 Ba7 21.Bb3+ Rxb3 22.axb3 Nh5 23.Rd8 c5 24.Ra8 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 494 from The Divan News November 1944.

() Fine – Berliner, Hans

Simul Washington D.C., 08.11.1944
English Opening [A32]

1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Bb4 6.e3 0–0 7.Bd3 d5 8.0–0 Nc6 9.cxd5 exd5 10.Nce2 Re8 11.Bd2 Bd6 12.h3 Ne5 13.Bc2 Ne4 14.Be1 Bd7 15.Nf4 Nf6 16.Bc3 b5 17.Nf5 Bxf5 18.Bxf5 Bc7 19.Rc1 g6 20.Bb1 Rc8 21.Qb3 g5 22.Ne2 Qd6 23.Ng3 a5 24.Rfd1 b4 25.Bd4 Nc4 26.Qd3 Ne4 27.Nxe4 dxe4 28.Qxc4 Qh2+ 29.Kf1 Qh1+ 30.Ke2 Qxg2 31.Rg1 Qf3+ 32.Ke1 Bg3 33.Rxg3 Rxc4 34.Rxc4 Qh1+ 35.Kd2 Qxb1 36.Rxg5+ Kf8 37.Bc5+ Re7 38.Rc2 Qf1 39.Bxe7+ Kxe7 40.Re5+ Kd6 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 495 from The Divan News, December 1944.

() Fine – Leithiser, H

Simul Washington D.C., 08.11.1944
Sicilian Dragon [B34]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.0–0 Nxe4 8.Nxc6 Nxc3 9.Nxd8 Nxd1 10.Nxf7 Nc3 11.Bc4 d5 12.Nxh8 dxc4 13.bxc3 Bxc3 14.Rb1 Bxh8 15.Ba3 a6 16.Rfe1 Bf6 17.Rb6 Kf7 18.Bc5 Rb8 19.Reb1 Be5 20.Bxe7 Bc7 21.Bd6 Bxd6 22.Rxd6 b5 23.Rd8 Ra8 24.Re1 Bb7 25.Rd7+ Kg8 26.Rxb7 Rd8 27.g3 Rd2 28.Re8# 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 494-5 from The Divan News, December 1944.

() Fine – Mugridge, Donald

Simul Washington D.C., 08.11.1944
English Opening [A20]

1.c4 e5 2.Nf3 e4 3.Nd4 Nc6 4.Nxc6 dxc6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.g3 Bc5 7.Bg2 0–0 8.0–0 Bf5 9.Kh1 Qd4 10.f3 exf3 11.Rxf3 Bg6 12.Rf4 Ng4 13.Qf1 Nf2+ 14.Rxf2 Qxf2 15.Qxf2 Bxf2 16.e3 Rad8 17.Bf3 Rfe8 18.Kg2 Be1 19.d4 c5 20.Bxb7 cxd4 21.exd4 Rxd4 22.Bc6 Re7 23.Bg5 f6 24.Bf4 Bxc3 25.bxc3 Be4+ 0–1 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 495 from The Divan News, December 1944.

() Fine – Turover, I

Blindfold clock simul Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
Scandinavian Defence [B01]

1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.Bb5+ Bd7 4.Bc4 Bg4 5.f3 Bf5 6.Nc3 Nbd7 7.d6 exd6 8.d4 Nb6 9.Bd3 Bxd3 10.Qxd3 d5 11.Nge2 c6 12.Ng3 Bd6 13.Nf5 0–0 14.0–0 Re8 15.Bg5 Bf8 16.f4 h6 17.Bh4 Nbd7 18.Rad1 Qb6 19.b3 g6 20.Ne3 Nc5 21.Qe2 Nce4 22.Nxe4 Nxe4 23.Qd3 Qb4 24.f5 Qc3 25.fxg6 fxg6 26.Ng4 Bg7 27.Bf6 Qxd3 28.Rxd3 Rf8 29.Bxg7 Rxf1+ 30.Kxf1 Kxg7 31.Ke1 Rf8 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 496 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Burdge, H

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
[D03]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bg5 Bf5 4.e3 e6 5.Bd3 Bg6 6.Nc3 Nbd7 7.Ne5 Be7 8.f4 0–0 9.0–0 Nxe5 10.fxe5 Nd7 11.Bf4 c5 12.Bxg6 hxg6 13.Qd3 a6 14.Rf3 b5 15.Raf1 Rc8 16.Ne2 Qc7 17.c3 b4 18.e4 dxe4 19.Qxe4 cxd4 20.Nxd4 bxc3 21.bxc3 Qc4 22.R1f2 Nb6 23.Bd2 Qd5 24.Qxd5 Nxd5 25.Kf1 Bc5 26.Be1 Bxd4 27.cxd4 Rc4 28.Ra3 Ra8 29.Rd2 a5 30.Rb3 Rac8 31.Rb7 a4 32.Ra7 Ne3+ 33.Kf2 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 496-7 from The Divan News February 1945

() Fine – Johnson, R

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
Bishop’s Opening [C23]

1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 b5 3.Bxb5 Bc5 4.Nf3 Qf6 5.0–0 Ne7 6.c3 Qb6 7.Bc4 Ng6 8.d4 exd4 9.cxd4 Be7 10.Nc3 c6 11.d5 0–0 12.e5 Ba6 13.Qe2 Re8 14.Be3 Qb7 15.dxc6 dxc6 16.Rfd1 Nf8 17.Rd2 Bxc4 18.Qxc4 Nbd7 19.Rad1 Nb6 20.Qg4 Qa6 21.b3 Qa5 22.Ne4 Nd5 23.Bd4 Ne6 24.h4 Bb4 25.Rc2 Rac8 26.h5 Qd8 27.Rcc1 a5 28.Bb2 Kh8 29.h6 Rg8 30.Nd6 Bxd6 31.exd6 Nf6 32.hxg7+ 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 496 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Kurtz, M

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
Catalan Opening [E01]

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Qa4+ Qd7 6.Qxc4 Qc6 7.Nbd2 Qxc4 8.Nxc4 c5 9.Bg2 Nc6 10.dxc5 Bxc5 11.a3 0–0 12.b4 Be7 13.b5 Nb8 14.a4 Nbd7 15.0–0 Nc5 16.Ba3 Re8 17.a5 Bd7 18.Nd4 Rad8 19.a6 b6 20.Ne5 Nd5 21.Ndc6 Bxc6 22.Nxc6 Rd7 23.Rac1 Bd6 24.Rfd1 Nb3 25.Rb1 Bxa3 26.Rxb3 Bc5 27.Rbd3 Rc7 28.Bxd5 exd5 29.e3 Kf8 30.Rxd5 f6 31.Rd7 Rcc8 32.Rxa7 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 497 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Shapiro, Oscar

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
English Opening [A22]

1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.d3 b6 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.e3 d6 6.Be2 Be7 7.d4 0–0 8.0–0 Bb7 9.b3 Qd7 10.Bb2 exd4 11.Nxd4 Nxd4 12.Qxd4 Qf5 13.Rad1 Rfd8 14.Nd5 Qd7 15.Bf3 Bxd5 16.cxd5 a5 17.Rc1 Rdb8 18.Rxc7?? Qxc7 0–1 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 497 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Stark, Martin

Blindfold clock Washington D.C., 13.01.1945
Queen’s Gambit, Slav Defence [D15]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 dxc4 5.e3 b5 6.a4 b4 7.Nb1 e6 8.Bxc4 Nbd7 9.0–0 Bb7 10.Qe2 c5 11.Rd1 Qc7 12.Nbd2 Be7 13.a5 0–0 14.Bd3 Rfd8 15.Nc4 Ng4 16.h3 Ngf6 17.Bd2 Be4 18.Rac1 Qb7 19.Bxe4 Nxe4 20.Be1 Qa6 21.Qc2 Ndf6 22.Nfe5 cxd4 23.exd4 Rdc8 24.Qa4 Nd5 25.Qb3 Nef6 26.Rc2 Rc7 27.Rdc1 Rac8 28.Qd3 h6 29.b3 Qb5 30.Nxf7 Nf4 31.Qf3 Nxh3+ 32.Qxh3 Kxf7 33.Ne5+ 1–0 Ansel QCH 16, 497 from The Divan News February 1945.

() Fine – Egan, R

Blindfold rapid exhibition Washington D.C., 25.04.1945
[A52]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 Ng4 4.Bf4 Bb4+ 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Nf3 Qe7 7.Qd5 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 Qa3 9.Qd2 Qe7 10.Qd5 Qa3 11.Rc1 f6 12.exf6 Nxf6 13.Qd2 d6 14.e3 0–0 15.Bd3 Bg4 16.Nd4 Nxd4 17.cxd4 Rae8 18.0–0 Nh5 19.Bg3 Nxg3 20.hxg3 Qa4 21.Qc2 Qxc2 22.Rxc2 Bc8 23.Be2 c6 24.Rd1 Re7 25.Bf3 Bf5 26.Rb2 g5 27.g4 Bc8 28.Re1 Be6 29.d5 cxd5 30.cxd5 Bf7 31.Rc1 Bg6 32.Rb4 Kg7 33.Rbc4 Rff7 34.Rc8 h6 35.Ra8 a6 36.Rcc8 Kf6 37.Rd8 Rd7 38.Rxd7 Rxd7 39.Rh8 Rh7 40.Rc8 Re7 41.Kf1 Rg7 42.Ke2 Re7 43.Kd2 Ke5 44.Kc3 Be4 45.Bxe4 Kxe4 46.Rh8 Kxd5 47.Rxh6 b5 48.Rg6 Re5 49.Kd3 a5 50.g3 a4 51.f4 gxf4 52.gxf4 Re8 53.Rg5+ Kc6 54.f5 b4 55.f6 b3 56.axb3 axb3 57.Rf5 b2 58.Kc2 Rxe3 59.f7 Re2+ 60.Kb1 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 488 from The Divan News, May 1945.

() Fine – Thomas, H

Blindfold rapid exhibition Washington D.C., 25.04.1945
Spanish Game, Open Variation [C83]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Be7 10.Nbd2 0–0 11.Bc2 Nxd2 12.Qxd2 Na5 13.Qf4 c5 14.Qg3 Re8 15.Ng5 g6 16.Nxe6 fxe6 17.Bxg6 hxg6 18.Qxg6+ Kh8 19.Qh6+ Kg8 20.Qg6+ Kh8 21.Qh6+ Kg8 22.Qxe6+ Kh8 23.Qh6+ Kg8 24.Qg6+ Kh8 25.Bh6 Bf8 26.Bg5 Be7 27.f4 Nc4 28.Rf3 Bxg5 29.fxg5 1–0 Ansel in Quarterly for Chess History 16, 486-7 from The Divan News, May 1945

() Leithiser, H – Fine

Blindfold rapid exhibition Washington DC, Divan CC, 25.04.1945
Sicilian Defence [B45]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Be2 Bb4 7.e5 Nxe5 8.Bd2 0–0 9.0–0 d5 10.f4 Nc6 11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.Bf3 Ba6 13.Re1 Rb8 14.a3 Bc5+ 15.Kh1 Bf2 16.Re5 Nd7 17.Rh5 Rxb2 18.Na4 Rb7 19.f5 g6 20.fxg6 fxg6 21.Rh3 Qf6 22.Bc3 Qf5 23.Qd2 Qxh3 24.gxh3 Rxf3 25.Qh6 d4 26.Bb4 Bc4 27.Nc5 Bd5 28.Kg2 Nxc5 29.Bxc5 Rf5+ 30.Kf1 Be3+ 0–1 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 486 from The Divan News, May 1945.

