Adapted from the Original

Essays on the Value and Values of Works Remade for a New Medium

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About the Book

Critics and audiences often judge films, books and other media as “great” —but what does that really mean? This collection of new essays examines the various criteria by which degrees of greatness (or not-so) are constructed—whether by personal, political or social standards—through topics in cinema, literature and adaptation. The contributors recognize how issues of value vary across different cultures, and explore what those differences say about attitudes and beliefs.

About the Author(s)

The late Laurence Raw (1959–2018) published in the field of film adaptations and performance and taught English at Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey.

Bibliographic Details

Edited by Laurence Raw
Format: softcover (6 x 9)
Pages: 268
Bibliographic Info: 25 photos, notes, bibliographies, index
Copyright Date: 2018
pISBN: 978-0-7864-7872-9
eISBN: 978-1-4766-3287-2
Imprint: McFarland

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Introduction (Laurence Raw) 1
Part I. Genealogy
The Agency and Value of Remakes: The ­Television-to-Film
Adaptation (Kenneth A. Longden) 15
“I make all things new”: Describing the Ongoing Adaptation
in the ­Judeo-Christian Bible (Allen H. Redmon) 21
Origin-Ality: Sources and Adaptations of Francophone Voices
(Rebecca M. Pauly) 34
“No one ever sees the Angel”: Adapting The Phantom
of the Opera (Leslie McMurtry) 41
Fingersmith or Handmaiden: Adaptations from the ­Neo-Victorian
Era to Contemporary Asia (Ela İpek Gündüz) 59
Reshaping Gloriana: Representations of the British Queens
in Victoria (2016) and The Crown (2016) (Dorota Babilas) 67
Shakespearean Adaptation as Challenge: Edward Bond’s Lear
(Özlem Özmen) 82
Food for Thought or “mental chewing gum”: Truman Capote’s
Crime Adaptations and Cultural Memory Work (Suzanne Diamond) 91
Textual Museums in Edith Wharton and Orhan Pamuk (Hülya Yağcıoğlu) 115
Part II. Ontology
Caesar Must Die (2012): Shakespeare in Prison (Hui Wu) 127
Pride and Prejudice and Programming: A Stylometric Analysis (Agata Hołobut and Jan Rybicki) 134
Aki Kaurismäki’s “outrageously improvisatory” Adaptations of Four Familiar Literary Source Texts (Dennis Rothermel) 148
“This is how I lied about coming up with the idea for writing about The Brothers Grimm [2005]”: Incoherent Narration in Terry Gilliam’s Adaptation (Wickham Clayton) 168
Towards a Method for Negotiating Adaptation versus Allusion
(Christopher Wydler )181
Finding Value through “Personal Baggage” (Charles R. Hamilton) 194
Adaptation and Transformative Learning in an Undergraduate
History Class (Lısa Bunkowski) 207
Faiblesse des Deux Côtés: Adaptation and Value in Sexual
Subjectification (Jillian Saint Jacques) 232
About the Contributors 249
Index 253