Posted on

New Releases for May 8: Auto Racing, N.C. Civil War Monuments

Auto Racing Comes of Age: A Transatlantic View of the Cars, Drivers and Speedways, 1900–1925 by Robert Dick

The first quarter of the 20th century was a time of dramatic change in auto racing, marked by the move from the horseless carriage to the supercharged Grand Prix racer, from the gentleman driver to the well-publicized professional, and from the dusty road course to the autodrome. This history of the evolution of European and American auto racing from 1900 to 1925 examines transatlantic influences, early dirt track racing, and the birth of the twin-cam engine and the straight-eight. It also explores the origins of the Bennett and Vanderbilt races, the early career of “America’s Speed King” Barney Oldfield, the rise of the speedway specials from Marmon, Mercer, Stutz and Duesenberg, and developments from Peugeot, Delage, Ballot, Fiat, and Bugatti. This informative work provides welcome insight into a defining period in motorsports.

 

 

 

 

North Carolina Civil War Monuments: An Illustrated History by Douglas J. Butler

Throughout recorded history, monuments of stone and metal have honored victorious armies and successful leaders. Following the American Civil War this tradition expanded to include soldiers of the defeated Confederacy. By the early twentieth century, memorials to the dead and surviving veterans were regional icons, and men of the Confederate army ranked among history’s most honored troops.

This illustrated history details North Carolina’s commemorative response to a war in which more than 30,000 of its soldiers died in military service: 101 Confederate monuments—and eight Union memorials, including one honoring African American troops—were dedicated across the Tarheel State between 1865 and the Civil War centennial in 1961. The location, design, funding and dedication of these memorials reveal a society’s evolving grief and the forging of public memory. Committee minutes, financial records, legal documents, and contemporaneous accounts highlight the challenging and often contentious process through which these monuments were realized. Manufacturers’ catalogs and advertisements, as well as spirited editorial exchanges in newspapers and magazines, provide further insight into the sculptural, technological and cultural milieu.