() Fine – Pinkus, Al

U.S. Lightning championship prelim A New York, 24.06.1945
Nimzowitsch Indian Defence [E33]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 d5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.Qxc3 0–0 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.Bg5 a5 9.e3 h6 10.Bh4 a4 11.Bd3 Na5 12.cxd5 exd5 13.0–0 c6 14.Bc2 b5 15.Ne5 Bd7 16.Bxf6 gxf6 17.Qd3 f5 18.Qe2 Be6 19.f4 Nc4 20.Qh5 Qf6 21.Rf3 Kh7 22.g4 Rg8 23.g5 Nxe5 24.dxe5 Qg6 25.Rh3 Qxh5 26.Rxh5 Rg6 27.Kf2 Rag8 28.Rg1 R8g7 29.Rg3 Kg8 30.gxh6 Rxg3 31.hxg3 Rg6 32.h7+ Kh8 33.Bxf5 Bxf5 34.Rxf5 Rg7 35.Rh5 Rxh7 36.Rxh7+ Kxh7 37.f5 c5 38.Ke2 Kg7 39.g4 Kf8 40.g5 Ke7 41.Kd3 Kf8 42.Kc3 Ke8 43.b3 Kf8 44.bxa4 bxa4 45.Kd3 Ke8 46.Ke2 Ke7 47.Kf3 Kf8 48.Ke2 Ke7 49.Kf3 Kf8 50.Ke2 Ke7 51.Kf3 Kf8 52.Ke2 Ke7 53.Kd3 Kf8 54.Kc3 Ke7 55.Kd2 Kf8 56.f6 Ke8 57.e6 fxe6 58.g6 e5 59.e4 d4 60.Kd3 Kf8 61.Kc4 Ke8 62.Kd5 d3 63.Ke6 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 498-9 from The Divan News July 1945.

() Mugridge, Donald – Fine

U.S. Lightning championship prelim A New York, 24.06.1945
English Opening, Symmetrical [A31]

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.Nc3 Bb4 7.Bg5 h6 8.Bxf6 Qxf6 9.e4 Bxc3+ 10.bxc3 0–0 11.Bd3 d6 12.0–0 Bg4 13.h3 Bxf3 14.Qxf3 Qxf3 15.gxf3 Na5 16.Rab1 Rfc8 17.Rfd1 Kf8 18.Rb5 b6 19.Bf1 Ke7 20.Rbd5 Rc6 21.Kg2 Rac8 22.Kg3 Nxc4 23.Bxc4 Rxc4 24.R1d3 R8c5 25.f4 Rxd5 26.Rxd5 f6 27.f3 Rc8 28.fxe5 fxe5 29.Rd3 Rc4 30.Kg4 g6 31.Kg3 Ra4 32.Rd2 Ke6 33.Kh4 a5 34.Re2 Rc4 35.Re3 b5 0–1 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 498 from The Divan News July 1945.

() Fine – Berliner, Hans

Blindfold rapid simul Washington D.C., 27.06.1945
Catalan Opening [A45]

1.d4 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 Bf5 4.Nf3 e6 5.0–0 Bd6 6.c4 c6 7.Nbd2 Nbd7 8.Nh4 Bg6 9.Qb3 Qc8 10.Re1 0–0 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.e4 dxe4 13.Nxe4 Nxe4 14.Rxe4 e5 15.dxe5 Nc5 16.Qc2 Nxe4 17.Bxe4 Bxe5 18.Be3 Qe6 19.Re1 Rfd8 20.b4 Bd4 21.b5 Rd6 22.bxc6 bxc6 23.h4 Rad8 24.h5 gxh5?? 25.Bxd4 Qg4 26.Bc3 Rd1 27.Kg2 Rxe1 28.Bxe1 h4 29.Bf5 Qd1 30.Qxd1 Rxd1 31.Bb4 hxg3 32.Kxg3 Rd4 33.Bc5 Rxc4 34.Bxa7 Ra4 35.Be3 Rxa2 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 490–91 from The Divan News August 1945.

() Fine – Rousseau, Henry

Blindfold rapid simul Washington D.C., 27.06.1945
Sicilian Defence [B20]

1.e4 c5 2.Ne2 Nf6 3.Nbc3 d5 4.exd5 Nxd5 5.g3 Nxc3 6.Nxc3 Nc6 7.Bg2 Bf5 8.0–0 e6 9.d3 Be7 10.Be3 Rc8 11.Ne4 b6 12.f4 h5 13.Qe2 Bf6 14.c3 g6 15.Rad1 Bg7 16.Ng5 0–0 17.Rd2 Qe7 18.Nf3 e5 19.fxe5 Nxe5 20.Nxe5 Qxe5 21.d4 cxd4 22.cxd4 Qe7 23.Qf2 Rfe8 24.Re1 Qd7 25.d5 Be4 26.d6 Bxg2 27.Qxg2 Re6 28.Qd5 Rce8 29.Rde2 Rxd6 30.Qc4 Rde6 31.b4 Qe7 32.Kf2 Qf6+ 33.Kg2 Qf5 34.Bf2 Rxe2 35.Rxe2 Rxe2 36.Qxe2 Qd5+ 37.Kg1 Bd4 38.b5 Bxf2+ 39.Kxf2 Qh1 40.Ke3 Qd5 41.Kf2 ½–½ Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 491 from The Divan News August 1945.

() Fine – Shapiro, Oscar

Blindfold rapid simul Washington D.C., 27.06.1945
English Opening, Classical Defence [A28]

1.c4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Bb4 6.e3 d5 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Nxc6 bxc6 9.Bd2 Bxc3 10.bxc3 0–0 11.Be2 Qf6 12.Qc1 Qg6 13.0–0 Bh3 14.Bf3 Rad8 15.c4 Nb6 16.Kh1 Bf5 17.c5 Nd5 18.Bc3 Nxc3 19.Qxc3 Be4 20.Bxe4 Qxe4 21.Rad1 Qa4 22.Rxd8 Rxd8 23.Qe5 Qxa2 24.Qxc7 Qd5 25.Qxa7 Re8 26.h3 h6 27.Kg1 Re5 28.Qb8+ Kh7 29.Qb1+ g6 30.Rc1 Rg5 31.e4 Qd4 32.Qc2 Re5 33.Qc4 Qd7 34.Re1 Qe7 35.Qd4 Qxc5 36.Qxc5 Rxc5 37.f4 Kg7 38.Kf2 Kf6 39.Rd1 Ke7 40.Kf3 Rc2 41.Ra1 Ke6 42.Ra8 h5 43.Re8+ Kd7 44.Rh8 Rc3+ 45.Kf2 Rc2+ 46.Kg3 Re2 47.e5 Re3+ 48.Kh4 Re2 49.g3 c5 50.Rf8 Ke7 51.Rc8 Rc2 52.g4 hxg4 53.hxg4 Rc3 54.Kg5 Rc4 55.f5 gxf5 56.gxf5 Rc1 57.Rc7+ Ke8 58.Kf6 c4 59.Rxf7 c3 60.Rc7 c2 61.Ke6 Kd8 62.Rc3 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 490 from The Divan News, August 1945.

() Fine – Korda, S

Blindfold rapid simultaneous Washington D.C., 27.06.1945
Catalan Opening [E01]

1.d4 Nf6 2.g3 e6 3.Bg2 d5 4.c4 Bb4+ 5.Bd2 Bxd2+ 6.Nxd2 0–0 7.Ngf3 Nc6 8.Qc2 Ne7 9.e4 dxe4 10.Nxe4 Nxe4 11.Qxe4 c6 12.h4 f5 13.Qe2 Ng6 14.0–0 Qf6 15.Rae1 Re8 16.h5 Nf8 17.Ne5 c5 18.dxc5 Rb8 19.Rd1 h6 20.f4 Qe7 21.Rd6 b6 22.Nc6 Qc7 23.Nxb8 Qxc5+ 24.Kh1 Qxd6 25.Nc6 Bb7 26.Ne5 Bxg2+ 27.Kxg2 Qc7 28.Rd1 Rd8 29.b4 Rxd1 30.Qxd1 Qb7+ 31.Qf3 Qe7 32.a3 Kh7 33.Qc6 Kg8 34.c5 bxc5 35.bxc5 Kh7 36.Qd6 Qb7+ 37.c6 Qc8 38.c7 Qb7+ 39.Kf2 Qb2+ 40.Kf3 Qb7+ 41.Ke3 Qe4+ 42.Kd2 Qg2+ 43.Kc1 Qg1+ 44.Kb2 Qf2+ 45.Kc3 Qxg3+ 46.Nd3 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 489 from The Divan News, August 1945.

() Fine – Pilnik, Herman

Rapid Washington D.C., 13.09.1945
Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D29]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Bxc4 a6 6.0–0 c5 7.Qe2 b5 8.Bb3 Bb7 9.a4 Nbd7 10.Rd1 Be7 11.Bc2 Qb6 12.e4 cxd4 13.Nxd4 0–0 14.Nc3 Bc5 15.Be3 Rad8 16.axb5 axb5 17.Ndxb5 Bxe3 18.Qxe3 Qxe3 19.fxe3 Nc5 20.Nd6 Bc6 21.b4 Nb7 22.b5 Nxd6 23.bxc6 Nc4 24.Rxd8 Rxd8 25.c7 Rc8 26.Nb5 Ne8 27.Rd1 Kf8 28.Rd8 Nb6 29.Nd6 Ke7 30.Nxc8+ Nxc8 31.Rxc8 1–0 Ansel Quarterly for Chess History 16, 498 from The Divan News October 1945

() Fine – Pilnik, Herman

Match New York, 08.1949
Queen’s Gambit Declined [D35]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Nbd7 5.Bg5 Be7 6.cxd5 exd5 7.e3 c6 8.Bd3 Nh5 9.h4 h6 10.Bxe7 Qxe7 11.Nd2 Nf4 12.Bf1 Nf6 13.Qc2 g6 14.0–0–0 Bf5 15.Qb3 Ne6 16.f3 h5 17.Na4 0–0–0 18.Be2? (Black has the better position but this oversight costs White a pawn.) 18…Nxd4 19.exd4 Qxe2 20.Qa3 Qd3 (This move is alright but …Qxg2 or …Rhe8 was stronger.) 21.Qxd3 Bxd3 22.Rde1 b6 23.Nf1 Rhe8 24.Ng3 Kd7 25.Kd2 Ba6 26.b3 Rxe1 27.Rxe1 Re8 28.Rc1 Kd6 29.a3 Nd7 30.b4 f5 31.Nc3 Bc4 32.Nge2 Bxe2 33.Nxe2 c5 34.bxc5+ bxc5 35.Nf4 cxd4 36.Kd3 (A mistake that White has to “take back.” 36 Nxg6 would have given White a better chance to draw.) 36…Nc5+ 37.Kc2 (Of course, if Kxd4 Nb3+ forks White’s king and rook.) 37…Re3 38.Rd1 Rc3+ 39.Kb2 Na4+ 40.Ka2 Rc4 (…Rxf3 was probably preferable.) 41.Rd2 Nc3+ 42.Kb2 Nb5 43.Nxg6 Ra4 44.Rd3 Kc5 45.Ne5 Nd6 46.Nd7+ (White misses his last drawing chance with Kb3.) 46…Kc6 47.Nf6 Nc4+ 48.Ka2 Ne5 49.Rd2 d3 (Not only advancing this dangerous pawn but also attacking White’s pawn on h4.) 50.g3 f4 51.Nxh5 fxg3 52.Nxg3 Rxh4 53.Nf5 Rf4 54.Ne7+ Kc5 55.Kb3 Rxf3 56.Ka4 Nc4 (After White’s rook moves along the second rank, …d2 is decisive, leading to a quick mate.) 0–1 From a scoresheet in the possession of Richard Cantwell. Hearst and Knott 2009, 345-6.

