Human Rights in Islamic North Africa

Clashes Between Constitutional Laws and Penal Codes

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About the Book

It is one thing to craft superb human rights tenets in a constitution and another to enforce such policies in practice. This book explores the contradictions between interpretations of constitutional tenets and the dogmas contained in the penal code of Islamic North Africa—particularly in regard to Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia. Provided are brief histories of each country that connect the colonial past to present-day human rights records. The author also suggests ways in which to mitigate human rights infractions to advance peaceful coexistence that could promote political and economic development.

About the Author(s)

E. Ike Udogu is a professor of government and faculty fellow in the department of Government and Justice Studies at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. The author of numerous books, he is the former director of research and publication for the African Studies and Research Forum and a former president of the Association of Third World Studies.

Bibliographic Details

E. Ike Udogu
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 264
Bibliographic Info: appendices, notes, bibliography index
Copyright Date: 2020
pISBN: 978-1-4766-8065-1
eISBN: 978-1-4766-3869-0
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vi
Abbreviations and Acronyms ix
Preface 1
Introduction: A Constitution vs. a Penal Code—The Discourse 4
1. Algeria 15
2. Egypt 43
3. Libya 75
4. Morocco 104
5. Tunisia 134
Appendix A: Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment 165
Appendix B: International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights 177
Appendix C: Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women 194
Chapter Notes 209
Bibliography 229
Index 245