Arthurian Legends on Film and Television

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About the Book

The Arthurian legends are a crucial part of Western culture. With their enduring themes, archetypal characters, and complex plots, it is not surprising that the stories of Camelot should find their way into films and television programs.
From the moody (Excalibur) to the looney (“Knighty Knight Bugs”), more than 250 entries give complete credits, synopses, and analyses. Included are works based solely on Arthur and his literary origins and works that feature other figures, like Galahad, Percival, and the operatic favorites Tristan and Isolde. Also included are animated films, parodies like Monty Python’s, films like Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade with Arthurian themes, and television series with Arthurian episodes such as Babylon 5 and MacGyver. Operatic and dramatic works recorded for film and television (like Camelot) are also covered. Appendices, bibliography and index.

About the Author(s)

A former journalist and photographer, Bert Olton is a member of the International Arthurian Society. He is a freelance writer living in New York.

Bibliographic Details

Bert Olton
Format: softcover (7 x 10)
Pages: 351
Bibliographic Info: 42 photos, appendices, bibliography, index
Copyright Date: 2009 [2000]
pISBN: 978-0-7864-4076-4
eISBN: 978-1-4766-1013-9
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      vii

Preface      1

THE FILMS AND TELEVISION PROGRAMS      3

Appendix I: Chronological Listing of Films and Television Programs      315

Appendix II: Films and Television Programs with Possible Arthurian Content      319

Bibliography      321

Index      325

Book Reviews & Awards

“recommended”—Booklist; “unique…a valuable source of information”—ARBA; “a clear, easy writing style that is engaging and compulsively readable…an excellent index…solid information in an easily assimilated form”—VOYA; “recommended…detail[ed]…informative”—Reference Reviews; “Olton’s work is a valuable resource…thorough and complete”—Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts; “comprehensive…[a] nicely-produced volume”—Interzone.