() Fine – Pilnik, Herman

Match New York, 08.1949
Queen’s Gambit Accepted [D28]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Bxc4 a6 6.0–0 c5 7.Qe2 Nc6 8.Rd1 b5 9.Bb3 c4 10.Bc2 Nb4 11.e4 Nxc2 12.Qxc2 Bb7 13.d5 exd5 14.Nc3 Be7 15.a4 (In his previous writings Fine himself had recommended 15 e5 here. We cannot be sure why he avoided that move when given the opportunity. EH & JK) 15…b4 16.Nxd5 Nxd5 17.exd5 Bxd5? (Unquestionably a losing move. 17…Qc7 or …Qd6 would leave Black with a fair game. EH&JK) 18.Qf5 Be6 19.Rxd8+ Rxd8 20.Qc2 Bf5 (Both players are grandmasters and if the game were not being played a 10–seconds-a-move and Fine were not blindfolded, Pilnik would have resigned here. EH&JK) 21.Qe2 Bd3 22.Qe1 0–0? 23.Bd2? (Fine did not “see” 23 Qxe7, after which Pilnik would almost be forced to resign. EH&JK) 23…c3 24.Qxe7 cxb2 25.Rd1 Bc2 26.Rf1 a5 27.Qe5 b1Q 28.Rxb1 Bxb1 29.h3 Rfe8 30.Qxa5 b3 31.Bc3 Bg6 32.Bb2 Rb8 33.Nd4 h6 34.h4 h5 35.Qc3 Rec8? (Another blunder. Black is lost anyway but 35…f6 would have held out longer. EH&JK) 36.Nc6 Rxc6 37.Qxg7# 1–0 From a scoresheet in the possession of Richard Cantwell. Hearst and Knott 2009, 345.

() Pilnik, Herman – Fine

Match New York, 08.1949
Dutch Defence [A90]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.c4 Ne4 4.Qc2 f5 5.g3 d5 6.Bg2 c6 7.0–0 Bd6 8.Nc3 0–0 9.Ne5 Bxe5 10.dxe5 Nd7 11.Nxe4 fxe4 12.Qc3 Qc7 13.Bf4 Qd8 14.h4 Qe7 15.Rad1 Nb6 16.b3 Bd7 17.Be3 Rf7 18.Qa5 Qd8 19.c5 d4 20.cxb6 dxe3 21.fxe3 Rxf1+ 22.Bxf1 Kf7 23.Bg2 Ke8 24.Bxe4 Qxb6 25.Qd2 Rd8 26.Bxh7 Bc8 27.Bg6+ Ke7 28.Qxd8+ Qxd8 29.Rxd8 Kxd8 30.Kf2 c5 31.Kf3 b5 32.Kf4 Bb7 33.g4 a5 34.Bd3 Bc6 35.Kg5 Ke7 36.h5 a4 37.h6 gxh6+ 38.Kxh6 axb3 39.axb3 Bd5 40.Bc2 b4 41.g5 c4 42.bxc4 Bxc4 43.g6 b3 44.Bxb3 Bxb3 45.g7 Kf7 46.Kh7 Bc2+ 47.Kh8 1–0 From a scoresheet in the possession of Richard Cantwell. Hearst and Knott 2009, 346.

() Pilnik, Herman – Fine

Match New York, 08.1949
English Opening A34

1.c4 c5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.d4 cxd4 6.Qxd4 Nxc3 7.Qxc3 Nc6 8.e4 e6 9.a3 Be7 10.Bf4 0–0 11.Be2 Qb6 12.Be3 Qc7 13.0–0 Bd7 14.Rac1 Rac8 15.b4 Qb8 16.Qb2 Bf6 17.Qb3 e5 18.Rfd1 Be6 19.Bc4 Bg4 20.Bc5 Bxf3 21.Qxf3 Nd4 22.Qg4 Rfd8 23.Bd5 b6 24.Bxd4 (24… Bd6! would have been a neat move, leading to a winning position for White. But that kind of move is naturally very difficult hard to see and risk when one is playing chess at ten seconds per move.) 24…exd4 25.f4 Rxc1 (25… Rc3 was a good alternative.) 26.Rxc1 Qd6 27.Rc6 Qe7 28.Qf3 (White has a spatial advantage and is trying to win Black’s d-pawn.) 28…g6 29.e5 Bg7 30.Qe4 Qd7 31.Rd6 Qe7 32.Rxd8+ Qxd8 33.Qxd4 Qc7 34.g3 Kf8 35.Qd2 f6 (Black seeks counterplay by giving scope to his bishop, at the cost of allowing White a well-protected passed pawn.) 36.e6 f5 37.b5 Qc5+ 38.Kg2 Ke7 (38… Qxb5 or even 38… Qxa3 should draw easily (39… Qb2 could follow in some variations). But one has the feeling Black is still trying to win.) 39.a4 Bd4 40.Bf3 Kxe6 41.h4 h5 42.Qa2+ Kd6?! (Now Black will lose his pawns on the kingside but he hopes to win White’s pawns on the queenside and use his king to aid the advance of his own queenside pawns.) 43.Qf7 Qc2+ 44.Kh3 Qf2 45.Qxg6+ Kc5 46.Qxf5+ Kb4 47.Qxh5 Kxa4 48.Bg2 Bc5 49.Qe8 Qc2 50.Qe6 Kxb5 51.h5 a5 52.h6 a4 53.Be4 Qb2 54.h7 Bd4 55.Bd3+ Kb4 56.f5 a3 57.Qc4+ Ka5 58.Qa6+ Kb4 59.Qc4+ (59. f6! would lead to a clear win here. After the reply …Bxf6 there would follow 60 Qxb6+ Ka4 61 Qc6+ Kb4 62 Qc4+ Ka5 63 Qc5+ Ka4 64 Bc2+. But who can analyze all this in rapid chess? The whole game becomes a comedy of errors from now on. White has another chance to play this winning variation on his 60th move and overlooks it again.) 59…Ka5 60.Qd5+ b5 61.g4 a2 62.Bxb5?? (Either Qa8+ or Qd8+ would still draw. Now White is lost, but…) 62…a1Q 63.Bd3+ Ka4 (63…Kb6 would win easily.) 64.g5 Qe1? (here …Qf2 would win.) 65.Qc4+ (Instead, Qc6+ would lead to a draw by perpetual check. Now Black can win by playing 65… Qeb4. However, Fine forfeited the game at this point, presumably because he did not move immediately at the end of ten seconds. An amazing back and forth game, with an entirely unexpected finish.) 1–0 From a scoresheet in the possession of Richard Cantwell. Hearst and Knott 2009, 346.

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Newly Published: Longfellow in Love

New on our bookshelf today:

Longfellow in Love: Passion and Tragedy in the Life of the Poet
Edward M. Cifelli

After four years travelling through Europe and a yearlong romance with Giulia Persiani in Rome, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow came back home in 1829 and fell in love again, this time with Mary Storer Potter, whom he married in 1831. They travelled together to England and Scandinavia in 1834 but their happiness was cut short when she died in 1835.

In 1836, traveling in Switzerland, he met the woman who would become the grand passion of his life, 18-year old Fanny Appleton of Boston. But she, a wealthy textile heiress, was not interested in settling down with a Harvard professor. She rebuffed his advances for six years—then suddenly changed her mind and married him on July 13, 1843. For the next 18 years they were “America’s couple,” and Longfellow became America’s poet—and then tragedy struck once again.

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Newly Published: The Magnificent Max Baer

New on our bookshelf today:

The Magnificent Max Baer: The Life of the Heavyweight Champion and Film Star
Colleen Aycock with David W. Wallace

Boxing might not have survived the 1930s if not for Max Baer. A contender for every heavyweight championship 1932–1941, California’s “Glamour Boy” brought back the “million-dollar gate” not seen since the 1920s. His radio voice sold millions of Gillette razor blades; his leading-man appeal made him a heartthrob in The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933). The film was banned in Nazi Germany—Baer had worn a Star of David on his trunks when he TKOed German former champ Max Schmeling.

Baer defeated 275-pound Primo Carnera in 1934 for the championship, losing it to Jim Braddock the next year. Contrary to Cinderella Man, (2005), Baer—favored 10 to 1—was not a villain and the fight was more controversial than the film suggested. His battle with Joe Louis three months later drew the highest gate of the decade.

This first comprehensive biography covers Baer’s complete ring record, his early life, his career on radio, film, stage and television, and his World War II army service.

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Newly Published: The Image of Disability

New on our bookshelf today:

The Image of Disability: Essays on Media Representations
Edited by JL Schatz and Amber E. George

A mainstay of modern life, the global media gives out information about disabilities that is often inaccurate or negative and perpetuates oppressive stigmas and discrimination.

In response to representations that have been incomplete, misguided or unimaginative, this collection of new essays encourages scholars and allies to refashion media so as to disrupt the status quo and move toward more liberatory politics. Images in film, television and social media are assessed through the lenses of disabilities studies, media studies, cultural studies and intersectional studies involving critical race theory and gender.

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Newly Published: A Hurdler’s Hurdler

New on our bookshelf today:

A Hurdler’s Hurdler: The Life of Rodney Milburn, Olympic Champion
Steven McGill

In September 1972, Rodney Milburn of Opelousas, Louisiana, won the Olympic gold medal in the men’s 110-meter high hurdles. Raised amid segregation and poverty in the 1950s and 60s, Milburn honed his skills on a grass track over wooden hurdles. In a career that spanned more than a decade, he established himself as the greatest hurdler of his era and one of the greatest athletes in track history.

This biography chronicles Milburn’s rise from poverty to international athletic stardom. Loved ones, as well as track legends Renaldo Nehemiah, Dwight Stones, Tonie Campbell, Brian Oldfield and Bill Collins, relate Milburn’s remarkable achievements and humble nature.

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Newly Published: Humorists vs. Religion

New on our bookshelf today:

Humorists vs. Religion: Critical Voices from Mark Twain to Neil DeGrasse Tyson
Iain Ellis

Critical humorists and religion are steeped in a long-standing cultural antagonism. This book recounts the dramatic skirmishes between religion—its dogma and edicts, political manifestations, and the nature of faith—and the satire, parody, jokes and hyperbole of popular wits. The writings of Twain, Vonnegut, Mencken and Hitchens are included, along with the films of Monty Python, the cartoons of Charlie Hebdo, the animated television series The Simpsons and South Park, the comedy of George Carlin and Bill Maher, the music of Randy Newman and Pussy Riot, the performance monologue of Julia Sweeney and the magic of Penn Jillette.

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Newly Published: A Dune Companion

New on our bookshelf today:

A Dune Companion: Characters, Places and Terms in Frank Herbert’s Original Six Novels
Donald E. Palumbo

This companion to Frank Herbert’s six original Dune novels—DuneDune MessiahChildren of DuneGod Emperor of DuneHeretics of Dune and Chapterhouse: Dune—provides an encyclopedia of characters, locations, terms and other elements, and highlights the series’ underrated aesthetic integrity. An extensive introduction discusses the theme of ecology, chaos theory concepts and structures, and Joseph Campbell’s monomyth in Herbert’s narratives.

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Newly Published: Gary Paulsen

New on our bookshelf today:

Gary Paulsen: A Companion to the Young Adult Literature
Mary Ellen Snodgrass

McFarland Companions to Young Adult Literature American novelist Gary Paulsen is best known for his young adult fiction, including bestsellers NightjohnSoldier’s Heart, and Woods Runner. From his trenchant prose in The Rifle and The Foxman to the witty escapades of Harris and Me and Zero to Sixty, Paulsen crafts stories with impressive range. The tender scenes in The Quilt and A Christmas Sonataspeak to his empathy for children, with characters who endure the same hardships that marred his own early life.

