The American Military Mission to China, 1941–1942

Lend-Lease Logistics, Politics and the Tangles of Wartime Cooperation

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About the Book

This is an overview of America’s first effort in military aid to a foreign sovereign nation at a time when Europe was engaged in open warfare, Asia was facing a series of military confrontations, and most of the world thought global conflagration was inevitable. The work offers insight into the impact of war in Burma, a backwater of World War II, and examines events that result when great powers go to great lengths to further their own goals. The work also examines disagreements among China, the United Kingdom, the United States and Japan, and shows the evolution of aid provision to another country and changing expectations as new information arises.

About the Author(s)

After enlisted duty as a combat engineer, William G. Grieve received a direct commission to the United States Marine Corps and retired as a colonel with 30 years of service. He lives in Forsyth, Illinois.

Bibliographic Details

William G. Grieve
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 264
Bibliographic Info: 15 photos, 2 maps, notes, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2014
pISBN: 978-0-7864-7556-8
eISBN: 978-1-4766-1290-4
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Table of Contents


Preface  1

Introduction  7

1.  Creation of the Mission: Why AMMISCA Was Established  13

2.  America Before the Lend-Lease Program: Isolationism and Anti-War Feelings  26

3.  The Commanders: The Leaders of World War II in Asia  35

4.  Culture Clash: The Historical Foundation of Sino-Western Relations  52

5.  The Antecedents of the Burma-to-China Supply Route  74

6.  Early East Asian Advisory Missions  88

7.  Maintenance and Repairs on the Burma Road  96

8.  The Mission’s Involvement at Rangoon  100

9.  Logistics Problems on the Burma Road  127

10.  The Mission’s Role in the American Volunteer Group  158

11.  International Strategic Planning  179

12.  The Culmination of AMMISCA  201

Epilogue  211

Chapter Notes  217

Bibliography  239

Index  249