The Women of Afghanistan Under the Taliban

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SKU: 9780786410903 Categories: , , ,

About the Book

Even though the people of Afghanistan in general suffered under the rule of the Taliban, women lived especially difficult lives, enduring terrible hardships. They were denied basic human rights, forced to wear veils and kept in seclusion. This work addresses the religion, revolution, and national identity of Afghan women and places them within their gender-political and religious-political roles, thus elevating our understanding of their abuse, imprisonment and murder, and offering a basis for their rehabilitation. Powerful and moving interviews with Afghan women conducted and translated by the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan are presented and a brief history of the struggle of the Afghan women and an overview of the conflict between the Afghans and the Taliban are included.

About the Author(s)

The late Rosemarie Skaine was a sociologist and lived in Cedar Falls, Iowa. Her writing interests included families and women’s issues.

Bibliographic Details

Rosemarie Skaine
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 200
Bibliographic Info: appendices, tables, notes, glossary, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2002
pISBN: 978-0-7864-1090-3
eISBN: 978-0-7864-8174-3
Imprint: McFarland

Book Reviews & Awards

“comprehensive…detail[s] the radical changes life in Afghanistan underwent under the rule of the Taliban…will appeal to readers curious about the conditions for women in Afghanistan prior to the overthrow of the Taliban. A perfect text for classes studying contemporary Afghanistan”—Booklist; “powerfully moving personal interviews”—American Libraries; “a balanced and informative portrayal of a horrific situation…information from a wide array of international, Afghan, and women’s organizations…highly recommended”—Counterpoise; “readable and accessible…women’s history, education, fashion and other social aspects are described in detail…women are clearly going to be the major healing and uniting force in Afghan society”—Far Eastern Economic Review; “well organized, detailing Afghan women’s roles…rich and informative…provides ample fodder for discussion and investigation”—VOYA; “relevant…knowing the history of the continually alternating bestowal and taking away of human rights for women in Afghanistan reminds us that, well, history can repeat itself”—The San Francisco Examiner; “powerful and moving”—The Mountain Times; “heartbreaking, yet inspiring stories…extensive research”—Hastings Tribune.