This literary companion introduces readers to his life and work. A-to-Z entries explore themes such as alcoholism, coming of age, slavery, survival, and war. A glossary defines terms unique to his work. Appendices provide related historical references, writing, art, and research topics.

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Newly Published: The Automobile and American Life, 2d ed.

New on our bookshelf today:

The Automobile and American Life, 2d ed.
John Heitmann

Now revised and updated, this book tells the story of how the automobile transformed American life and how automotive design and technology have changed over time. It details cars’ inception as a mechanical curiosity and later a plaything for the wealthy; racing and the promotion of the industry; Henry Ford and the advent of mass production; market competition during the 1920s; the development of roads and accompanying highway culture; the effects of the Great Depression and World War II; the automotive Golden Age of the 1950s; oil crises and the turbulent 1970s; the decline and then resurgence of the Big Three; and how American car culture has been represented in film, music and literature. Updated notes and a select bibliography serve as valuable resources to those interested in automotive history.

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Newly Published: The Metaphysical Mysteries of G.K. Chesterton

New on our bookshelf today:

The Metaphysical Mysteries of G.K. Chesterton: A Critical Study of the Father Brown Stories and Other Detective Fiction
Laird R. Blackwell

G.K. Chesterton’s Father Brown stories are widely considered to be some of the finest detective short stories ever published, offering vivid writing, brilliant puzzles, biting social criticism, and metaphysical explorations of life’s great questions. This book presents the first in-depth analysis of his works both as classics of the detective genre and as meaningful philosophical inquiries. The Father Brown stories are examined along with Chesterton’s less well known fiction, including the short stories about Mr. Pond, Gabriel Gale, Basil and Rupert Grant, Horne Fisher, Dr. Adrian Hyde and Philip Swayne, and the novels The Man Who Was Thursday and Manalive.

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Four New Titles Reviewed in August Issue of Choice

Four new titles are reviewed in the August issue of Choice!

The Mistaken History of the Korean War: What We Got Wrong Then and Now
“Few can challenge [Edwards’] passion in defense of the men he represents. Anyone wanting to comprehend the meaning of the Korean War for Americans cannot go wrong with this book. Essential.”

Motor City Champs: Mickey Cochrane and the 1934–1935 Detroit Tigers
“This book serves as an excellent introduction to the business and financial aspects of professional baseball teams in the 1930s…an engaging and informative read…recommended.”

Protecting the Home Front: Women in Civil Defense in the Early Cold War
“Recommended.”

The Californios: A History, 1769–1890
“Recommended.”

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Newly Published: Teaching Huckleberry Finn

New on our bookshelf today:

Teaching Huckleberry Finn: Why and How to Present the Controversial Classic in the High School Classroom
John Nogowski

Nearly all of the Gadsden County’s student body is black and considered economically disadvantaged, the highest percentage of any school district in Florida. Fewer than 15 percent perform at grade level.

An idealistic new teacher at East Gadsden High, John Nogowski saw that the Department of Education’s techniques would not work in this environment. He wanted to make an impact in his students’ lives. In a room stacked with battered classics like A Raisin in the Sun and To Kill a Mockingbird, he found 30 pristine, “quarantined” copies of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Abused by an alcoholic father, neglected by his own community, consigned to a life of privation and danger. Wouldn’t Huck strike a chord with these kids? Were he alive today, wouldn’t he be one of them? Part lesson plan, part memoir, Nogowski’s surprising narrative details his experience teaching Twain’s politically charged satire of American racism and hypocrisy to poor black teens.

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Newly Published: The Ku Klux Klan’s Campaign Against Hispanics, 1921–1925

New on our bookshelf today:

The Ku Klux Klan’s Campaign Against Hispanics, 1921–1925: Rhetoric, Violence and Response in the American Southwest
Juan O. Sánchez

The Ku Klux Klan’s persecution of Hispanics during the early 1920s was just as brutal as their terrorizing of the black community—a fact sparsely documented in historical texts. The KKK viewed Mexicans as subhuman foreigners supporting a Catholic conspiracy to subvert U.S. institutions and install the pope as leader of the nation, and mounted a campaign of intimidation and violence against them. Drawing on numerous Spanish-language newspapers and Klan publications of the day, the author describes the KKK’s extensive anti–Hispanic activity in the southwest.

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Newly Published: The Lives of Justine Johnstone

New on our bookshelf today:

The Lives of Justine Johnstone: Follies Star, Research Scientist, Social Activist
Kathleen Vestuto

As a Ziegfeld Follies girl and film actress, Justine Johnstone (1895–1982) was celebrated as “the most beautiful woman in the world.” Her career took an unexpected turn when she abruptly retired from acting at 31. For the remainder of her life, she dedicated herself to medical research and social activism. As a cutting-edge pathologist, she contributed to the pre-penicillin treatment of syphilis at Columbia University, participated in the development of early cancer treatments at Caltech, and assisted Los Angeles physicians in oncology research. As a divorced woman in the 1940s, she adopted and raised two children on her own. She later helped find work for blacklisted Hollywood screenwriters and became a prominent participant in social and political causes.

The first full-length biography of Johnstone chronicles her extraordinary success in two male-dominated fields—show business and medical science—and follows her remarkable journey into a fascinating and fulfilling life.

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Newly Published: The Spectacle of Twins in American Literature and Popular Culture

New on our bookshelf today:

The Spectacle of Twins in American Literature and Popular Culture
Karen Dillon

The cultural fantasy of twins imagines them as physically and behaviorally identical. Media portrayals consistently offer the spectacle of twins who share an insular closeness and perform a supposed alikeness—standing side by side, speaking and acting in unison.

Treating twinship as a cultural phenomenon, this first comprehensive study of twins in American literature and popular culture examines the historical narrative—within the discourses of experimentation, aberrance and eugenics—and how it has shaped their representations in the 20th and 21st centuries.

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Games & Hobbies Summer Sale Starts Now!

The best four days in gaming, Gen Con 2018, starts this week in Indianapolis. McFarland will be in the exhibit hall at booth #142. Visit us to peruse our books and to get the buzz about McFarland’s latest offerings. (Also, Lisa Camp will be in the booth representing the editorial team, and welcomes proposals for nonfiction manuscripts.)

For those of us that can’t make it to Gen Con, McFarland’s Games & Hobbies catalog covers books about role-playing games, tabletop games, video games, chess, and more. When you order direct from our website using the coupon code GAME25, print editions of all games & hobbies books are 25% off August 1 through August 15. Happy reading!

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Newly Published: “An Arch Rebel Like Myself”

New on our bookshelf today:

“An Arch Rebel Like Myself”: Dan Showalter and the Civil War in California and Texas
Gene C. Armistead and Robert D. Arconti

Dan Showalter was Speaker Pro Tem of the California State Assembly at the outbreak of the Civil War and the exemplar of treason in the Far West among the pro–Union press. He gained notoriety as the survivor of California’s last political (and actual, fatal) duel, for his role in the display of a Confederate flag in Sacramento, and for his imprisonment after an armed confrontation with Union troops.

Escaping to Texas, he distinguished himself in the Confederate service in naval battles and in pursuit of Comanche raiders. As commander of the 4th Arizona Cavalry, he helped recapture the Rio Grande Valley from the Union and defended Brownsville against a combined Union and Mexican force. Refusing to surrender at war’s end, he fled to Mexico, where he died of a wound sustained in a drunken bar fight at age 35.

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Newly Published: Baseball in a Grain of Sand

New on our bookshelf today:

Baseball in a Grain of Sand: Seeing the Game through a Small Town Season
Bill Gruber

Part sports journalism, part history, part memoir, this many-sided narrative follows one season with the Blue Devils of Moscow, Idaho—a rural American Legion baseball team. Showcasing baseball’s enduring place in American life, the author draws on the lore of the game, and conversations with diverse fans and players—an outdoorsman juggling his son’s schedule of games with bear hunting; a bewildered German college student, holding a baseball for the first time; former St. Louis Cardinal pitcher & Yale baseball coach John Stuper; the proud owner of a Derek Jeter jersey in Hokendauqua, Pennsylvania, to name a few.

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Newly Published: Bond, the Beatles and My Year with Marilyn

New on our bookshelf today:

Bond, the Beatles and My Year with Marilyn: 50 Years as a Movie Marketing Man
Charles “Jerry” Juroe

In his remarkable 50-year career, D-Day veteran, international film publicist and executive and production associate Charles “Jerry” Juroe met, knew or worked with almost “anyone who was anyone,” from Cecil B. DeMille and Alfred Hitchcock to Mary Pickford, Marilyn Monroe, Bob Hope, Katherine Hepburn, Brando and the Beatles.

He made his name working on the iconic James Bond films, running publicity and advertising for both United Artists and legendary producers Albert “Cubby” Broccoli and Harry Saltzman’s EON Productions. From Dr. No to GoldenEye, Juroe traveled the globe with Sean Connery, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan. His entertaining memoir reads like insider history of Hollywood.

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Newly Published: Virginia in the War of 1812

New on our bookshelf today:

Virginia in the War of 1812
Christopher M. Bonin

Virginia saw significant action during the War of 1812, from the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair to the defense of Norfolk against British invaders. Many Virginians supported the struggle for independence from Great Britain—others vehemently opposed “Mr. Madison’s War.”

A largely forgotten conflict, the war played an important role in the history of the United States. While comprehensive histories of the war are few, there is a positive lack of state-focused studies. Drawing on extensive primary and secondary sources, the author provides an in-depth portrait of the “Old Dominion” at war in the early years of the nation’s history.

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Newly Published: Violence and Victimhood in Hispanic Crime Fiction

New on our bookshelf today:

Violence and Victimhood in Hispanic Crime Fiction: Essays on Contemporary Works
Edited by Shalisa M. Collins, Renée W. Craig-Odders and Marcella L. Paul

At the heart of crime fiction is an investigation into an act of violence. Studies of the genre have generally centered on the relationship between the criminal and the investigator. Focusing on contemporary crime fiction from the Spanish-speaking world, this collection of new essays explores the role of the victim.

Contributors discuss how the definition of “victim,” the nature of the crime, the identification of the body and its treatment by authorities reflect shifting social landscapes, changing demographics, economic crises and political corruption and instability.

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Newly Published: The Visual Culture of Women’s Activism in London, Paris and Beyond

New on our bookshelf today:

The Visual Culture of Women’s Activism in London, Paris and Beyond: An Analytical Art History, 1860 to the Present
Colleen Denney

Women’s bodies and their portrayals in the media remain at the center of every debate on women’s rights worldwide. This study examines the domains of public and private space—and the interstices between them—with a focus on how women advance in the public arena, drawing on the domestic politics of the private realm in their drive for social justice and equality. The author examines the visual culture of first-wave feminists in Edwardian England and feminist developments in France. Late 20th century and 21st century women’s movements are discussed in the context of how they continue to honor first-wave suffrage history.

 

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Newly Published: Bracali and the Revolution in Tuscan Cuisine

New on our bookshelf today:

Bracali and the Revolution in Tuscan Cuisine
Roberto Curti

A self-taught culinary virtuoso, Francesco Bracali is one of Italy’s top chefs. He and his brother, Luca, a sommelier, own the two-Michelin-stars restaurant Bracali in Massa Marittima, Tuscany. Once an unpretentious tavern run by their parents, the brothers turned it into a fine dining place where they revisited the region’s rich gastronomic traditions in an innovative way.

Their revolutionary approach—a novelty at first—today boasts international recognition. This book examines Tuscany’s culinary history and analyzes the Bracali brothers’ interpretation of traditional dishes and fine wine.

