The Bob Hope Films

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About the Book

Bob Hope got his start in show business when he was in his twenties, remained active past the age of 90, and lived to be 100. His longevity was remarkable, especially when one considers that he was active in vaudeville, radio, motion pictures and television. He excelled in each of these popular forms of entertainment, but his films are the most genuine testaments to his timeless comedy. His smart quips, fast pace, and breezy manner were perfect ingredients for the brand of comedy that was popular during World War II and the years immediately following the war.
This book begins with a discussion of Bob Hope’s early career and the short films that he starred in, and then covers each of the Hope films beginning with The Big Broadcast of 1938. The Hope films, the author says, do not have deep subtexts or clever cinematic innovations, but provide clever, uplifting entertainment that continues to inspire laughter and offer solid examples of the humor that made Americans smile during and after World War II. Cast and credit information is provided for each film.

About the Author(s)

James L. Neibaur is a film historian and educator with more than 20 books and hundreds of articles appearing in Cineaste, Classic Images, Film Quarterly, Films in Review, Filmfax, and Encyclopædia Britannica.

Bibliographic Details

James L. Neibaur
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 208
Bibliographic Info: photos, appendices, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2005
pISBN: 978-0-7864-1050-7
eISBN: 978-1-4766-0997-3
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      vi
Introduction      1
The Early Career Of Bob Hope      5
The Short Subjects      8
The Films      12
The Road Picture That Never Was      164
Appendix A: Hope’s Cameo Appearances      167
Appendix B: Hope On Radio      170
Appendix C: Hope On Television      173
Afterword      189
Bibliography      193
Index      195

Book Reviews & Awards

“a handy reference”—ARBA; “entertaining”—Film Review.