Cyborgs, Santa Claus and Satan

Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films Made for Television

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About the Book

In the three decades since the first SF film produced for television—1968’s Shadow on the Land—nearly 600 films initially released to television have had science fiction, fantasy, or horror themes. Featuring superheroes, monsters, time travel, and magic, these films range from the phenomenal to the forgettable, from low-budget to blockbuster.
Information on all such American releases from 1968 through 1998 is collected here. Each entry includes cast and credits, a plot synopsis, qualitative commentary, and notes of interest on aspects of the film. Appendices provide a list of other films that include some science fiction, horror, or fantasy elements; a film chronology; and a guide to alternate titles.

About the Author(s)

A former Florida reporter, Fraser A. Sherman has contributed articles to such publications as Newsweek, Boys Life and Movie Marketplace and is the author of three previous film books and more than two dozen published speculative-fiction short stories. He lives in Durham, North Carolina.

Bibliographic Details

Fraser A. Sherman
Format: softcover (7 x 10)
Pages: 288
Bibliographic Info: chronology, appendices, index
Copyright Date: 2009 [2000]
pISBN: 978-0-7864-4341-3
eISBN: 978-1-4766-1101-3
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      vi

Introduction      1

The Films      5

Appendix A: Minor Genre Films      203

Appendix B: Alternative Titles      217

Appendix C: Chronology      218

Index      223

Book Reviews & Awards

“a fact-filled guide…a good reference”—ARBA; “the only work of its kind and includes a good index”—Choice; “offers information of value…a good addition to a comprehensive film collection”—Communication Booknotes Quarterly; “a ton of useful info in this book”—Shock Cinema; “supplies great detail on each of the films…offers lively synopses and reviews of each…the first of its kind, and essential for the shelf of any self-respecting cult film buff”—Hitch.