African Americans and ROTC

Military, Naval and Aeroscience Programs at Historically Black Colleges, 1916–1973

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About the Book

This work covers Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) detachments at historically African American colleges and universities throughout the United States from the inception of the Student Army Training Corps to the advanced programs currently in place. The armistices following World War I allowed for ROTC programs to be set up, World War II saw a push for recruits, and American participation in Vietnam made use of black soldiers more than ever. Despite African American participation in the military in war and peace, it took nearly 60 years for black collegiate education institutions (around 1973) to fulfill their need for Army, Navy and Air Force ROTC programs producing commissioned officers.
The book discusses the beginnings of the ROTC programs at African American colleges with the Student Army Training Corps and the establishment, expansion and reorganization of the programs that followed. The acquisition of Air Force and Navy ROTC programs are discussed and all the revisions to the various programs thereafter, including opening them up to women.

About the Author(s)

Charles Johnson, Jr., is an associate professor at Morgan State University and lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

Bibliographic Details

Charles Johnson, Jr.
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 311
Bibliographic Info: photos, notes, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2002
pISBN: 978-0-7864-1324-9
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      vii

Preface      1

1 Student Army Training Corps     5

2 Establishing ROTC Detachments     18

3 Reactivation, Reorganization and Expansion of ROTC     58

4 Air Force and Navy ROTC     110

5 Aeroscience and Military Science Polices     130

6 Revisions and Extensions of Military Science, Aeroscience and Naval Science    168

Notes     213

Bibliography     277

Index     287

Book Reviews & Awards

“exhaustively detailed…factually dense…fine reference volume…recommended”—Choice.