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July Transportation Sale: Get 25% off ALL Transportation Titles

Some of you may share a guilty failing of our editors.  When they receive proposals and manuscripts, while reading about almost any car–learning how it took shape, its quirks and qualities, how it changed over the production run–desire starts to sprout.  Previously ignored vehicles (and even disliked vehicles) show their hidden appeal.  On more than one occasion, an editor has looked at ads and undertaken calculations (financial, emotional, marital) for said cars.
 
If you’re the same, peruse our transportation catalog with caution!  In addition to a broad range of books about automobiles, you’ll find offerings about aircraft, locomotives, bicycles, ships, military vehicles and transportation-related topics.  When you order direct from our website using the coupon code TRANSPORT25, print editions of all transportation books are 25% off July 16 through July 31. Happy motoring and happy reading!
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Newly Published: Baseball Rowdies of the 19th Century

New on our bookshelf today:

Baseball Rowdies of the 19th Century: Brawlers, Drinkers, Pranksters and Cheats in the Early Days of the Major Leagues
Eddie Mitchell

During the 19th century, baseball was a game with few rules, many rowdy players and just one umpire. Dirty tricks were simply part of a winning strategy—spiking, body-blocking, cutting bases short or hiding an extra ball to be used when needed were all OK. Deliberately failing to catch a fly in order to have the game called due to darkness was also acceptable. And drinking before a game was perhaps expected. Providing brief bios of dozens of players, managers, umpires and owners, this book chronicles some of the flamboyant, unruly and occasionally criminal behavior of baseball’s early years.

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Author Stephen Knight Receives George N. Dove Award

Congratulations to author Stephen Knight, the 2018 recipient of the George N. Dove Award! Presented annually by the Mystery Area of the Popular Culture Association, the Dove Award recognizes an outstanding scholar in mystery and crime fiction research.

Knight is the author of four McFarland books: The Mysteries of the CitiesSecrets of Crime Fiction ClassicsTowards Sherlock Holmes, and Australian Crime Fiction.

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Newly Published: In Search of Elena Ferrante

New on our bookshelf today:

In Search of Elena Ferrante: The Novels and the Question of Authorship
Karen Bojar

Elena Ferrante—named one of the 100 most influential people in 2016 by Time magazine—is best known for her Neapolitan novels, which explore such themes as the complexity of female friendship; the joys and constraints of motherhood; the impact of changing gender roles; the pervasiveness of male violence; the struggle for upward mobility; and the impact of the feminist movement. Ferrante’s three novellas encompass similar themes, focusing on moments of extreme tension in women’s lives.

This study analyzes the integration of political themes and feminist theory in Ferrante’s works, including men’s entrapment in a sexist script written for them from time immemorial. Her decision to write under a pseudonym is examined, along with speculation that Rome-based translator Anita Raja and her husband Domenico Starnone are coauthors of Ferrante’s books.

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Newly Published: Dharma of the Dead

New on our bookshelf today:

Dharma of the Dead: Zombies, Mortality and Buddhist Philosophy
Christopher M. Moreman

With the increased popularity of zombies in recent years, scholars have considered why the undead have so captured the public imagination. This book argues that the zombie can be viewed as an object of meditation on death, a memento mori that makes the fact of mortality more approachable from what has been described as America’s “death-denying culture.” The existential crisis in zombie apocalyptic fiction brings to the fore the problem of humanity’s search for meaning in an increasingly global and secular world. Zombies are analyzed in the context of Buddhist thought, in contrast with social and religious critiques from other works.

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Newly Published: Base Ball 10

New on our bookshelf today:

Base Ball 10: New Research on the Early Game
Edited by Don Jensen

Offering the best in original research and analysis, Base Ball is an annually published book series that promotes the study of baseball’s early history, from its protoball roots to 1920, and its rise to prominence within American popular culture.

This volume, number 10, brings together 14 articles on a wide range of topics, including the role of physicians in spreading early baseball; the game’s financial revolution of 1866, when teams began charging a 25-cent admission price; the prejudice that greeted Japan’s Waseda University team during its American tour in 1905; the Addie Joss benefit game and its place in baseball lore; the 1867 western tour of the National Base Ball Club; and entrenched ideas about class and early baseball, with a focus on the supposedly blue-collar Pennsylvania Base Ball Club.

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Newly Published: Urban Artscapes

New on our bookshelf today:

Urban Artscapes: Essays on Political and Cultural Contexts
Edited by Manila Castoro and Carolina Vasilikou

In recent years, artists, architects, activists and curators, as well as corporations and local governments have addressed the urban space. They challenge its use and destination, and dispute current notions of space, legality, trade and artistry. Emerging art practices challenge old ideas about where art belongs, what forms it can take and what political discourses it fosters.

Selected from papers presented at the 2013 Artscapes conference in Canterbury, this collection of new essays explores the dynamic relationship between art and the city. Contributors discuss the everyday artistic use of public space around the world, from sculpture to graffiti to street photography.

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Newly Published: Edith Wharton and Mary Roberts Rinehart at the Western Front, 1915

New on our bookshelf today:

Edith Wharton and Mary Roberts Rinehart at the Western Front, 1915
Ed Klekowski and Libby Klekowski

By 1915, the Western Front was a 450–mile line of trenches, barbed wire and concrete bunkers, stretching across Europe. Attempts to break the stalemate were murderous and futile. Censorship of the press was extreme—no one wanted the carnage reported.

Remakably, the Allied command gave two intrepid American women, Edith Wharton and Mary Roberts Rinehart, permission to visit the front and report on what they saw. Their travels are reconstructed from their own published accounts, Rinehart’s unpublished day-by-day notes, and the writings of other journalists who toured the front in 1915. The present authors’ explorations of the places Wharton and Rinehart visited serves as a travel guide to the Western Front.

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Newly Published: Something Magic

New on our bookshelf today:

Something Magic: The Baltimore Orioles, 1979–1983
Charles Kupfer

“Orioles Magic” is a phrase fans still associate with the 1979–1983 seasons, Baltimore’s last championship era, when they played excellent, exciting ball with a penchant for late-inning heroics. This book analyzes the Orioles not just as a great team but as the team to be marked by the fabled “Oriole Way,” an organizational commitment to fundamentally sound baseball that guided them for nearly 30 years.

The Magic years are discussed in the context of Baltimore sports, fan culture and baseball history, recalling the thrills of a splendid squad that delighted fans and reminding us why Peter Gammons called the 1979–1983 Orioles one of the major league’s “last fun teams.”

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Four New Titles Reviewed in Choice

Four new titles are reviewed in the July issue of Choice!

Scenes from an Automotive Wonderland: Remarkable Cars Spotted in Postwar Europe
“Any car spotter will enjoy this book, and may find a 26 horsepower favorite. The book is presented in a pleasant, easily readable format and contains a useful index and excellent bibliography… recommended.”

Women in the American Revolution
“effective… enriches the breadth of scholarship published on this topic… Wike’s multicultural net captures the multifaceted roles of women… recommended.”

The First 50 Super Bowls: How Football’s Championships Were Won
“This readable book will no doubt be enjoyed by his intended audience of football and sports fans… recommended.”

Henry Green: Havoc in the House of Fiction
“Nuanced… one leaves this study with a thorough knowledge of Green’s oeuvre and full insight into his mastery of high modernism… recommended.”

 

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Newly Published: The 31st Infantry Regiment

New on our bookshelf today:

The 31st Infantry Regiment: A History of “America’s Foreign Legion” in Peace and War
By the Members of the 31st Infantry Regiment Association

Formed in 1916, the U.S. Army 31st Infantry Regiment—known as the Polar Bears—has fought in virtually every war in modern American history. This richly illustrated chronicle of the regiment’s century of combat service covers their exploits on battlefields from Manila to Siberia—including Pork Chop Hill, Nui Chom Mountain and Iraq’s Triangle of Death—along with their survival during the Bataan Death March and the years of brutal captivity that followed.

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Weekly Deal: Martial Arts

This week, get 20% off all books about martial arts with the coupon code MARTIAL!

Now with Kung Fu Grip!: How Bodybuilders, Soldiers and a Hairdresser Reinvented Martial Arts for America

Mixed Martial Arts and the Quest for Legitimacy: The Sport vs. Spectacle Divide

Classic Movie Fight Scenes: 75 Years of Bare Knuckle Brawls, 1914–1989

Game of Thrones and the Medieval Art of War

The American Martial Arts Film

The Hong Kong Filmography, 1977–1997: A Reference Guide to 1,100 Films Produced by British Hong Kong Studios

Sword Fighting in the Star Wars Universe: Historical Origins, Style and Philosophy

The Asian Influence on Hollywood Action Films

 

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Newly Published: Jennifer Higdon

New on our bookshelf today:

Jennifer Higdon: Composing in Color
Christina L. Reitz

Renowned composer Jennifer Higdon is best known for her symphonic pieces blue cathedral, Concerto for Orchestra, City Scape, Concerto 4-3 and Violin Concerto (2010 Pulitzer Prize). These compositions illustrate her breadth of style and avant-garde technique. The author examines these works—with commentary by Higdon—as well as the music of her first opera, with a focus on compositional history, musical characteristics, formal analysis and critical reception.

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Newly Published: Text, Lies and Cataloging

New on our bookshelf today:

Text, Lies and Cataloging: Ethical Treatment of Deceptive Works in the Library
By Jana Brubaker

What do James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces, Margaret B. Jones’ Love and Consequence and Wanda Koolmatrie’s My Own Sweet Time have in common? None of these popular books are what they appear to be. Frey’s fraudulent drug addiction “memoir” was really a semi-fictional novel, Jones’ chronicle of her life in a street gang was a complete fabrication, and Koolmatrie was not an Aboriginal woman removed from her family as a child, as in her seemingly autobiographical account, but rather a white taxi driver named Leon Carmen.

Deceptive literary works mislead readers and present librarians with a dilemma. Whether making recommendations to patrons or creating catalog records, objectivity and accuracy are crucial—and can be difficult when a book’s authorship or veracity is in doubt.

This informative (and entertaining!) study addresses ethical considerations for deceptive works and proposes cataloging solutions that are provocative and designed to spark debate. An extensive annotated bibliography describes books that are not what they seem.

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Newly Published: Growing Up with Vampires

New on our bookshelf today:

Growing Up with Vampires: Essays on the Undead in Children’s Media
Edited by Simon Bacon and Katarzyna Bronk

Vampire narratives are generally thought of as adult or young adult fare, yet there is a long history of their appearance in books, film and other media meant for children. They emerge as expressions of anxiety about change and growing up but sometimes turn out to be new best friends who highlight the beauty of difference and individuality.

This collection of new essays examines the history of vampires in 20th and 21st century Western popular media marketed to preteens and explores their significance and symbolism.

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Newly Published: I Was Flesh Gordon

New on our bookshelf today:

I Was Flesh Gordon: Fighting the Sex Ray and Other Adventures of an Accidental Porn Pioneer
Jason Williams with Derek McCaw

Hollywood, the 1970s. Jason Williams, a former college athlete from very conservative Orange County, hopes to become a film actor in a town where everyone’s looking for a break. He jumps at the chance for the lead in a science fiction parody, an X-rated (later R) spoof of Flash Gordon.

Sure, he has to get naked on camera—but so do lots of cute girls. He has no idea the production will be the start of an odyssey that will take him through the highs and lows of Tinseltown, and make him the most known unknown in movies—Flesh Gordon!

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Newly Published: Deadwood and Shakespeare

New on our bookshelf today:

Deadwood and Shakespeare: The Henriad in the Old West
Susan Cosby Ronnenberg

Set in politically unstable environments, Shakespeare’s history plays—Richard II, 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV and Henry V—and HBO’s Western series Deadwood (2004–2006) all stand as critiques of myths of national origin, the sanitized stories we tell ourselves about how power imposes order on chaos. Drawing parallels between the Shakespeare plays and Deadwood, the author explores questions about legitimate political authority, the qualities of an effective leader, gender roles and community, and the reciprocal relationship between past and present in historical narratives.

