George Cukor

A Critical Study and Filmography

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About the Book

This work illuminates the art of George Cukor, the director of some of the most acclaimed and popular films ever to come out of Hollywood. Eight films, ranging in time from David Copperfield (1935) to Rich and Famous (1981) and in mood from the fairy-tale comedy of The Philadelphia Story to the intense melodrama of Cukor’s masterpiece, A Star Is Born, are closely analyzed in a search for the elusive secret of Cukor’s success. Through his long and varied body of work Cukor was preoccupied with certain themes of enduring significance that found expression through his mastery of film direction. More than a mere Hollywood craftsman or the congenial collaborator of such Hollywood luminaries as Hepburn, Grant, Tracy, and Monroe, George Cukor was a true film artist.

About the Author(s)

The late James Bernardoni lived in Los Angeles, California.

Bibliographic Details

James Bernardoni
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 190
Bibliographic Info: 21 photos, filmography, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2013 [1985]
pISBN: 978-0-7864-7374-8
eISBN: 978-1-4766-0501-2
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      vii

Introduction      1

1. David Copperfield (1935)      5
2. Zaza (1939)      21
The Thirties      31
3. The Philadelphia Story (1940)      33
The Forties      45
4. Adam’s Rib (1949)      47
5. A Star is Born (1954)      67
The Fifties      95
6. Let’s Make Love (1960)      97
7. Heller in Pink Tights (1960)      113
The Final Years      131
8. Rich and Famous (1981)      133
9. The Art of George Cukor      151

Filmography      161
Bibliography      173
Index      177

Book Reviews & Awards

“solid addition to the limited scholarship available on Cukor”—Choice; “critically analyzes Cukor’s directorial style”—Sightlines; “pays proper tribute to this fine director. Enjoyable reading and good critical explanations result in a satisfying book. It restores the luster to one of the finer directors”—Classic Images.