Bushville

Life and Time in Amateur Baseball

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SKU: 9780786409792 Categories: ,

About the Book

From Bushville: “The game is a fine construct. Its trace through anyone’s life can range from a youthful diversion to a full-blown career, a tender small-fingered grasp to a deep muscular understanding. It provides a focus and a way to express the physical self in a physical world. I’ve played every moment of every game in my life as an amateur in the best sense of that word—doing something I love just for the love of it. The roots of that soulful effort run as deep as my earliest memories, measuring them. And possibly, yours likewise.”
To play baseball is to become part of the game. One need not be a megabuck star to live baseball as a participant, to figure into its geometry and its drama. The friendly exertions of amateur play lie at the heart of the sport, comprising the wellspring of its professional levels.
Here viewed as a pastime through the eyes of a lifelong amateur player, baseball unfolds as an experience of motion and time and senses—the work of muscle, the textures of wood and leather, the warmth of sun, the scents of a grassy field. In the timeless continuity of the game can be glimpsed part of baseball’s singular appeal: the lively tension between the momentary and the eternal, what is over and what is never over. The interwoven essays making up Bushville are a poignant reflection upon the pursuit of what is essentially a ball, but what is crucially human as well.

About the Author(s)

Technical writer and web developer Jerry Kelly lives in Gambier, Ohio.

Bibliographic Details

Jerry Kelly
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 208
Bibliographic Info: photos, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2001
pISBN: 978-0-7864-0979-2
eISBN: 978-0-7864-5040-4
Imprint: McFarland

Book Reviews & Awards

Booklist Starred Review. Finalist, Casey Award—Spitball
“a memorable book…will be treasured”—Booklist; “presents the unabashed personal mediations of a man nearly fifty years old for whom playing the game has been a vital—but not exclusive—part of his life. Coming of age and aging both on the diamond and off have been, for this amateur, richly rewarding”—Nine; “his interwoven essays will remind many readers of their own memories of ‘playing the game”’—Sports Collectors Digest; “some of the freshest, most memorable, and most eloquent writing about baseball…wonderful”—Spitball; “a must”—Ohioana Quarterly.