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Newly Published: Richard Pryor in Hollywood

New on our bookshelf today:

Richard Pryor in Hollywood: The Narrative Films, 1967–1997
Anthony Balducci

Hollywood studios were once eager to bring stand-up comedy king Richard Pryor’s dynamic humor to the big screen—so much so that studio executives gave him full access to available resources and creative control to develop his own projects. Unfortunately Pryor’s screen talents were far less acclaimed than his stage ones, and flops such as The Toy and Superman III greatly diminished his reputation. The author examines how this downfall unfolded through comprehensive analyses of each of Pryor’s movies.

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Newly Published: Decent, Safe and Sanitary Dwellings

New on our bookshelf today:

Decent, Safe and Sanitary Dwellings: The National Conversation About Public Housing, 1932–1973
James P. Hubbard

In 1973, President Nixon halted new construction of public housing, claiming that the U.S. government had become “the biggest slumlord in history.” Four decades earlier, in the depths of the Great Depression, strong political support for federally-subsidized low-income housing had resulted in the Housing Act of 1937.

By the 1950s, growing criticism of the housing constructed by local authorities and prejudice against poor residents—particularly African Americans—fueled opposition to new projects. This book documents the lively and wide-ranging national debate over public housing from the New Deal to Nixon.

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Newly Published: I Am Legend as American Myth

New on our bookshelf today:

I Am Legend as American Myth: Race and Masculinity in the Novel and Its Film Adaptations
Amy J. Ransom

Richard Matheson’s 1954 novel I Am Legend has spawned a series of iconic horror and science fiction films, including The Last Man on Earth (1964), The Omega Man (1971) and I Am Legend (2007). The compelling narrative of the last man on earth, struggling to survive a pandemic that has transformed the rest of humanity into monsters, has become an American myth. While the core story remains intact, filmmakers have transformed the details over time, reflecting changing attitudes about race and masculinity.

This reexamination of Matheson’s novel situates the tale of one man’s conflicted attitude about killing racialized “others” within its original post–World War II context, engaging the question of post-traumatic stress disorder. The author analyzes the several film adaptations, with a focus on the casting and interpretations of protagonist Robert Neville.

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Newly Published: Informers in 20th Century Ireland

New on our bookshelf today:

Informers in 20th Century Ireland: The Costs of Betrayal
Angela Duffy

Informers have been active during many periods of unrest in Ireland but, until Tudor times, they had never been an organized phenomenon until the twentieth century. The decision (or refusal) to inform is dangerous—thus the motives of the informers are compelling, as is their ability to deceive themselves.

Drawing on firsthand and newspaper accounts of the Easter Rising and other events, this book provides a history of the gradual development of informing in Ireland. Each informer’s story details their life and secrets and the outcome of their actions. All of them have shared two experiences: the accusation of informing, whether true or false, and betrayal, whether committed or endured.

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Newly Published: Group Motion in Practice

New on our bookshelf today:

Group Motion in Practice: Collective Creation through Dance Movement Improvisation
Brigitta Herrmann and Manfred Fischbeck with Elia A. Sinaiko and Anna Beresin

Group Motion—an improvisational dance performance practice—represents fifty years of co-creation by the authors, with the participation of thousands of dancers, musicians, videographers and others around the globe. Informed by Mary Wigman’s expressionist dance and other contemporary dance and theater traditions, Group Motion has brought dance not only to stages worldwide, but also to public parks, prisons and airports.

Part memoir, part guidebook, part philosophy of art treatise, this book provides step-by-step guidance to dozens of improvisational structures or games for dance professionals, theater artists, musicians and other performers who use movement for creative expression.

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Newly Published: John McTiernan

Newly Published:

John McTiernan: The Rise and Fall of an Action Movie Icon
Larry Taylor

John McTiernan is one of the most influential action filmmakers of his generation. Educated
at the American Film Institute and influenced by European cinematic style, he made his name with a trio of groundbreaking action films—PredatorDie Hard and The Hunt for Red October.

His later output was a mixture of successes and failures, including Last Action Hero, one of the most colossal misfires in Hollywood history. His career and personal life unravelled when he was indicted and briefly imprisoned for involvement in a wiretapping scandal.

Drawing on extensive research, the author covers McTiernan’s tumultuous life and career, from his early triumphs through his extensive legal battles and his multiple attempts at a comeback.

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Newly Published: When Women Wrote Hollywood

New on our bookshelf today:

When Women Wrote Hollywood: Essays on Female Screenwriters in the Early Film Industry
Edited by Rosanne Welch

This collection of 23 new essays focuses on the lives of female screenwriters of Golden Age Hollywood, whose work helped create those unforgettable stories and characters beloved by audiences—but whose names have been left out of most film histories. The contributors trace the careers of such writers as Anita Loos, Adela Rogers St. Johns, Lillian Hellman, Gene Gauntier, Eve Unsell and Ida May Park, and explore themes of their writing in classics like Gentlemen Prefer BlondesBen Hur, and It’s a Wonderful Life.

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Newly Published: The Art of the English Trade Gun in North America

New on our bookshelf today:

The Art of the English Trade Gun in North America
Nathan E. Bender

Symbolic ornamentation inspired by ancient Greek and Roman art is a long-standing Western tradition. The author explores the designs of 18th century English gunsmiths who engraved classical ornamental patterns on firearms gifted or traded to American Indians. A system of allegory is found that symbolized the Americas of the New World in general, and that enshrined the American Indian peoples as “noble savages.”

The same allegorical context was drawn upon for symbols of national liberty in the early American republic. Inadvertently, many of the symbolic designs used on the trade guns strongly resonated with several Native American spiritual traditions.

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Newly Published: Apocalyptic Visions in 21st Century Films

New on our bookshelf today:

Apocalyptic Visions in 21st Century Films
Elizabeth A. Ford and Deborah C. Mitchell

The apocalypse on the big screen has expanded beyond the familiar end-of-the-world movies. Romantic comedies, teen adventures and even children’s films frequently feature apocalyptic imagery—disintegrating cities, extreme weather events, extinctions, rogue military forces, epidemics, zombie armies and worlds colliding. Using sophisticated CGI effects, filmmakers are depicting the end of the world ever more stunningly.

The authors explore the phenomenon of the cinematic apocalypse and its origins in both our anxieties and our real-world events, and they identify some flashes of hope in the desolate landscape.

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Newly Published: Murder Files from Scotland Yard and the Black Museum

New on our bookshelf today:

Murder Files from Scotland Yard and the Black Museum
R. Michael Gordon

From the files of Scotland Yard’s “Black Museum” (open only to police officers) come true crime stories of some of the most infamous murder cases of the 19th and 20th centuries—the Lambeth Poisoner, “baby farmer” Amelia Elizabeth Dyer, the Gentleman Vampire of Bournemouth, the Brides in the Bath Murders, the Rillington Place murders and many others. Along the way, investigators pass a number of crime-solving milestones, included the first use of fingerprint technology, the early use of photography and the first time “The Yard” enlisted the press to help hunt down a killer.

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Newly Published: Middle Georgia and the Approach of Modernity

New on our bookshelf today:

Middle Georgia and the Approach of Modernity: Essays on Race, Culture and Daily Life, 1885–1945
Edited by Fred R. van Hartesveldt

By eve of the 20th century, Middle Georgia was a rural region transitioning from the aftermath of the Reconstruction Era into the modern age. This collection of new essays describes the lives of the common people of the day. A grisly mass murder underscored issues of race, class and poverty. African Americans struggled for self-betterment against the rise of Jim Crow. Women striving to overcome gender barriers found a hero in a pioneering Georgian female pilot. The government worked to protect communities from the influenza pandemic of 1918. Fighting boll weevils and declining cotton prices, farmers diversified crops and developed of a national pimento pepper industry.

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Newly Published: Field Recordings of Black Singers and Musicians

New on our bookshelf today:

Field Recordings of Black Singers and Musicians: An Annotated Discography of Artists from West Africa, the Caribbean and the Eastern and Southern United States, 1901–1943
Compiled by Craig Martin Gibbs

Traditional African musical forms have long been accepted as fundamental to the emergence of blues and jazz. Yet there has been little effort at compiling recorded evidence to document their development. This discography brings together hundreds of recordings that trace in detail the evolution of the African American musical experience, from early wax cylinder recordings made in West Africa to voodoo rituals from the Carribean Basin to the songs of former slaves in the American South.

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Newly Published: Genealogy and the Librarian

New on our bookshelf today:

Genealogy and the Librarian: Perspectives on Research, Instruction, Outreach and Management
Edited by Carol Smallwood and Vera Gubnitskaia

D. Joshua Taylor, host of Genealogy Roadshow and president of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, notes: “The increasing popularity of the topic requires that any librarian who encounters genealogical customers remain on the forefront of new developments in the field.” Covering trends, issues and case studies, this collection presents 34 new essays by library professionals actively engaged in helping patrons with genealogy research across the United States.

Topics include strategies for finding military and court records, mapping family migration and settlement, creating and accessing local digital services, and developing materials and instruction for patrons.

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Newly Published: The Forensic Comicologist

New on our bookshelf today:

The Forensic Comicologist: Insights from a Life in Comics
Jamie Newbold

A childhood comic book fan turned comic book retailer, the author soon discovered the prevalence of scams in the world of comics collecting. This book is his tutorial on how to collect wisely and reduce risks. Drawing on skills learned from 20 years with the San Diego Police Department and as a Comic-Con attendee since 1970, he covers in detail the history and culture of collecting comic books and describes the pitfalls, including common deceptions of grading, pricing, as well as theft, and mail and insurance fraud.

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Newly Published: “The game’s afoot”

New on our bookshelf today:

“The game’s afoot”: A Sports Lover’s Introduction to Shakespeare
Cynthia Lewis

Like the age-old feud between the Montagues and Capulets in Romeo and Juliet, the enduring rivalry between the Boston Celtics and the LA Lakers makes for great drama. Macbeth’s career began with promise but ended in ruin—not unlike Pete Rose’s. Twelfth Night’s Viola’s disguise as a boy to enter into a man’s world is echoed in Babe Didrikson Zaharias’ challenge to the pro golf patriarchy when she competed in the Los Angeles Open.

Exploring parallels between Shakespeare’s plays and famous events in the world of sports, this book introduces seven of the best-known plays to the sports enthusiast and offers a fresh perspective to Shakespeare devotees.

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Two New Titles Reviewed in Booklist

The Women of Orphan Black: Faces of the Feminist Spectrum
Valerie Estelle Frankel
“Frankel takes a deep dive into the sci-fi cult hit Orphan Black…explor[es] how the show challenged female stereotypes and the often-limiting categories women are put into on screen by creating female characters who were radically different despite having the same DNA…examines each character in depth…Frankel also illuminates the science at the heart of the show, along with the many literary allusions referenced each season…smart analysis”

Magic in Britain: A History of Medieval and Earlier Practices
Robin Melrose
“The author allows the reader to see how the relationship between magic and the church changed over time…a collection of fascinating stories about people, places, and practices”

 

 

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Newly Published: The Chinese Information War

New on our bookshelf today:

The Chinese Information War: Espionage, Cyberwar, Communications Control and Related Threats to United States Interests, 2d ed.
Dennis F. Poindexter

China’s information war against the United States is clever technically, broadly applied and successful. The intelligence community in the U.S. has publicly stated this is a kind of war we do not know how to fight—yet it is the U.S. military that developed and expanded the doctrine of information war.

In fact, the U.S. military is at a disadvantage because it is part of a democratic, decentralized system of government that separates the state from commercial business. China’s political systems are more easily adapted to this form of warfare, as their recent land seizures in the South China Sea demonstrate. We call this annexation, when it is a new form of conquest.

