Ballplayers in the Great War

Newspaper Accounts of Major Leaguers in World War I Military Service

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About the Book

This volume presents carefully selected, and annotated, articles about major-leaguers serving at home and overseas in the U.S. armed forces during World War I. Some continued to play ball in the military. Others fought the Germans in the trenches, in the air and at sea. Several lost their lives in combat or to disease. A few became heroes. From future Hall of Famers to journeymen and unknowns, each did his duty.

About the Author(s)

Author and editor Jim Leeke is a contributor to the SABR Baseball Biography Project and the creative director of Taillight Communications. He lives in Columbus, Ohio.

Bibliographic Details

Compiled and annotated by Jim Leeke. Series Editors Gary Mitchem and Mark Durr
Format: softcover (6 x 8)
Pages: 268
Bibliographic Info: 53 photos, notes, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2013
pISBN: 978-0-7864-7546-9
eISBN: 978-1-4766-0364-3
Imprint: McFarland
Series: The McFarland Historical Baseball Library

Table of Contents

Table of Contents


Preface 1

 1. Taking the Field 5

 2. Starting Battery 40

 3. Fast Nines 62

 4. Soldiers 85

 5. Sailors 117

 6. Marines 141

 7. Aviators 158

 8. Gas and Flame 172

 9. Officers and Gentlemen 193

10. The King’s Game 230

Biographical Notes on Selected Major Leaguers 247

Sources 253

Index 255

Book Reviews

“One of the best but least-heralded developments in the recent history of baseball literature was the inauguration of the McFarland Historical Baseball Library in 2003”—I>Spitball; “invaluable McFarland Historical Baseball Library series”—Edward Achorn, The Providence Journal; “Using…primary sources, Leeke shows how the war had a powerful impact on the game of baseball, causing the 1918 season to end early and leading 64 percent of National League players to go on active duty…. The book is a worthy addition to the McFarland Historical Baseball Library series.”—H-NET Reviews.