The Films of Oliver Reed

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SKU: 9780786439065 Categories: , , , ,

About the Book

From the obscure 1958 Sonja Henie vehicle Hello London to the 2000 Academy Award winner Gladiator, the screen career of dynamic British actor Oliver Reed (1937–1999) is thoroughly documented in this illustrated filmography. Following a concise biography, the authors chronologically list all 96 of Reed’s films, among them The Curse of the Werewolf, Oliver!, The Devils, The Three Musketeers and Tommy. Each entry contains extensive cast and production credits, a synopsis, critical commentary and contemporary reviews.
Included are forewords by actors Sir Christopher Lee and Ron Moody, and an afterword by Oliver Reed’s frequent director Michael Winner. Additional comments by Reed’s friends and coworkers Janette Scott, Catherine Feller, William Hobbs, Jennie Linden, Jimmy Sangster and Samantha Eggar provide fascinating and insightful offscreen glimpses of a major cinema icon.

About the Author(s)

Susan D. Cowie is a retired school principal and avid Egyptologist living in Kent, England.
Tom Johnson, author of several books on horror cinema, taught and coached cross country and track for 30 years. He is still involved in the school system and lives in Shillington, Pennsylvania.

Bibliographic Details

Susan D. Cowie and Tom Johnson
Format: softcover (7 x 10)
Pages: 276
Bibliographic Info: 86 photos, appendix, filmography, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2011
pISBN: 978-0-7864-3906-5
eISBN: 978-0-7864-8677-9
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      ix

Foreword by Sir Christopher Lee, CBE      1

Foreword by Ron Moody      5

Preface      9

A Brief Biography of Oliver Reed      11

Friends and Colleagues Remember Him      15

THE FILMS      25

Afterword by Michael Winner, OBE      257

Appendix: Television Dramas      259

Bibliography      261

Index      263

Book Reviews & Awards

“it is about time such a book came out that concentrates on the fine performer that Oliver Reed was, not just his non-film escapades”—Little Shoppe of Horrors; “recommended”—ARBA.