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Newly Published: H.P. Lovecraft

New on our bookshelf today:

H.P. Lovecraft: Selected Works, Critical Perspectives and Interviews on His Influence
H.P. Lovecraft
Edited by Leverett Butts

This collection of H.P. Lovecraft’s most influential works presents several of his most famous stories, a sampling of his poetry and an abridgment of his monograph Supernatural Horror in Literature, with commentary providing background and context. Criticism is included from such scholars as S.T. Joshi and Robert M. Price, along with essays by writers Brad Strickland and T.E.D. Klein, and interviews with Pulitzer-nominated author Richard Monaco (Parsival) and award-winning novelists Cherie Priest (Boneshaker) and Caitlin Kiernan (The Drowning Girl).

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Newly Published: Space Sirens, Scientists and Princesses

New on our bookshelf today:

Space Sirens, Scientists and Princesses: The Portrayal of Women in Science Fiction Cinema
Dean Conrad

Women are now central to many science fiction films—but that has not always been the case. Female characters, from their token presence (or absence) in the silent pictures of the early 20th century to their roles as assistants, pulp princesses and sexy robots, and eventually as scientists, soldiers and academics, have often struggled to be seen and heard in a genre traditionally regarded as of men, by men and for men.

Surveying more than 650 films across 120 years, the author charts the highs and lows of women’s visibility in science fiction’s cinematic history through the effects of two world wars, social and cultural upheavals and advances in film technology.

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Newly Published: Postmodern Artistry in Medievalist Fiction

New on our bookshelf today:

Postmodern Artistry in Medievalist Fiction: An International Study
Earl R. Anderson

Focusing on modern-day fiction set in the Middle Ages or that incorporates medieval elements, this study examines storytelling components and rhetorical tropes in more than 60 works in five languages by more than 40 authors.

Medievalist fiction got its “postmodern” start with such authors as Calvino, Fuentes, Carpentier and Eco. Its momentum increased since the 1990s with writers whose work has received less critical attention, like Laura Esquivel, Tariq Ali, Matthew Pearl, Matilde Asensi, Ildefonso Falcones, Andrew Davison, Bernard Cornwell, Donnal Woolfolk Cross, Ariana Franklin, Nicole Griffith, Levi Grossman, Conn Iggulden, Edward Rutherfurd, Javier Sierra, Alan Moore and Brenda Vantrease.

The author explores a wide range of “medievalizing” tropes, discusses the negative responses of postmodernism and posits four “hard problems” in medievalist fiction.

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Newly Published: Modern Druidism

New on our bookshelf today:

Modern Druidism: An Introduction
Yowann Byghan

This introduction to modern Druidism provides a comprehensive overview of today’s pagan religion and philosophy, whose roots go back to the Celtic tribal societies of ancient Britain and Ireland. The author covers Druidism’s mythology, history and important figures and its beliefs and moral system, and describes practices, rituals and ceremonies. A gazetteer of important sacred sites in Europe and America is included, along with information about modern Druid groups and organizations.

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Newly Published: The 1958 Baltimore Colts

New on our bookshelf today:

The 1958 Baltimore Colts: Profiles of the NFL’s First Sudden Death Champions
Edited by George Bozeka

The 1958 Baltimore Colts were one of the greatest teams ever in professional football. Owned by the controversial Carroll Rosenbloom and led by head coach Weeb Ewbank and six future Hall of Fame players—Johnny Unitas, Raymond Berry, Lenny Moore, Jim Parker, Art Donovan and Gino Marchetti—they won the NFL title that season, defeating the New York Giants in the first sudden death championship game in NFL history. The Colts laid the foundation for the ultra-popular spectacle football would become with the American public.

They were a talented group of players. Many had been rejected or underappreciated at various points in their careers though they were loved and respected by the blue collar fans of Baltimore. This book tells the complete story of the ‘58 Colts and the city’s love affair with the team.

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Newly Published: Don Quixote as Children’s Literature

New on our bookshelf today:

Don Quixote as Children’s Literature: A Tradition in English Words and Pictures
Velma Bourgeois Richmond

Cervantes is regarded as the author of the first novel and the inventor of fiction. From its publication in 1605, Don Quixote—recently named the world’s best book by authors from 54 countries—has been widely translated and imitated. Among its less acknowledged imitations are stories in children’s literature.

In context of English adaptation and critical response this book explores the noble and “mad” adventures retold for children by distinguished writers and artists in Edwardian books, collections, home libraries, schoolbooks and picture books. More recent adaptations including comics and graphic novels deviate from traditional retellings. All speak to the knight-errant’s lasting influence and appeal to children.

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Newly Published: Wisconsin’s 37

New on our bookshelf today:

Wisconsin’s 37: The Lives of Those Missing in Action in the Vietnam War
Erin Miller with John B. Sharpless

The signing of the Paris Peace Accords in 1973 signified the end of the Vietnam War. American personnel returned home and the 591 American prisoners held captive in North Vietnam were released. Still, 2,646 individuals did not come home.

Thirty-seven of those missing in action were from Wisconsin. Their names appear on the largest object—a motorcycle (now part of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Collection)—ever left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Using the recollections of the soldiers’ families, friends and fellow servicemen, the author tells the story of each man’s life.

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Newly Published: Justice Perverted

New on our bookshelf today:

Justice Perverted: The Molestation Mistrial of Richard Charles Haefner
Derek J. Sherwood

In 1975, Dr. Richard Charles Haefner had it all—a Ph.D. from Penn State University, a prestigious job offer with UCLA and a thriving family business. Then it all came crashing down. Two boys who worked for Haefner accused him of sexual molestation, but allegations of police brutality, prosecutorial misconduct, bribery and corruption soon overshadowed what seemed like an “open-and-shut-case,” ultimately resulting in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s amending state law. Drawing on interviews and recently discovered documents, the author revisits the case and explores a number of open questions—including whether Haefner was set up by police as he claimed.

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Newly Published: Gay Icons

New on our bookshelf today:

Gay Icons: The (Mostly) Female Entertainers Gay Men Love
Georges-Claude Guilbert

Who are the most significant gay icons and how did they develop? What influence do they have on gay individuals and communities?

This book focuses on the superstars, femmes fatales and divas of the gay celebrity pantheon—May West, Julie Andrews, Britney Spears, RuPaul, Cher, Divine, Sharon Needles and many others—and their contributions to gay culture and the complications of sexual and gender identity. The author explores their allure along with the mechanisms of iconicity.

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Newly Published: Myth and Magic in Heavy Metal Music

New on our bookshelf today:

Myth and Magic in Heavy Metal Music
Robert McParland

Myth pervades heavy metal. With visual elements drawn from medieval and horror cinema, the genre’s themes of chaos, dissidence and alienation transmit an image of Promethean rebellion against the conventional. In dialogue with the modern world, heavy metal draws imaginatively on myth and folklore to construct an aesthetic and worldview embraced by a vast global audience. The author explores the music of Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Metallica and many others from a mythological and literary perspective.

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Newly Published: A Game of Moments

New on our bookshelf today:

A Game of Moments: Baseball Greats Remember Highlights of Their Careers
Ron Gerrard

This collection of new interviews—conducted by the author—recounts some of the pivotal moments in the careers of professional baseball players and in American history.

Negro League players Leon Day, Buck O’Neil, Monte Irvin, Wilmer Fields and Joe Black speak about their experiences on the other side of the color line. Hank Aaron relates how the challenge of breaking Babe Ruth’s home run record was not only on the diamond. Bob Feller, Cecil Travis, Tommy Henrich and Jerry Coleman describe the effects of World War II on their careers. Bobby Thompson and Ralph Branca address the “Shot Heard Round the World” in the Giants vs. Dodgers playoff of 1951.

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Military History Summer Sale

June has arrived, and with it McFarland’s military history sale.   Whether you’re a military scholar, armchair historian, veteran, genealogist, or general reader interested in gripping nonfiction, now is the time to save.  When you order direct from our website using the coupon code MILITARY25, print editions of all military history books are 25% off June 1 through June 15.  Best of luck to all with your summer reading lists!

 

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Newly Published: Idol Talk

New on our bookshelf today:

Idol Talk: Women Writers on the Teenage Infatuations That Changed Their Lives
Edited by Elizabeth Searle and Tamra Wilson

In the midst of acne, social anxiety and training bras are the teen idols that make adolescent life a little more bearable. Whether their cutouts are plastered on bedroom walls or hidden behind locker doors, there is no denying the impact of these stars on young women.

This collection of new essays explores with tenderness and humor the teen crushes of the past 50 years—from Elvis to John Lennon to Diana Ross—who have influenced the choices of women, romantically or otherwise, well into adulthood.

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Newly Published: Shocking and Sensational

New on our bookshelf today:

Shocking and Sensational: The Stories Behind Famous True Crime and Scandal Books
Julian Upton

Already part of a genre known for generating controversy, some true crime and scandal books have wielded a particular power to unsettle readers, provoke authorities and renew interest in a case. The reactions to such literature have been as contentious as the books themselves, clouding the “truth” with myths and inaccuracies.

From high-profile publishing sensations such as Ten Rillington PlaceFatal Vision and Mommie Dearestto the wealth of writing on the JFK assassination, the death of Marilyn Monroe and the Black Dahlia murder, this book delves into that hard copy era when crime and scandal books had a cultural impact beyond the genre’s film and TV documentaries, fueling outcries that sometimes matched the notoriety of the cases they discussed and leaving legacies that still resonate today.

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Newly Published: Teach Like a Gamer

New on our bookshelf today:

Teach Like a Gamer: Adapting the Instructional Design of Digital Role-Playing Games
Carly Finseth

Digital role-playing games such as Rift, Diablo III, and Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning help players develop skills in critical thinking, problem solving, digital literacy, and lifelong learning. The author examines both the benefits and the drawbacks of role-playing games and their application to real-world teaching techniques. Readers will learn how to incorporate games-based instruction into their own classes and workplace training, as well as approaches to redesigning curriculum and programs.

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Newly Published: The 1990s Teen Horror Cycle

New on our bookshelf today:

The 1990s Teen Horror Cycle: Final Girls and a New Hollywood Formula
Alexandra West

Many critics and fans refer to the 1990s as the decade that horror forgot, with few notable entries in the genre. Yet horror went mainstream in the ’90s by speaking to the anxieties of American youth during one of the country’s most prosperous eras.

No longer were films made on low budgets and dependent on devotees for success. Horror found its way onto magazine covers, fashion ads and CD soundtrack covers. “Girl power” feminism and a growing distaste for consumerism defined an audience that both embraced and rejected the commercial appeal of these films.

This in-depth study examines the youth subculture and politics of the era, focusing on such films as Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992), Scream (1996), I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997), Idle Hands(1999) and Cherry Falls (2000).

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Newly Published: Modern Science Fiction

New on our bookshelf today:

Modern Science Fiction: A Critical Analysis: The Seminal 1951 Thesis with a New Introduction and Commentary
James Gunn
Edited by Michael R. Page

James Gunn—one of the founding figures of science fiction scholarship and teaching—wrote in 1951 what is likely the first master’s thesis on modern science fiction. Portions were in the short-lived pulp magazine Dynamic but it has otherwise remained unavailable.

Here in its first full publication, the thesis explores many of the classic Golden Age stories of the 1940s and the critical perspective that informed Gunn’s essential genre history Alternate Worlds and his anthology series The Road to Science Fiction.

The editor’s introduction and commentary show the historical significance of Gunn’s work and its relevance to today’s science fiction studies.

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Newly Published: Once Upon a Time in a Dark and Scary Book

New on our bookshelf today:

Once Upon a Time in a Dark and Scary Book: The Messages of Horror Literature for Children
K. Shryock Hood

Contemporary American horror literature for children and young adults has two bold messages for readers: adults are untrustworthy, unreliable and often dangerous; and the monster always wins (as it must if there is to be a sequel).

