Colonel Albert Pope and His American Dream Machines

The Life and Times of a Bicycle Tycoon Turned Automotive Pioneer

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About the Book

In the 1890s Colonel Albert A. Pope was hailed as a leading American automaker. That his name is not a household word today is the very essence of his story.
Pope’s production methods as the world’s largest manufacturer of bicycles led to the building of automobiles with lightweight metals, rubber tires, precision machining, interchangeable parts, and vertical integration. The founder of the Good Roads Movement, Pope entered automobile manufacturing while steam, electricity, and gasoline power were still vying for supremacy. The story of his failed dream of dominating U.S. automobile production is an engrossing view into America’s industrial history.

About the Author(s)

Stephen B. Goddard practices law and teaches history and public policy at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. The author of three books, he also writes for HistoryWire.com.

Bibliographic Details

Stephen B. Goddard
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 263
Bibliographic Info: 36 photos, notes, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2009 [2000]
pISBN: 978-0-7864-4089-4
eISBN: 978-1-4766-1334-5
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      vii

Preface      1

1. The Watershed      3

2. Lumbering Is What Popes Do      19

3. A Bloody Crucible      33

4. He Casts His Lot      58

5. Wheels for All      66

6. Milking the Market      91

7. Indispensable Roads      115

8. The Wunderkind      124

9. A Patented Formula      143

10. Like a Dog with a Bone      166

11. Triumphant Return      181

12. Parting      201

13. Leaving His Mark      207

Epilogue      220

Appendix 1: The Ford Enigma      233

Appendix 2: Pope Manufacturing Company Corporate Genealogy      237

Bibliography      241

Index      247

Book Reviews & Awards

“a wonderful job…fascinating bits of history…a valuable index and thorough bibliography. An important edition”—Choice; “detailed…lots of history is revealed in an interesting and enlightening manner”—Old Cars Weekly; “[a] lively biography”—SciTech Book News.