Italian Crime Filmography, 1968–1980

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About the Book

In 1970s Italy, after the decline of the Spaghetti Western, crime films became the most popular, profitable and controversial genre. In a country plagued with violence, political tensions and armed struggle, these films managed to capture the anxiety and anger of the times in their tales of tough cops, ruthless criminals and urban paranoia. Recent years have seen renewed critical interest in the genre, thanks in part to such illustrious fans as Quentin Tarantino.
This book examines all of the 220+ crime films produced in Italy between 1968 and 1980, the period when the genre first appeared and grew to its peak. Entries include a complete cast and crew list, home video releases, a plot summary and the author’s own analysis. Excerpts from a variety of sources are included: academic texts, contemporary reviews, and interviews with filmmakers, scriptwriters and actors. There are many onset stills and film posters.

About the Author(s)

Roberto Curti is an Italian film historian and a contributor to periodicals and to books published in Italy, Great Britain and Spain. He lives in Cortona, Italy.

Bibliographic Details

Roberto Curti
Format: softcover (8.5 x 11)
Pages: 332
Bibliographic Info: 74 photos, appendices, notes, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2013
pISBN: 978-0-7864-6976-5
eISBN: 978-1-4766-1208-9
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Table of Contents


Preface  1

An Overview of Italian Crime Films, 1947–1967  5

Abbreviations  9

Italian Crime Films, 1968–1980  11

Appendix One: Italian Crime Films, 1981–2013  283

Appendix Two: Italian Crime Films’ Most Significant Directors  289

Appendix Three: Stars of Italian Crime Films  300

Bibliography  313

Index  315

Book Reviews & Awards

“a fine addition”—ARBA; “stacked with information…well written, informative and interesting…it’s clear the author is incredibly knowledgeable about his subject and that the films were researched very thoroughly…it’s a treasure trove of information”—Toxic Graveyard.