The Civil War Roster of Davidson County, North Carolina

Biographies of 1,996 Men Before, During and After the Conflict

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SKU: 9780786461219 Categories: , ,

About the Book

During the War Between the States, Davidson County, North Carolina, sent nearly 2,000 men into service with the infantry, cavalry, artillery, navy, militia, and home guard. Each of these men left behind home, family, and occupation in order to serve; some would never return; others would return wounded in body and in spirit; 47 served in the Union Army. This is a roster with full biographies of each one of them. The data were researched for years in four census records (1840–1870), marriage records, land transfers, cemetery records, family file folders, books, journals, obituaries. Each man’s entry includes rank, unit(s), and personal and military history. Birth, death, marriage dates, parents, spouses, children; letters, journals, news articles: all are set forth in each entry, edited only for overall length. Photographs are included for many of the men. Also included is an overview of Davidson County’s involvement in the conflict, and a bibliography.

About the Author(s)

Christopher M. Watford, a high school teacher, is a member of the Central Piedmont Historic Preservation Association and the Davidson County (North Carolina) Civil War Roundtable. He lives in the Light area near Thomasville, North Carolina.

Bibliographic Details

Christopher M. Watford
Format: softcover (8.5 x 11)
Pages: 304
Bibliographic Info: 116 photos, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2011 [2001]
pISBN: 978-0-7864-6121-9
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Preface      vii

Acknowledgments      ix

Introduction      1

Davidson County Before, During and After the War: A Brief History      3

THE ROSTER      17

Bibliography      275

Index      279

Book Reviews & Awards

“painstakingly researched…admirable…recommended”—ARBA; “the cutting edge of Civil War studies…‘Battles and Leaders’ approach is no longer enough…we have to understand the Confederate fighting man not just as soldier, but as civilian member of civilian community, sent off to war”—Crossfire; “an extensive genealogical reference book…the author’s thoroughness in seeking out all the records which identify an individual [is remarkable]. Well Done!”—The Civil War Courier; “comb[s] genealogical sources”—Civil War Book Review.