Examining the young adult horror series and the religious horror series for children (Left Behind: The Kids) for the first time, and tracing the unstoppable monster to Seuss’s Cat in the Hat, this book sheds new light on the problematic message produced by the combination of marketing and books for contemporary American young readers.

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Newly Published: The 96th Pennsylvania Volunteers in the Civil War

New on our bookshelf today:

The 96th Pennsylvania Volunteers in the Civil War
David A. Ward

The 96th Pennsylvania Volunteers infantry regiment was formed in 1861—its ranks filled by nearly 1,200 Irish and German immigrants from Schuylkill County responding to Lincoln’s call for troops. The men saw action for three years with the Army of the Potomac’s VI Corps, participating in engagements at Gaines’ Mill, Crampton’s Gap, Salem Church and Spotsylvania. Drawing on letters, diaries, memoirs and other accounts, this comprehensive history documents their combat service from the point of view of the rank-and-file soldier, along with their views on the war, slavery, emancipation and politics.

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Newly Published: A Poisoned Life

New on our bookshelf today:

A Poisoned Life: Florence Chandler Maybrick, the First American Woman Sentenced to Death in England
Richard Jay Hutto

Florence Maybrick was the first American woman to be sentenced to death in England—for murdering her husband, a crime she almost certainly did not commit. Her 1889 trial was presided over by an openly misogynist judge who was later declared incompetent and died in an asylum. Hours before Maybrick was to be hanged, Queen Victoria reluctantly commuted her sentence to life in prison—in her opinion a woman who would commit adultery, as Maybrick had admitted, would also kill her husband.

Her children were taken from her; she never saw them again. Her mother worked for years to clear her name, enlisting the president of the United States and successive ambassadors, including Robert Todd Lincoln. Decades later, a gruesome diary was discovered that made Maybrick’s husband a prime Jack the Ripper suspect.

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Newly Published: Gale Storm

New on our bookshelf today:

Gale Storm: A Biography and Career Record
David C. Tucker

On December 31, 1939, nationwide radio audiences listened as 17-year-old Josephine Owaissa Cottle, a Texas schoolgirl, won Gateway to Hollywood’s new talent competition. Her prize was a movie contract at RKO and a memorable stage name—“Gale Storm.” One of the United States’ most beloved entertainers, she appeared in 35 films, starred in two hit television series (one was My Little Margie) and earned a gold record for “I Hear You Knockin’.”

Drawing on interviews with family, friends and colleagues, this biography provides many unpublished details of her life and career. An annotated filmography encompasses Storm’s time at Monogram Pictures, her roles in westerns and her appearances in classics such as It Happened on 5th Avenue. Her TV career is covered, including complete production histories and episode guides.

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Newly Published: The Chandler Automobile

New on our bookshelf today:

The Chandler Automobile: A History Including the Cleveland and Chandler-Cleveland Marques
James H. Lackey

Incorporated by veteran automakers in 1913, the Chandler Motor Car Company was initially successful in a fiercely competitive industry, manufacturing an array of quality automobiles at a range of prices. Yet by the late 1920s the company was floundering under mismanagement. Producing four lines of cars with numerous body styles, Chandler and its lower-priced companion marque, Cleveland, were unable to find markets for their numerous models and seemed in effect to be competing against themselves.

Drawing on numerous automotive histories and two large private collections of memorabilia, this exhaustive study of the Chandler Motor Car Company covers the automobiles in detail, including all body styles, and their changes during production. The author chronicles the growth, expansion and later troubles of Chandler and Cleveland, providing fresh insight into the formative years of the auto industry and the personalities who made it go.

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Newly Published: The Whedonverse Catalog

New on our bookshelf today:

The Whedonverse Catalog: A Complete Guide to Works in All Media
Don Macnaughtan

Director, producer and screenwriter Joss Whedon is a creative force in film, television, comic books and a host of other media. This book provides an authoritative survey of all of Whedon’s work, ranging from his earliest scriptwriting on Roseanne, through his many movie and TV undertakings—Toy Story, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Firefly/Serenity, Dr. Horrible, The Cabin in the Woods, and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.—to his forays into the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

The book covers both the original texts of the Whedonverse and the many secondary works focusing on Whedon’s projects, including about 2000 books, essays, articles, documentaries and dissertations.

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New in Softcover: Glamour Girls of Sixties Hollywood

Now available in softcover:

Glamour Girls of Sixties Hollywood: Seventy-Five Profiles
Tom Lisanti

During the 1960s, many models, Playboy centerfolds, beauty queens, and Las Vegas showgirls went on to become “decorative actresses” appearing scantily clad on film and television. This well illustrated homage to 75 of these glamour girls reveals their unique stories through individual biographical profiles, photographs, lists of major credits and, frequently, in-depth personal interviews. Included are Carol Wayne, Edy Williams, Inga Neilsen, Thordis Brandt, Jo Collins, Phyllis Davis, Melodie Johnson, and many equally unforgettable faces of sixties Hollywood.

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Newly Published: Celtic Cosmology and the Otherworld

New on our bookshelf today:

Celtic Cosmology and the Otherworld: Mythic Origins, Sovereignty and Liminality
Sharon Paice MacLeod

Despite censorship and revision by Christian redactors, the early medieval manuscripts of Ireland and Britain contain tantalizing clues to the cosmology, religion and mythology of native Celtic cultures. Focusing on the latest research and translations, the author provides fresh insight into the indigenous beliefs and practices of the Iron Age inhabitants of the British Isles. Chapters cover a broad range of topics, including creation and cosmogony, the deities of the Gaels, feminine power in early Irish sources, and priestesses and magical rites.

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Newly Published: Mavericks of Italian Cinema

New on our bookshelf today:

Mavericks of Italian Cinema: Eight Unorthodox Filmmakers, 1940s–2000s
Roberto Curti

The history of Italian cinema includes, in addition to the renowned auteurs, a number of peculiar and lesser-known filmmakers. While their artistry was often plagued with production setbacks, their works—influenced by poetry, playwriting, advertising, literature, comics and a nonconformist, sometimes antagonistic attitude—were original and thought provoking.

Drawing from official papers and original scripts, this book includes previously unpublished information on the works and lives of post–World War II filmmakers Pier Carpi, Alberto Cavallone, Riccardo Ghione, Giulio Questi, Brunello Rondi, Paolo Spinola, Augusto Tretti and Nello Vegezzi.

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Newly Published: Power Under Her Foot

New on our bookshelf today:

Power Under Her Foot: Women Enthusiasts of American Muscle Cars
Chris Lezotte

Since their introduction in 1964, American muscle cars have been closely associated with masculinity. In the 21st century, women have been a growing presence in the muscle car world, exhibiting classic cars at automotive events and rumbling to work in modern Mustangs, Camaros and Challengers.

Informed by the experiences of 88 female auto enthusiasts, this book highlights women’s admiration and passion for American muscle, and reveals how restoring, showing and driving classic and modern cars provides a means to challenge longstanding perceptions of women drivers and advance ideas of identity and gender equality.

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Newly Published: The Moulton Bicycle

New on our bookshelf today:

The Moulton Bicycle: A History of the Innovative Compact Design
Bruce D. Epperson

In 1963, British inventor Alex Moulton (1920–2012) introduced an innovative compact bicycle. Architectural Review editor Reyner Banham predicted it would give rise to “a new class of cyclists,” young urbanites riding by choice, not necessity. Forced to sell his firm in 1967, Moulton returned in the 1980s with an even more radical model, the AM—his acclaim among technology and design historians is largely due to Banham’s writings.

The AM’s price tag (some models cost many thousands of dollars) has inspired tech-savvy cyclists to create “hot rod” compact bikes from Moulton-inspired “shopper” cycles of the 1970s—a trend also foreseen by Banham, who considered hot rod culture “folk art of the mechanical era.”

The author traces the intertwined lives of two unusually creative men who had an extraordinary impact on each others’ careers, despite having met only a few times.

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Newly Published: Psience Fiction

New on our bookshelf today:

Psience Fiction: The Paranormal in Science Fiction Literature
Damien Broderick

Science fiction has often been considered the literature of futuristic technology: fantastic warfare among the stars or ruinous apocalypses on Earth. The last century, however, saw through John W. Campbell the introduction of “psience fiction,” which explores themes of mind powers—telepathy, precognition of the future, teleportation, etc.—and symbolic machines that react to such forces.

The author surveys this long-ignored literary shift through a series of influential novels and short stories published between the 1930s and the present. This discussion is framed by the sudden surge of interest in parapsychology and its absorption not only into the SF genre, but also into the real world through military experiments such as the Star Gate Program.

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Weekly Deal: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

This week, get 20% off all books about chemical sensitivity with the coupon code MCS!

Central Sensitization and Sensitivity Syndromes: A Handbook for Coping

Chemical and Electrical Hypersensitivity: A Sufferer’s Memoir

Understanding Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: Causes, Effects, Personal Experiences and Resources

Chemical Sensitivity: A Guide to Coping with Hypersensitivity Syndrome, Sick Building Syndrome and Other Environmental Illnesses

Defining Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

Autoimmune Diseases and Their Environmental Triggers

Living with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: Narratives of Coping

Environmentally Induced Illnesses: Ethics, Risk Assessment and Human Rights

Chemical Injury and the Courts: A Litigation Guide for Clients and Their Attorneys

Sauna Detoxification Therapy: A Guide for the Chemically Sensitive

 

 

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Newly Published: The Last Days of the United States Asiatic Fleet

New on our bookshelf today:

The Last Days of the United States Asiatic Fleet: The Fates of the Ships and Those Aboard, December 8, 1941–February 5, 1942
Greg H. Williams

After the attack on Pearl Harbor (December 7), American sailors of the Asiatic Fleet (where it was December 8) were abandoned by Washington and left to conduct a war on their own, isolated from the rest of the U.S. naval forces. Their fate in the Philippines and Dutch East Indies was often grim—many died aboard burning ships, were executed upon capture or spent years as prisoners of war.

Many books have been written about the ships of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet, yet few look into the experiences of the common sailor. Drawing on official reports, past research, personal memoirs and the writings of war correspondents, the author tells the story of those who never came home in 1945.

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Newly Published: Eminent Domain and Economic Growth

New on our bookshelf today:

Eminent Domain and Economic Growth: Perspectives on Benefits, Harms and New Trends
Edited by Joaquin Jay Gonzalez III, Roger L. Kemp and Jonathan Rosenthal

Eminent domain is integral to a government’s legal ability to take private property for a public purpose. If used correctly, the owners are paid the fair market value for their property, few citizens are inconvenienced and everyone benefits. Bad-faith abuses of eminent domain typically make the front pages of news outlets, and receive news coverage from television stations, in cities throughout our nation. To educate citizens and prevent future abuse, this book exposes both the good and the bad aspects of government’s ability to use their power of eminent domain to acquire private property.

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Newly Published: The 1967 American League Pennant Race

New on our bookshelf today:

The 1967 American League Pennant Race: Four Teams, Six Weeks, One Winner
Cameron Bright

In 1967, in the midst of a nail-biting six-week pennant race, the Red Sox, Tigers, Twins and White Sox stood deadlocked atop the American League. Never before or since have four teams tied for the lead in baseball’s final month. The stakes were high—there were no playoffs, the pennant winner went directly to the World Series.

Here, for the first time, all four teams are treated as equals. The author describes their contrasting skill sets, leadership and temperament. The stress of such stiff and sustained competition was constant, and there were overt psychological and physical intimidations playing a major role throughout the season. The standings were volatile and so were emotions. The players and managers varied: some wilted or broke, others responded heroically.