The Babe Chases 60

That Fabulous 1927 Season, Home Run by Home Run

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SKU: 9780786493678 Categories: , ,

About the Book

Homer-by-homer, this heavily researched work recounts the inimitable Babe Ruth’s finest season. In that magical 1927 season, Ruth blasted homers off 33 different pitchers and hit at least one against every American League opponent. Two hurlers yielded four homers each to the Bambino, while seven pitchers allowed at least three. Interwoven with this recounting is the story of the budding rivalry between Ruth and teammate Lou Gehrig, as the two Yankees matched homers for much of the season. Fresh statistical analyses are provided and boxscores are included for all games in which Ruth hit a home run.

About the Author(s)

John G. Robertson is a private tutor and sports historian who lives in Cambridge, Ontario. He is also the author of several books on baseball history.

Bibliographic Details

John G. Robertson
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 188
Bibliographic Info: 2 photos, 62 tables, statistics, appendices, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2014 [1999]
pISBN: 978-0-7864-9367-8
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      ix

Introduction      1

1. Babe Ruth Before 1927      7

2. Spring Training 1927      25

3. The 1927 Season      33

4. The 1927 World Series      147

5. Babe Ruth After 1927      153

Epilogue      163

Appendices

-A. Summary of the Home Runs     

-B. Statistical Breakdown of the Home Runs      167

-C. 1927 Batting and Pitching Statistics of the Yankees      169

Bibliography      171

Index      173

Book Reviews & Awards

“those who followed the daily doings of McGwire and Sosa will find the Bambino’s home run quest to be just as riveting”—USA Today Sports Weekly; “thanks to Robertson’s incredibly researched book everything is there…the book is a treasure trove of information & fun to read”—One More Inning; “a must-read”—Public Library Quarterly; “leave it to McFarland & Company…to bring Ruth back into the discussion”—The Cincinnati Enquirer.